A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

by

Mark Twain

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Hank Morgan Character Analysis

Hank Morgan is the Connecticut Yankee who finds himself thrown into sixth-century Britain and the court of King Arthur at Camelot. There, he takes on Clarence as a protégé, Sandy as a damsel in distress and later as his wife, and the knights of the Round Table, particularly Sir Sagramore, as impediments to his goal of using technological innovation and schools (“man factories”) to create a 19th-century civilization in Arthurian England. Hank is a man of paradoxes; though he is a dedicated advocate of American democracy, he aspires to be “The Boss” of his new society and relishes using his power (like when he forces Morgan le Fay to release her prisoners). He is bent on imposing his version of the ideal 19th-century society—one that is democratic, Protestant, capitalistic, and a technologically advanced superpower—on medieval Camelot, whether medieval society wants this change or not. Despite espousing self-determination, calling his schools “factories,” suggesting that he’s only interested in making one kind of person. Hank is a masterful showman, easily able to out-class Merlin and usurp his place as Arthur’s chief advisor. Hank confesses his addiction to performing these “effects”—the gaudier the better—and in the end, they are his downfall. Flaunting his wealth alienates people like Marco, Phyllis, and Dowley, and disparaging the laws makes him sound like a maniac. Finally, the “effect” by which Hank aspires to prove his superiority once and for all—defeating 30,000 knights with a force of fewer than 60 men and boys armed with machine guns—traps him and his supporters behind a wall of corpses and condemns them all to die of starvation and disease. According to Clarence, Merlin puts Hank into a magic coma. M.T. then encounters Hank in the 19th-century present, where Hank dies in a hotel room after crying out for Sandy.

Hank Morgan Quotes in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

The A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court quotes below are all either spoken by Hank Morgan or refer to Hank Morgan . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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).
Chapter 2 Quotes

I was not the only prisoner present […]. Poor devils, many of them were maimed, hacked, carved, in a frightful way; and their hair, their faces, their clothing, were caked with black […] blood. They were suffering sharp physical pain […] and weariness, and hunger and thirst, no doubt; and at least none had given them the comfort of a wash, or even the poor charity of a lotion for their wounds; yet you never heard them utter a moan or a groan, or saw them show any sign of restlessness, or any disposition to complain. The thought was forced upon me: “The rascals—they have served other people so in their day; it being their own turn, now, they were not expecting any better treatment than this; so their philosophical bearing is not an outcome of mental training, intellectual fortitude, reasoning; it is mere animal training; they are white Indians.”

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sir Kay, King Arthur
Page Number: 21
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

He spoke of me all the time, in the blandest way, as “this prodigious giant,” and “this horrible sky-towering monster,” and “this tusked and taloned man-devouring ogre”; and everybody took in all this bosh in the naivest way, and never smiled or seemed to notice that there was any discrepancy between these watered statistics and me. He said that in trying to escape from him I spang to the top of a tree two hundred cubits high at a single bound, but he dislodged me with a stone the size of a cow, which “all-to-brast” the most of my bones, and then swore me to appear at Arthur’s court for sentence. He ended by condemning me to die at noon on the twenty-first; and was so little concerned about it that he stopped to yawn before he named the date.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sir Kay, King Arthur
Page Number: 29
Explanation and Analysis:

[…] many of the terms used in the most matter-of-fact way by this great assemblage of first ladies and gentlemen in the country would have made a Comanche blush. Indelicacy is too mild a term to convey the idea. However, I had read “Tom Jones” and “Roderick Ransom,” and other books of that kind, and knew that the highest and first ladies and gentlemen in England had remained little or no cleaner in their talk, and in the morals and conduct which such talk implies, clear up to a hundred years ago; in fact clear into our own nineteenth century—in which century, broadly speaking, the earliest samples of the real lady and real gentleman discoverable in English history—or in European history, for that matter—may be said to have made their appearance.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sir Kay
Related Symbols: Clothing
Page Number: 30
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 6 Quotes

I have reflected, Sir King. For a lesson, I will let this darkness proceed, and spread night in the world; but whether I blot out the sun for good or restore it, shall rest with you. These are the terms, to wit: You shall remain king over all your dominions, and receive all the glories and honors that belong to the kingship; but you shall appoint me your perpetual minister and executive, and give me for my services one per cent of such actual increase of revenue over and above its present amount as I may succeed in creating for the state. If I can’t live on that, I shan’t ask anybody to give me a lift. Is it satisfactory?

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), King Arthur
Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

There were no books, pens, paper, or ink, and no glass in the openings they believed to be windows. It is a little thing—glass is—until it is absent, then it becomes a big thing. But perhaps the worst of all was, that there wasn’t any sugar, coffee, tea, or tobacco. I saw that I was just another Robinson Crusoe cast away on an uninhabited island, with no society but some more or less tame animals, and if I wanted to make life bearable I must do as he did—invent, contrive, create, reorganize things; set brain and hand to work, and keep them busy. Well, that was in my line.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), King Arthur
Related Symbols: Clothing
Page Number: 46
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

They were the quaintest and simplest and trustingest race; why, they were nothing but rabbits. It was pitiful for a person born in a wholesome free atmosphere to listen to their humble and hearty outpourings of loyalty toward their king and Church and nobility; as if they had any more occasion to love and honor king and Church and noble than a slave has to love and honor the lash, or a dog has to love and honor the stranger that kicks him! Why, dear me, any kind of royalty, howsoever modified, any kind of aristocracy, howsoever pruned, is rightly an insult; but if you are born and brought up under that sort of arrangement you probably never find it out for yourself, and don’t believe it when someone else tells you.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), King Arthur
Page Number: 53-54
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 10 Quotes

