A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

by

Mark Twain

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Demoiselle Alisande la Carteloise, whom Hank Morgan quickly begins to call “Sandy,” is a young woman who travels to Camelot with a tragic tale of being imprisoned (along with dozens of other fine ladies) in a castle guarded by ogres. Hank accompanies Sandy on a quest to free the remaining women. When they arrive to find a herd of pigs, Sandy insists the women have just been enchanted to look like pigs. In this way, Sandy represents the superstitious imagination and illogical belief systems of the uncivilized, medieval Britons. But, like Clarence, Sandy plays a key role as one of Hank’s sixth-century interpreters. She learns to translate his 19th-century slang and teaches him the meaning of medieval idioms. She also tells him the history of other knights he encounters and teaches him the conventions of knight errantry (for instance, once Hank has defeated the “ogres,” his responsibility to the ladies/pigs is over, and he doesn’t have to escort each one home individually). Sandy shows her devotion to Hank when she searches all over England for him after he disappears without warning from the Valley of Holiness (he is traveling incognito). Hank eventually realizes Sandy’s value and comes to see her as a wife and a friend. Sandy names their daughter Hello-Central because she mistakenly thinks that this is the name of one of Hank’s long-lost 19th-century beloveds, implying not only that she believes his outlandish tale of travel though time and space, but that she loves him enough to care about his life before he came to England. She and Hank are separated when he leaves her and Hello-Central (who is recuperating from a serious illness) in France and returns to find that England has plunged into civil war.

Sandy Quotes in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

The A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court quotes below are all either spoken by Sandy or refer to Sandy. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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).
Chapter 16 Quotes

La Cote was much depressed, for he had scored here the worst failure of his campaign. He had not worked off a cake; yet he had tried all the tricks of the trade, even to the washing of a hermit; but the hermit died. This was indeed a bad failure, for this animal would now be dubbed a martyr, and would take his place among the saints of the Roman calendar. Thus made he his moan, this poor Sir La Cote Male Taile, and sorrowed passing sore. And so my heart bled for him, and I was moved to comfort and stay him. Wherefore I said—

“Forbear to grieve, fair knight, for this is not a defeat. We have brains you and I; and for such as have brains there are no defeats, but only victories.”

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sir La Cote Male Taile, Sandy
Page Number: 104-105
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 21 Quotes

Early in the afternoon we overtook another procession of pilgrims; but in this one there was no merriment, no jokes, no laughter, no playful ways, nor any happy giddiness, whether of youth or of age. Yet both were here […] Even the children were smileless; there was not a face among all these half a hundred people but was cast down and bore that set expression of hopelessness which is red of long and hard trials and old acquaintance with despair. They were slaves.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sandy
Page Number: 136
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 22 Quotes

“Yes, keep open. Isn’t that plain enough? Do [the hermits] knock off at noon?”

“Knock off?”

“Knock off—yes, knock off. What is the matter with knock off? I never saw such a dunderhead; can’t you understand anything at all? In plain terms, do they shut up shop, draw the game, bank the fires—”

“Shut up shop, draw—”

“There, never mind, let it go. You make me tired. You can’t seem to understand the simplest thing.”

“I would I might please thee, sir, and it is to me dole and sorrow that I should fail, albeit sith I am but a simple damsel and taught of none, being from the cradle unbaptized in those deep waters of learning that do anoint with a sovereignty him that partaketh of that most noble sacrament, investing him with reverend state to the mental eye of the humble mortal […]

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sandy
Page Number: 157
Explanation and Analysis:
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A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court PDF

