A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

by

Mark Twain

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Marco is a freeman who, along with his wife Phyllis, hosts Hank Morgan and King Arthur while they travel the country disguised as commoners. In thanks, Hank buys new clothes, furniture, and lavish amounts of food for the couple. The book insinuates that “Marco” is a name assigned by Hank, who often gives his medieval acquaintances modern names. Marco is a charcoal burner who makes a small living for himself but isn’t as rich as others in his village, like the blacksmith, Dowley. Nevertheless, he is generous and conscientious. He treats Hank and Arthur with kindness until Hank’s attempts to show off his superior intellect scare Marco, Dowley, and the other villagers into attacking the strangers in their midst.

Marco Quotes in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

The A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court quotes below are all either spoken by Marco or refer to Marco. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
).
Chapter 30 Quotes

A man is a man, at bottom. Whole ages of abuse and oppression cannot crush the manhood clear out of him. Whoever thinks it a mistake, is himself mistaken. Yes, there is plenty good enough material for a republic in the most degraded people that ever existed—even the Russians; plenty of manhood in them—even in the Germans—if one could but force it out of its timid and suspicious privacy, to overthrow and trample in the mud any throne that was ever set up and any nobility that ever supported it. We should see certain things yet, let us hope and believe. First, a modified monarchy, till Arthur’s days were done, then the destruction of the throne, nobility abolished, every member of it bound out to some useful trade, universal suffrage instituted, and the whole government placed in the hands of the men and women of the nation there to remain.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Marco, King Arthur
Page Number: 231
Explanation and Analysis:
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Marco Character Timeline in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

The timeline below shows where the character Marco appears in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 30: The Tragedy of the Manor House
Nature vs. Nurture  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
In the present, Phyllis’s husband (later identified as Marco) returns with more information. In addition to the two yeomen, 13 prisoners died in the... (full context)
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...reverie, impatiently insisting that they pursue the murderers. To placate Arthur, Hank offers to show Marco the direction he thinks they murderers went. (full context)
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
...Hank makes it clear he has no intention of helping anyone catch the “poor lads.” Marco is relieved, and he unburdens his soul to Hank, explaining that he participated in the... (full context)
Chapter 31: Marco
Nature vs. Nurture  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
Marco and Hank stroll toward the village. This allows them to pretend that they’ve summoned the... (full context)
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
One matter on which Hank questions Marco is that of wages. As a good economist, Hank understands that it’s not the sheer... (full context)
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...and Hank invites him (and the head mason and wheelwright) to come to dinner at Marco’s on Sunday. Marco is pleased when Dowley accepts—then immediately terrified at the prospect of the... (full context)
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
Marco and Phyllis wear the coarse, heavily patched clothing of the commoners. Hank wants to get... (full context)
Chapter 32: Dowley’s Humiliation
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
When Hank’s purchases start arriving on Saturday, Marco and Phyllis are completely overwhelmed. It’s not just food: Hank bought new furniture, crockery, beer,... (full context)
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...are falling out of their chairs in amazement when Hank completes the show by handing Marco and Phyllis each a miller-gun (a money-dispensing device of his own design) loaded with fifteen... (full context)
Chapter 34: The Yankee and the King Sold as Slaves
Imperialism  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...of the situation with a diversion. The closest one is the miller-gun he gave to Marco, which is still clutched in the man’s frozen hand. Hank invented the device himself. It’s... (full context)
Nature vs. Nurture  Theme Icon
...they reach the shelter of the nearby forest than they hear an approaching mob. Apparently, Marco and Phyllis slipped away from the fight to get help. (full context)