Four years rolled by—and then! Well, you would never imagine it in the world. Unlimited power is the ideal thing when it is in safe hands. The despotism of heaven is the one absolutely perfect government. An earthly despotism would be the absolutely perfect earthly government, if the conditions were the same, namely, the despot the perfectest individual of the human race, and his lease of life perpetual. But as a perishable perfect man must die and leave his despotism in the hands of an imperfect successor, an earthly despotism is not merely a bad form of government, it is the worst form that is possible.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker)
Page Number: 65
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 12 Quotes

Meantime, it was getting hotter and hotter in there. You see, the sun was beating down and warming up the iron more and more all the time. Well, when you are hot, that way, every little thing irritates you. When I trotted, I rattled like a crate of dishes, and that annoyed me; and moreover I couldn’t seem to stand that shield slatting and banging, now about my breast, now around my back; and if I dropped into a walk my joints creaked and screeched in that wearisome way a wheelbarrow does, and as we didn’t create any breeze at that gait, I was like to get fried in that stove; and besides, the quieter you went the heavier the iron settled down on you and the more and more tons you seemed to weigh every minute.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), King Arthur , Sir Sagramore
Related Symbols: Clothing
Page Number: 79
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 13 Quotes

So to speak, I was become a stockholder in a corporation where nine hundred and ninety-four of the members furnished all the money and did all the work, and the other six elected themselves a permanent board of direction and took all the dividends. It seemed to me that what the nine hundred and ninety-four dupes needed was a new deal. The thing that would have best suited the circus side of my nature would have been to resign the Boss-ship and get up an insurrection and turn it into a revolution; but I knew that the Jack Cade or the Wat Tyler who tries such a thing without first educating his materials up to revolution grade is almost absolutely certain to get left.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker)
Page Number: 88
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 16 Quotes

La Cote was much depressed, for he had scored here the worst failure of his campaign. He had not worked off a cake; yet he had tried all the tricks of the trade, even to the washing of a hermit; but the hermit died. This was indeed a bad failure, for this animal would now be dubbed a martyr, and would take his place among the saints of the Roman calendar. Thus made he his moan, this poor Sir La Cote Male Taile, and sorrowed passing sore. And so my heart bled for him, and I was moved to comfort and stay him. Wherefore I said—

“Forbear to grieve, fair knight, for this is not a defeat. We have brains you and I; and for such as have brains there are no defeats, but only victories.”

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sir La Cote Male Taile, Sandy
Page Number: 104-105
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 18 Quotes

Oh, it was no use to waste sense on her. Training—training is everything; training is all there is to a person. We speak of nature; it is folly; there is no such thing as nature; what we call by that misleading name is merely heredity and training. We have no thoughts of our own, no opinions of our own; they are transmitted to us, trained into us. All that is original in us, and therefore fairly creditable or discreditable to us, can be covered up and hidden by the point of a cambric needle, all the rest being atoms contributed by, and inherited from, a procession of ancestors that stretches back a billion years to the Adam-clam or grasshopper or monkey from whom our race has been so tediously and ostentatiously and unprofitably developed.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Morgan le Fay
Page Number: 119-120
Explanation and Analysis:

The newest prisoner’s crime was a mere remark which he had made. He said he believed that men were about all alike, and one man as good as another, barring clothes. He said he believed that if you were to strip the nation naked and send a stranger through the crowd, he couldn’t tell the king from a quack doctor, nor a duke from a hotel clerk. Apparently here was a man whose brains had not been reduced to an ineffectual mush by idiotic training. I set him loose and sent him off to the Factory.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker)
Related Symbols: Clothing, Factories
Page Number: 124
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 21 Quotes

Early in the afternoon we overtook another procession of pilgrims; but in this one there was no merriment, no jokes, no laughter, no playful ways, nor any happy giddiness, whether of youth or of age. Yet both were here […] Even the children were smileless; there was not a face among all these half a hundred people but was cast down and bore that set expression of hopelessness which is red of long and hard trials and old acquaintance with despair. They were slaves.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sandy
Page Number: 136
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 22 Quotes

“Yes, keep open. Isn’t that plain enough? Do [the hermits] knock off at noon?”

“Knock off?”

“Knock off—yes, knock off. What is the matter with knock off? I never saw such a dunderhead; can’t you understand anything at all? In plain terms, do they shut up shop, draw the game, bank the fires—”

“Shut up shop, draw—”

“There, never mind, let it go. You make me tired. You can’t seem to understand the simplest thing.”

“I would I might please thee, sir, and it is to me dole and sorrow that I should fail, albeit sith I am but a simple damsel and taught of none, being from the cradle unbaptized in those deep waters of learning that do anoint with a sovereignty him that partaketh of that most noble sacrament, investing him with reverend state to the mental eye of the humble mortal […]

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sandy
Page Number: 157
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 26 Quotes

Expedition No. 3 will start adout the first of mext █ month █ on a search f8r Sir Sagramour le Desirous. It is in command of the renowned Knight of the Red Lawns, assisted by Sir Persant of Inde, who is compete9t, intelligent, courteous, and in every ʍay a brick, and further assisted by Sir Palamides the Saracen, who is no huckleberry himself. This is no pic-nic, these boys mean busine&s.