Sandy Character Timeline in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

The timeline below shows where the character Sandy appears in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 11: The Yankee in Search of Adventure
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
Nature vs. Nurture  Theme Icon
...very fuzzy on the details. Her name is Alisande la Carteloise (Hank will call her Sandy). She can’t acceptably explain how far or in which direction the ogres’ castle lies. Hank... (full context)
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...mail. But Hank has no time to change. The others hoist him onto his horse, Sandy climbs up behind him, and they set off.  (full context)
Chapter 12: Slow Torture
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As Hank and Sandy ride through the countryside, Hank reflects on its charm and beauty. But the romance soon... (full context)
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Finally, Hank and Sandy stop by a stream. Sandy removes Hank’s helmet, brings him a drink, and douses him... (full context)
Chapter 13: Freemen!
Imperialism  Theme Icon
Nature vs. Nurture  Theme Icon
...night falls, it brings a storm. Hank finds a dry place under a rock for Sandy, who sleeps soundly and wakes up refreshed. In contrast, Hank spends a cold, wet night... (full context)
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 Before sunrise, they are on the road again, Sandy riding the horse, and Hank limping wearily along behind her. Soon, they come upon a... (full context)
Chapter 14: “Defend Thee, Lord!”
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Hank and Sandy spend the night with a holy hermit before resuming their journey. At midafternoon on the... (full context)
Chapter 15: Sandy’s Tale
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As they ride on, Hank asks Sandy where the seven defeated knights “hang out.” Once she understands what it means, she is... (full context)
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According to Sandy, Sir Gawaine and Sir Uwaine discovered a dozen ladies dishonoring a knight’s shield. Hank interrupts... (full context)
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Sandy resumes her tale, with Hank occasionally interrupting to correct her archaic phrasing. The woman-hating knight... (full context)
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Hank interrupts with a complaint about Sandy’s limited vocabulary and repetitive narrative style. Without details, he says her stories are “pale and... (full context)
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...the knights have come upon three damsels (ladies) by a fountain. Hank tries to convince Sandy to give the characters accents, like an Irish brogue for Marhaus. Sandy ignores him, doggedly... (full context)
Chapter 16: Morgan le Fay
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Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...find out who owns a place before he knocks on the door. As he and Sandy approach the castle, they encounter a knight wearing an advertisement placard for “Persimmon’s Soap.” This... (full context)
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...be turned into a saint. This knight used to be renowned for great feats, which Sandy tells Hank all about as they ride to the castle. (full context)
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Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...subdued husband, King Uriens, or her brawny son, Sir Uwaine (one of the knights in Sandy’s tale). In person, Morgan is surprisingly beautiful and alluring enough to make Hank conclude that... (full context)
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...Morgan and her brother and compliments King Arthur, Morgan orders him into the dungeon. Fortunately, Sandy pipes up, asking if Morgan covets destruction; it’s dangerous to cross “The Boss.” Instantly, Morgan... (full context)
Chapter 17: A Royal Banquet
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...Unafraid of the curse, Morgan instantly orders the woman to be burnt at the stake. Sandy jumps up to intervene, promising that “The Boss” will dissolve the castle if harm comes... (full context)
Chapter 19: Knight-Errantry as a Trade
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The next morning, Hank and Sandy are on the road again, riding through the pleasant fresh air. Hank is in a... (full context)
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After Sandy finishes her story, Hank declares he understands a little bit more about knight-errantry as a... (full context)
Chapter 20: The Ogre’s Castle
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Around noon, Hank and Sandy encounter Sir Madok de la Montaine, one of Hank’s sales-knights who advertises toothbrushes and toothpaste.... (full context)
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Still angry, Sir Madok rides off. Later in the afternoon, Hank and Sandy see one of the freed prisoners. The prisoner’s friends and neighbors welcome him home, but... (full context)
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Two days later, Sandy announces that they’ve arrived at the ogres’ castle. But Hank looks ahead of them and... (full context)
Chapter 21: The Pilgrims
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...are running around in the house—are making lots of noise. He’s also puzzled by how Sandy, as sane as anyone in the kingdom, could be deluded enough to think the pigs... (full context)
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In the morning, Sandy serves the pigs a grand breakfast at the main table, while Hank (because he is... (full context)
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While Sandy bids farewell to “the pork,” Hank suggests that the servants to clean up the place... (full context)
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No sooner are Hank and Sandy on their way then they come upon a procession of well-dressed, well-equipped, middle-class pilgrims heading... (full context)
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Sandy explains the Valley of Holiness to Hank. Long ago, a group of monks moved there... (full context)
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Later that afternoon, Hank, Sandy, and the pilgrims encounter another group of travelers. They are also pilgrims of a sort,... (full context)
Chapter 22: The Holy Fountain
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On his way back to the pilgrims’ quarters, Hank runs into Sandy, who has been out “sampling the hermits.” He wants to do the same if the... (full context)
Chapter 40: Three Years Later
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Just as Hank is about to scold Clarence for his jokes, Sandy rushes in. Hank and Sandy’s daughter, Hello-Central, is seriously ill with croup. Launcelot, on his... (full context)
Chapter 41: The Interdict
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...ship for England, Hello-Central takes a turn for the worse, demanding all of Hank and Sandy’s attention for the next two and a half weeks. Hank explains that Sandy felt honor-bound... (full context)
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 Sandy named the child “Hello-Central” because Hank would sometimes call that out in his sleep, and... (full context)
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When Hello-Central fully recovers, Hank and Sandy feel an enormous sense of relief and gratitude. And then they realize that their ship... (full context)
Chapter 43: The Battle of the Sand Belt
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...the story of his adventures up to the present moment and then writing letters to Sandy and Hello-Central. The letters make him feel almost as if his family is with him. (full context)
A Final P.S. by M.T.
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...himself in an animated and delirious manner. He hears the narrator and misidentifies him as Sandy. He asks after Hello-Central and complains of terrible dreams about the king’s death and a... (full context)