A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

by

Mark Twain

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Sir Gawaine Character Analysis

Sir Gawaine serves King Arthur and as one of the knights of the Round Table. Sandy tells Hank Morgan about Gawaine’s chivalric exploits, which include fighting with and befriending the Irish prince Marhaus. When a brutal civil war breaks out between Arthur and Sir Launcelot over Guenever’s affections, Launcelot accidentally kills two of Gawaine’s brothers. Gawaine refuses to forgive Launcelot or sign a truce, and he loses his life in the ongoing conflict.
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Sir Gawaine Character Timeline in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

The timeline below shows where the character Sir Gawaine appears in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 15: Sandy’s Tale
Imperialism  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
According to Sandy, Sir Gawaine and Sir Uwaine discovered a dozen ladies dishonoring a knight’s shield. Hank interrupts to say... (full context)
Imperialism  Theme Icon
...Hank occasionally interrupting to correct her archaic phrasing. The woman-hating knight was Irish prince Marhaus. Sir Gawaine warned the women that the two knights guarding their tower wouldn’t be able to withstand... (full context)
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
Nature vs. Nurture  Theme Icon
...scuffling in a fog.” Undisturbed, Sandy picks up where she left off, with Marhaus unhorsing Sir Gawaine . Hank slips into daydreams about boyhood trips to the seashore, and he ruminates on... (full context)
Chapter 42: War!
Imperialism  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
The Church tried to broker a peace, but Sir Gawaine insisted on making Launcelot pay for the accidental deaths of two of Gawaine’s brothers. Arthur... (full context)