Related Characters: Clarence (speaker), Hank Morgan , Sir Sagramore
Page Number: 198
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 29 Quotes

Here was heroism at its last and loftiest possibility, its utmost summit; this was challenging death in the open field unarmed, with all the odds against the challenger, no reward set upon the contest, and no admiring world in silks and cloth of gold to gaze and applaud; and yet the king’s bearing was as serenely brave as it had always been in those cheaper contests where knight meets knight in equal fight and clothed in protecting steel. He was great, now; sublimely great. The rude statues of his ancestors in his palace should have an addition—I would see to that; and it would not be a mailed king killing a giant or a dragon, like the rest, it would be a king in commoner’s garb bearing death in his arms that a peasant mother might look her last upon her child and be comforted.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), King Arthur
Related Symbols: Clothing
Page Number: 218
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 30 Quotes

A man is a man, at bottom. Whole ages of abuse and oppression cannot crush the manhood clear out of him. Whoever thinks it a mistake, is himself mistaken. Yes, there is plenty good enough material for a republic in the most degraded people that ever existed—even the Russians; plenty of manhood in them—even in the Germans—if one could but force it out of its timid and suspicious privacy, to overthrow and trample in the mud any throne that was ever set up and any nobility that ever supported it. We should see certain things yet, let us hope and believe. First, a modified monarchy, till Arthur’s days were done, then the destruction of the throne, nobility abolished, every member of it bound out to some useful trade, universal suffrage instituted, and the whole government placed in the hands of the men and women of the nation there to remain.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Marco, King Arthur
Page Number: 231
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 32 Quotes

Self-made man, you know. They know how to talk. They do deserve more credit than any other breed of men, yes, that is true; and they are among the very first to find it out, too. He told how he had begun life an orphan lad without money and without friends able to help him; how he had lived as the slaves of the meanest master lived; how his day’s work was from sixteen to eighteen hours long, and yielded him only enough black bread to keep him in a half-fed condition; how his faithful endeavors finally attracted the attention of a good blacksmith, who came near knocking him dead with kindness by suddenly offering, when he was totally unprepared, to take him as his bound apprentice for nine years and give him board and clothes and teach him the trade—or “mystery” as Dowley called it.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), King Arthur , Dowley
Related Symbols: Clothing
Page Number: 240
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 33 Quotes

Well, I was smarting under a sense of defeat. Undeserved defeat, but what of that? That didn’t soften the smart any. And to think of the circumstances! The first statesman of the age, the capablest man, the best-informed man in the entire world, the loftiest uncrowned head that had moved through the clouds of any political firmament for centuries, sitting here apparently defeated in argument by an ignorant country blacksmith! And I could see that those others were sorry for me—which made me blush till I could smell my whiskers scorching. Put yourself in my place; feel as mean as I did, as ashamed as I felt—wouldn’t you have struck below the belt to get even? Yes, you would; it is simply human nature. Well, that is what I did. I am not trying to justify it; I’m only saying that I was mad, and anybody would have done it.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Dowley
Page Number: 251
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 34 Quotes

This same infernal law had existed in our own south in my own time, more than thirteen hundred years later, and under it hundreds of freemen who could not prove that they were freemen had been sold into lifelong slavery without the circumstance making any particular impression upon me; but the minute law and the auction block came into my own personal experience, a think which had been merely improper became suddenly hellish. Well that’s the way we are made.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), King Arthur
Page Number: 267-268
Explanation and Analysis:

We took up our line of march and passed out of Cambenet at noon; and it seemed to me unaccountably strange and odd that the King of England and his chief minister, marching manacled and fettered and yoked, in a slave convoy, could move by all manner of idle men and women, and under windows where sat the sweet and the lovely, and yet never attract a curious eye, never provoke a single remark. Dear, dear, it only shows that there is nothing diviner about a king than there is about a tramp, after all. He is just a cheap and hollow artificiality when you don’t know he is a king. But reveal his quality, and dear me it takes your very breath away to look at him. I reckon we are all fools. Born so, no doubt.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), King Arthur
Related Symbols: Clothing
Page Number: 268
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 39 Quotes

So the world thought there was a vast matter at stake here, and the world was right, but it was not the one they had in their minds. No, a far vaster one was upon the cast of this die: the life of knight-errantry. I was a champion, it was true, but not the champion of the frivolous black arts, I was the champion of hard unsentimental common sense and reason. I was entering the lists to either destroy knight-errantry or be its victim.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sir Sagramore, Merlin
Page Number: 293-294
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 40 Quotes

The worship of royalty being founded in unreason, these graceful and harmless cats would easily become as sacred as any other royalties, and indeed more so, because it would presently be noticed that they hanged nobody, beheaded nobody, imprisoned nobody, inflicted no cruelties or injustices of any sort, and so must be worthy of a deeper love and reverence than the customary human king, and would certainly get it. The eyes of the whole harried world would soon be fixed upon this humane and gentle system, and royal butchers would presently begin to disappear; their subjects would fill the vacancies with catlings from our own royal house; we should become a factory; we should supply the thrones of the world; within forty years all Europe would be governed by cats, wand we should furnish the cats. The reign of universal peace would begin then, to end no more forever…M-e-e-e-yow-ow-ow—fzt—wow!

Related Characters: Clarence (speaker), Hank Morgan , Sir Sagramore
Related Symbols: Factories
Page Number: 305
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 42 Quotes

“From our various works I selected all the men—boys I mean—whose faithfulness under whatsoever pressure I could swear to, and I called them together secretly and gave them their instructions. There are fifty-two of them; none younger than fourteen, and none above seventeen years old.”

“Why did you select boys?”

“Because all the others were born in an atmosphere of superstition and reared in it. It is in their blood and bones. We imagined we had educated it out of them; they thought so, too; the Interdict woke them up like a thunderclap! It revealed them to themselves, and it revealed them to me, too. With boys it was different. Such as have been under our training from seven to ten years have had no acquaintance with the Church’s terrors, and it was amongst these that I found my fifty-two.”

Related Characters: Clarence (speaker), Hank Morgan , Mordred, King Arthur
Related Symbols: Factories
Page Number: 322
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 43 Quotes

The sun rose presently and sent its unobstructed splendors over the land, and we saw a prodigious host moving slowly toward us, with the steady drift and aligned front of a wave of the sea. Nearer and nearer it came, and more and more sublimely imposing became its aspect; yes, all England were there, apparently. Soon we could see the innumerable banners fluttering, and then the sun struck the sea of armor and set it all aflash. Yes, it was a fine sight; I hadn’t ever seen anything to beat it.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sir Sagramore
Page Number: 330
Explanation and Analysis:

“Stand to your guns, men! Open fire!”

The thirteen gatlings began to vomit death into the fated ten thousand. They halted, they stood their ground a moment against that withering deluge of fire, then they broke, faced about and swept toward the ditch like chaff before a gale. A full forth part of their force never reached the top of the lofty embankment; the three fourths reached it and plunged over—to death by drowning.

Within ten short minutes after we had opened fire, armed resistance was totally annihilated, the campaign was ended, we fifty-four were masters of England! Twenty-five thousand men lay dead around us.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), King Arthur
Page Number: 339
Explanation and Analysis:
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Hank Morgan Character Timeline in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

The timeline below shows where the character Hank Morgan appears in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
A Word of Explanation
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...unnamed narrator (identified in the postscript as M.T.) explains that he met a “curious stranger” (Hank Morgan) at Warwick Castle during a tour. The stranger seems knowledgeable about the medieval artifacts,... (full context)
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As M.T. finishes reading, the stranger (Hank Morgan) knocks on his door. By way of introduction, he explains that he is an... (full context)
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The stranger (Hank Morgan) says he is too tired to go on, but he gives M.T. a book... (full context)
Chapter 1: Camelot
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Hank assumes he’s still in Connecticut and that “Camelot” is the name of an asylum, since... (full context)
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Hank and the knight approach a town full of “wretched cabin[s]” and gardens “in indifferent state[s]... (full context)
Chapter 2: King Arthur’s Court
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In the courtyard, Hank tries to figure out where he is, but everyone uses strange turns of phrase like... (full context)
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For some reason, Hank believes Clarence immediately. He is overwhelmed with sadness at the thought that no one he... (full context)
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Deciding to call the boy Clarence, Hank asks about the man who brought him to Camelot. Clarence explains that his captor is... (full context)
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...least when a tussle among the many dogs that roam the hall doesn’t distract them. Hank is one of many prisoners. Some are injured, and all are unwashed. Their patient suffering... (full context)
Chapter 3: Knights of the Table Round
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As the knights carry on about their adventures, Hank realizes that most of their battles are irrational encounters between strangers. It’s like when two... (full context)
Chapter 4: Sir Dinadan the Humorist
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Merlin’s tale puts everyone but Hank to sleep. Sir Dinadan wakes them up with a practical joke, then he regales the... (full context)
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Next, it’s Sir Kay’s turn to explain how he defeated Hank. Kay claims he found Hank in a barbarian land, defeated the magical properties of his... (full context)
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As the lords and ladies make off-color comments about Hank and his outfit, Merlin calms the crowd’s fear over the magical properties of Hank’s clothes... (full context)
Chapter 5: An Inspiration
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In the dungeon, Hank is so exhausted that he immediately falls asleep. Waking up, he initially thinks he’s had... (full context)
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Hank has no patience for “old humbug” Merlin or the “chuckleheaded […] superstitions” his so-called magic... (full context)
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With Clarence gone, Hank has two unsettling thoughts. First, he worries that the boy will realize it’s suspicious for... (full context)
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Hank confirms with Clarence that it’s the 20th of June and that his execution is set... (full context)
Chapter 6: The Eclipse
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Left alone, the seriousness of Hank’s situation begins to sink in, and his blood runs cold. But his optimistic nature ultimately... (full context)
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In answer to Hank’s protests that the execution was supposed to be the next day, the guards reply that... (full context)
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...watch the execution is palpable. They sit as still and silent as stones. Executioners tie Hank to the stake and pile logs around his legs. Then a monk raises his face... (full context)
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Suddenly, the monk falls silent. Hank follows his gaze and sees the beginning of the solar eclipse. Merlin shouts for Hank... (full context)
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Hank tells King Arthur that he’s going to blot out the sun entirely, and he will... (full context)
Chapter 7: Merlin’s Tower
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Hank is now the second-most important person in the kingdom. This means he has fine, showy... (full context)
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Initially, people come from far and wide to meet Hank the powerful magician. When he fails to perform any more miracles, Merlin insinuates that he... (full context)
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...is threateningly sunny. Finally, at dusk, a storm begins to gather on the horizon, and Hank starts the show. In front of King Arthur, Merlin, and the assembled crowds, he offers... (full context)
Chapter 8: The Boss
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Blowing up Merlin’s tower consolidates Hank’s power. Although it’s initially hard to accept that he’s really in the sixth century, he... (full context)
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The aristocracy and the Church enslave the people of sixth-century Britain. To Hank, born in the “wholesome free atmosphere” of 19th-century America, their outpourings of love and respect... (full context)
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To a certain extent, Hank realizes that his own ideas are as entrenched as those of the medieval Britons; he... (full context)
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Although Hank considers himself a “a man among children,” he gets less respect than even the most... (full context)
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The exchange of respect and disrespect between Hank and the medieval people is mutual. Hank looks down on the king and the knights... (full context)
Chapter 9: The Tournament
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Tournaments—where knights fight each other in jousts and war games—are common at Camelot. Hank appreciates the spectacle even if his “practical mind” finds tournaments pointless. Besides, as a “statesman,”... (full context)
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...amputating the limbs of injured knights. As part of his efforts to establish a newspaper, Hank asks a priest from his “Department of Public Morals and Agriculture” to write a report... (full context)
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...doesn’t make it into the priest’s final report. While fighting Sir Gareth, Sir Sagramore overhears Hank wishing for a knight’s death. Sagramore (incorrectly) assumes it’s directed at him, and he challenges... (full context)
Chapter 10: Beginnings of Civilization
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The court eagerly discusses the upcoming fight between Hank and Sir Sagramore. Many people encourage Hank to go on his own quest so he... (full context)
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Four years pass, showing what a benign despot like Hank can accomplish. He has all the pieces of a 19th-century civilization ready to go, but... (full context)
Chapter 11: The Yankee in Search of Adventure
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According to Hank, the country is full of “wandering liars” of both sexes. Sure enough, a woman soon... (full context)
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Hank calls for the young lady and asks her questions about the particulars of her account.... (full context)
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The knights, good if childish creatures, eagerly give Hank pointers for his quest. They don’t seem to see how it’s illogical to give advice... (full context)
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...they ride through the village, the local boys throw clods of dirt at them, and Hank wishes he could hop down and settle the score. But without a derrick (a tower... (full context)
Chapter 12: Slow Torture
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As Hank and Sandy ride through the countryside, Hank reflects on its charm and beauty. But the... (full context)
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Finally, Hank and Sandy stop by a stream. Sandy removes Hank’s helmet, brings him a drink, and... (full context)
Chapter 13: Freemen!
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Though the break initially feels like a relief, Hank quickly becomes dissatisfied because he can’t light his pipe. He’s found a tobacco substitute and... (full context)
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When night falls, it brings a storm. Hank finds a dry place under a rock for Sandy, who sleeps soundly and wakes up... (full context)
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 Before sunrise, they are on the road again, Sandy riding the horse, and Hank limping wearily along behind her. Soon, they come upon a group of “ragged poor creatures”... (full context)
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...required to work for free on the lord bishop’s roads three days each year, remind Hank of the “blessed Revolution” in France. In Hank’s opinion, France experienced two reigns of terror,... (full context)
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This man impresses Hank; Hank believes that if enough people held the man’s views, then he could replace the... (full context)
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In medieval England, Hank is like a stockholder in a company where six people out of 1,000 make the... (full context)
Chapter 14: “Defend Thee, Lord!”
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To show his appreciation for the meal, Hank gives the freemen three pennies (by now he has the kingdom using American monetary values).... (full context)
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Hank and Sandy spend the night with a holy hermit before resuming their journey. At midafternoon... (full context)
Chapter 15: Sandy’s Tale
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As they ride on, Hank asks Sandy where the seven defeated knights “hang out.” Once she understands what it means,... (full context)
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Sandy resumes her tale, with Hank occasionally interrupting to correct her archaic phrasing. The woman-hating knight was Irish prince Marhaus. Sir... (full context)
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Hank interrupts with a complaint about Sandy’s limited vocabulary and repetitive narrative style. Without details, he... (full context)
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When Hank’s attention returns to the story, the knights have come upon three damsels (ladies) by a... (full context)
Chapter 16: Morgan le Fay
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...to the Round Table’s knights-errant, not all castles are good places to stop. And while Hank usually feels that their tales are vastly overexaggerated, he does like to find out who... (full context)
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...If he encounters another knight-errant, he should wash him and turn him into a sales-knight. Hank’s soap factory supports this effort; the factory is quickly growing, though Camelot’s residents don’t appreciate... (full context)
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The sales-knight tells Hank that the castle belongs to Morgan le Fay, King Arthur’s sister. Then he admits that... (full context)
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...knights in Sandy’s tale). In person, Morgan is surprisingly beautiful and alluring enough to make Hank conclude that her evil reputation is an exaggeration. But then, she kills a servant in... (full context)
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When Hank momentarily forgets the bad blood between Morgan and her brother and compliments King Arthur, Morgan... (full context)
Chapter 17: A Royal Banquet
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Morgan tries to give Hank an excuse to show off. The call to evening prayer spares Hank from having to... (full context)
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...that “The Boss” will dissolve the castle if harm comes to the woman. An alarmed Hank knows that he can’t follow through on the threat. Fortunately, Morgan believes his reputation enough... (full context)
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During a lull in the after-dinner conversation, Hank hears a scream from the depths of the castle. Morgan offers to take Hank to... (full context)
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...opposite directions painfully. In the corner, a woman huddles with a small child. A horrified Hank stops the execution. He has the peasant unbound and then dismisses Morgan and her men,... (full context)
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The peasant’s wife rushes to embrace him. Hank, worried about a false accusation by the anonymous informant (whom Hank suspects of being the... (full context)
Chapter 18: In the Queen’s Dungeons
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Hank arranges to send the poaching peasant home. The priest asks Hank to punish the executioner... (full context)
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Morgan is outraged to have been denied the peasant’s property or his life. While Hank admits that law and custom entitle her to both, he claims that extenuating circumstances required... (full context)
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Hank and Morgan have mutually unintelligible concepts of justice. Morgan believes that she has the right... (full context)
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Thoroughly disgusted, Hank wants to leave, but his conscience demands that he first examine the contents of Morgan... (full context)
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Hank orders all but one of Morgan’s 47 prisoners released. The one prisoner who remains imprisoned... (full context)
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When Hank brings this procession of “human bats” into the sunshine, he expresses his wish that he... (full context)
Chapter 19: Knight-Errantry as a Trade
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The next morning, Hank and Sandy are on the road again, riding through the pleasant fresh air. Hank is... (full context)
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After Sandy finishes her story, Hank declares he understands a little bit more about knight-errantry as a trade. A knight who... (full context)
Chapter 20: The Ogre’s Castle
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Around noon, Hank and Sandy encounter Sir Madok de la Montaine, one of Hank’s sales-knights who advertises toothbrushes... (full context)
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Still angry, Sir Madok rides off. Later in the afternoon, Hank and Sandy see one of the freed prisoners. The prisoner’s friends and neighbors welcome him... (full context)
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Two days later, Sandy announces that they’ve arrived at the ogres’ castle. But Hank looks ahead of them and sees three scrawny swineherds guarding a pigsty. Sandy decides that... (full context)
Chapter 21: The Pilgrims
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Hank is exhausted from the adventure, but he can’t sleep because the pigs—which are running around... (full context)
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In the morning, Sandy serves the pigs a grand breakfast at the main table, while Hank (because he is a commoner) is banished to a lesser seat in the hall. It... (full context)
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While Sandy bids farewell to “the pork,” Hank suggests that the servants to clean up the place before the family returns. He wants... (full context)
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No sooner are Hank and Sandy on their way then they come upon a procession of well-dressed, well-equipped, middle-class... (full context)
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Sandy explains the Valley of Holiness to Hank. Long ago, a group of monks moved there to study, pray, and practice austerities, like... (full context)
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Later that afternoon, Hank, Sandy, and the pilgrims encounter another group of travelers. They are also pilgrims of a... (full context)
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The band of pilgrims stops at an inn for the night. In the morning, Hank intercepts Sir Ozana le Cure Hardy, another of his knights. Ozana carries stovepipe hats. Hank... (full context)
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Hank sends Ozana back to Camelot with a requisition for Clarence to send men and supplies... (full context)
Chapter 22: The Holy Fountain
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...shrouded in a sense of doom. The abbot in charge sheds tears of relief on Hank’s arrival. (full context)
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Because he needs to buy some time for his materials to arrive, Hank explains that it’s bad form for two rival magicians to work at the same time.... (full context)
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Despite this enforced wait, the monks are so relieved by Hank’s arrival that they finally eat a decent meal and begin to cheer up. When start... (full context)
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In the morning, Hank visits the well, where Merlin is busy waving his arms and muttering incantations. He’s too... (full context)
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Having determined that he can restore the fountain, Hank promises the monks that he will try if or when Merlin fails. And he warns... (full context)
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On his way back to the pilgrims’ quarters, Hank runs into Sandy, who has been out “sampling the hermits.” He wants to do the... (full context)
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...He bows rapidly and repetitively, and this motion is so nearly perpetual that it gives Hank an idea. Hank briefly turns aside from the chronology of his narrative, to explain how... (full context)
Chapter 23: Restoration of the Fountain
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...an unpronounceable name has cursed the well and that no one can break the curse. Hank agrees with Merlin’s assessment about the demon but assures the abbot that he can break... (full context)
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That evening, Hank’s men and supplies arrive from Camelot, and they make quick work of repairing the well’s... (full context)
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The excitement in the crowd builds to a fever pitch.  Hank stands on a platform, holding out his hands and pronouncing nonsense words. At the end... (full context)
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Hank shows the monks how to work the pump—they won’t have to laboriously draw the water... (full context)
Chapter 24: A Rival Magician
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Hank decides to do something valuable with his esteemed reputation. He uses the arrival of one... (full context)
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One morning during his recovery, Hank talks a walk past a cave that a hermit recently vacated. Inside, he hears a... (full context)
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Back at the monastery, Hank finds a traveling magician who claims that he can see what any person anywhere in... (full context)
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On the day that Hank thinks King Arthur is supposed to arrive, the monks show no sign of preparation for... (full context)
Chapter 25: A Competitive Examination
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...continues to judge cases as the Chief Justice of the King’s Bench on the road. Hank considers King Arthur a “wise and humane judge,” although his training means that he has... (full context)
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One case that King Arthur hears in the Valley particularly bothers Hank. An orphaned young noblewoman married a poor young man. Her father was a vassal to... (full context)
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...his rights. As punishment, the girl and her husband lose all their possessions to him. Hank believes that brutal laws like these are only possible where not everyone has a vote,... (full context)
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...ways in which the monarchy fails to serve the interests of its citizens. He follows Hank’s suggestion that all candidates be examined, but the only qualification he looks for is four... (full context)
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Eventually, Hank hits on a solution by suggesting that King Arthur select officers for a “King’s Own... (full context)
Chapter 26: The First Newspaper
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When Hank shares his plan to disguise himself as a freeman, King Arthur immediately wants to join... (full context)
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Hank attends the king’s laying-on of hands as a matter of state; the proceedings are boring... (full context)
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Something new happens to interrupt Hank’s boredom: the cry of a boy hawking the “Camelot Weekly Hosannah and Literary Volcano” newspaper.... (full context)
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A gaggle of curious monks interrupts Hank’s eager reading. Hank explains that the thin material is paper (the monks mistook it for... (full context)
Chapter 27: The Yankee and the King Travel Incognito
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Around bedtime, Hank takes King Arthur up to his room and gives him an awkward haircut to help... (full context)
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But the sound of approaching voices interrupts Hank’s rest. A train of nobles, servants, and baggage-mules appears in the road. Hank rushes back... (full context)
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Arthur naively wanders in and out of mischief for the next few days, taxing Hank’s patience and energy. After the king procures a dagger from a smuggler (commoners aren’t allowed... (full context)
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...posture betrays his pride and his martial desire to challenge the man to a fight. Hank usually gets him out of the road in time. But on the third day, a... (full context)
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Fragments of horse and knight flesh rain down on Hank and a stunned Arthur. There’s a hole in the road that no one will be... (full context)
Chapter 28: Drilling the King
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By the fourth day of the trip, Hank knows he must rehearse Arthur’s peasant act until it’s finally convincing. The king’s clothing is... (full context)
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Hank asks King Arthur to demonstrate how he would approach a hut situated nearby. Arthur’s instinct... (full context)
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As Arthur resumes practicing his downtrodden peasant attitude, Hank encourages him to imagine a life completely unlike his own, one in which he is... (full context)
Chapter 29: The Smallpox Hut
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By midafternoon, Hank thinks King Arthur’s disguise might fool people. They approach the nearby hut, which is shrouded... (full context)
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Hank returns to find King Arthur inside opening the shutters. The new light reveals that the... (full context)
Chapter 30: The Tragedy of the Manor House
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Hank and King Arthur stay with the woman until she dies around midnight. Since the family... (full context)
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Although Hank recognizes that King Arthur is a product of his upbringing, Arthur’s unjust beliefs still annoy... (full context)
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Hank and King Arthur pass six more bodies in the woods, as a once-distant murmur grows... (full context)
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When Hank and King Arthur wake, the wife (later identified as Phyllis) details the previous night’s events.... (full context)
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...13 prisoners died in the fire, and the mob hanged or killed 18 other prisoners. Hank wants to know why the prisoners died. It didn’t occur to Marco or anyone else... (full context)
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...to turn on one other in ways that serve the interests of the aristocracy reminds Hank of the “poor whites” in the American south who sacrificed their lives to protect the... (full context)
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But when they leave the house, Hank makes it clear he has no intention of helping anyone catch the “poor lads.” Marco... (full context)
Chapter 31: Marco
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Marco and Hank stroll toward the village. This allows them to pretend that they’ve summoned the authorities and... (full context)
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One matter on which Hank questions Marco is that of wages. As a good economist, Hank understands that it’s not... (full context)
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The most interesting villager Hank meets is Dowley, the blacksmith. Dowley is wealthy (by village standards) and respected, and Hank... (full context)
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Marco and Phyllis wear the coarse, heavily patched clothing of the commoners. Hank wants to get them each a “new suit.” Hank invents a backstory for Jones (Arthur),... (full context)
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Hank can’t do anything quietly and without theatrical flair. He flashes his money at a shopkeeper,... (full context)
Chapter 32: Dowley’s Humiliation
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When Hank’s purchases start arriving on Saturday, Marco and Phyllis are completely overwhelmed. It’s not just food:... (full context)
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On the day of the party, Hank encourages Dowley to talk about himself which, as a self-made man, he is only too... (full context)
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...small roast pig,” and plenty of fine white bread. And when the table is spread, Hank subtly beckons the shopkeeper’s son to present the bill, which comes to 39,150 milrays (a... (full context)
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The guests are falling out of their chairs in amazement when Hank completes the show by handing Marco and Phyllis each a miller-gun (a money-dispensing device of... (full context)
Chapter 33: Sixth-Century Political Economy
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Hank has humiliated Dowley. But his evidently great wealth has also earned the blacksmith’s respect. If... (full context)
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...to understand that the value of money can vary from one kingdom to the next. Hank is the “best-informed man in the entire world,” yet an ignorant blacksmith has won the... (full context)
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Hank also shares that, in the future, it won’t be the magistrate who fixes the wages... (full context)
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Hank sets up his final blow by pointing to another unfair law: if a person knows... (full context)
Chapter 34: The Yankee and the King Sold as Slaves
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Hank tries to regain control of the situation with a diversion. The closest one is the... (full context)
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Just then, Arthur returns from his nap with an ominous twinkle in his eye. Hank can’t prevent him from launching into a lecture on farming that betrays his absolute ignorance... (full context)
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Pursued by the villagers and their dogs, Hank and Arthur momentarily gain an advantage by crossing a stream and climbing into a nearby... (full context)
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As Hank and Arthur descend a gentleman named Earl Grip saves them from the mob. Grip generously... (full context)
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Hank and Arthur protest that they are freemen. But they are strangers in this village, and... (full context)
Chapter 35: A Pitiful Incident
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As Hank, Arthur, and the slaves march toward London, Arthur broods over the insult of being sold... (full context)
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...his opinion on the question of abolishing slavery, something he refused to even talk to Hank about when they were at Camelot. His change of heart increases Hank’s desire to escape.... (full context)
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...A priest accompanies the woman and tells her sad tale to the assembled crowd, and Hank paraphrases the priest’s words in his account. He notes that sometimes justice fails, as in... (full context)
Chapter 36: An Encounter in the Dark
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In dirty, crowded London, none of the well-dressed noble people recognize Arthur and Hank. Hank is relieved, however, to see that Clarence is still carrying on his work, as... (full context)
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One gentleman is particularly interested in buying Hank but not quite willing to pay the slave driver’s asking price of $22. But he... (full context)
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Hank impatiently waits for the rest of the slaves to settle into a deep sleep, then... (full context)
Chapter 37: An Awful Predicament
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Hank spends a miserable night in the city jail. In the morning, when the magistrate hears... (full context)
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Hank returns to the slave quarters and finds that the slave master has been beaten to... (full context)
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Hank procures a disguise at a second-hand clothes seller’s shop, then he follows the telegraph line... (full context)
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In the meantime, Hank plans to reveal himself to some of the people he knows in town. But he... (full context)
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The slave identifies Hank as the missing man, eager that the person responsible for his death sentence should hang,... (full context)
Chapter 38: Sir Launcelot and the Knights to the Rescue
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...Three slaves are executed, then the executioners blindfold Arthur and lead him to the rope. Hank instinctively leaps forward to try to rescue the king just as 500 “mailed and belted... (full context)
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Hank waves his (cloth-wrapped) right arm wildly in the air, drawing Launcelot’s attention, extricates Arthur from... (full context)
Chapter 39: The Yankee’s Fight with the Knights
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A few days later, Hank is back at Camelot, perusing the paper. It announces the date of his long-delayed fight... (full context)
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...between men but between great magicians. Merlin is enchanting Sir Sagramore’s weapons and armor, and Hank has already shown himself to be one of the “master enchanters of the age.” What... (full context)
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Sir Sagramore looks grand in his heavy plate armor on his armored horse. In contrast, Hank sits astride an unarmored horse wearing nothing more than a “gymnast’s costume” of a unitard... (full context)
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With Sir Sagramore unhorsed, the field is open for other knights to challenge Hank, and he quickly dispatches Sir Hervis de Revel, Sir Lamorak de Galis, and Sir Galahad... (full context)
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This time, when Sir Sagramore charges, Hank stands his ground while the anguished crowd screams at him to save himself. When Sagramore... (full context)
Chapter 40: Three Years Later
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Having broken “the back of knight-errantry,” Hank unveils all the schools, mines, factories, newspapers, printing presses, telegraphs, telephones, and steam- and electric-powered... (full context)
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Hank has two long-term projects remaining: overthrowing the Roman Catholic Church and replacing it with Protestant... (full context)
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...rid of the royal family entirely will cause the citizens too much despair. If, as Hank claims, kings are dangerous, Clarence thinks that they could be replaced with cats. Cats would... (full context)
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Just as Hank is about to scold Clarence for his jokes, Sandy rushes in. Hank and Sandy’s daughter,... (full context)
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After a month, Hank sends the company’s vessel back to England for fresh supplies and news. He’s particularly anxious... (full context)
Chapter 41: The Interdict
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Soon after Hank dispatches the ship for England, Hello-Central takes a turn for the worse, demanding all of... (full context)
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 Sandy named the child “Hello-Central” because Hank would sometimes call that out in his sleep, and she thought he was saying the... (full context)
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When Hello-Central fully recovers, Hank and Sandy feel an enormous sense of relief and gratitude. And then they realize that... (full context)
Chapter 42: War!
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Hank finds a melancholy Clarence brooding in his quarters. Clarence recognizes his boss instantly, despite the... (full context)
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Hank wants to know how Arthur is doing now, and Clarence explains that Arthur died and... (full context)
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...indoctrination of Church and aristocracy. If someone was trained to respect these institutions from birth, Hank’s schools won’t be able to reeducate them. Clarence established a secret base in Merlin’s old... (full context)
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...wait for the fury of the knights and the Church to break over them, but Hank wants to strike first. He does this by issuing a proclamation that, with the “executive... (full context)
Chapter 43: The Battle of the Sand Belt
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In Merlin’s Cave, Hank, Clarence, and their 52 “fresh, bright, well-educated, clean-minded […] British boys” wait for the onslaught.... (full context)
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Hank’s spies carry news of the gathering forces of knights and priests, and Hank slowly starts... (full context)
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Hank assures his boys that they will have to do no such thing. Thirty thousand knights... (full context)
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...is “amazing” and “beyond estimate” since the dead are no longer individuals, only “homogeneous protoplasm.” Hank knows that there are no reinforcements and that this is the “last stand of chivalry... (full context)
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To prepare for the next attack from the ignorant forces of chivalry, Hank has some of the boys dig a ditch to divert a nearby stream behind the... (full context)
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Hank waits in the darkness, straining to hear any approaching knights since the night is too... (full context)
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Feeling that the moment has come, Hank throws a switch and turns on floodlights that illuminate the area outside the cave. The... (full context)
Chapter 44: A Postscript by Clarence
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...tale of the Connecticut Yankee. He recounts how, soon after the end of the battle, Hank decides (over Clarence’s objections) to go out and see if there are wounded who need... (full context)
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...either succumb to the “poisonous air” or lose their invincibility by abandoning their fortified position. Hank is on the verge of going out to try and broker a truce when Clarence... (full context)
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...them escapes, they will note it in the book and then hide the manuscript with Hank, since it belongs to him. (full context)
A Final P.S. by M.T.
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...about to break. He finds the door to the stranger’s room ajar. Inside, the stranger (Hank) lies in bed, talking to himself in an animated and delirious manner. He hears the... (full context)