A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

by

Mark Twain

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Sir Kay Character Analysis

Sir Kay is the first knight whom Hank Morgan encounters in medieval England. Kay captures Hank and brings him back to Camelot as a prisoner. Claiming that Hank is a powerful magician, Kay wants Hank burned at the stake, but his plan falls through when Hank convinces everyone that he is a powerful magician. Sir Kay dies in the civil war that breaks out after King Arthur discovers Guenever’s affair with Sir Launcelot.

Sir Kay Quotes in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

The A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court quotes below are all either spoken by Sir Kay or refer to Sir Kay. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
).
Chapter 2 Quotes

I was not the only prisoner present […]. Poor devils, many of them were maimed, hacked, carved, in a frightful way; and their hair, their faces, their clothing, were caked with black […] blood. They were suffering sharp physical pain […] and weariness, and hunger and thirst, no doubt; and at least none had given them the comfort of a wash, or even the poor charity of a lotion for their wounds; yet you never heard them utter a moan or a groan, or saw them show any sign of restlessness, or any disposition to complain. The thought was forced upon me: “The rascals—they have served other people so in their day; it being their own turn, now, they were not expecting any better treatment than this; so their philosophical bearing is not an outcome of mental training, intellectual fortitude, reasoning; it is mere animal training; they are white Indians.”

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sir Kay, King Arthur
Page Number: 21
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

He spoke of me all the time, in the blandest way, as “this prodigious giant,” and “this horrible sky-towering monster,” and “this tusked and taloned man-devouring ogre”; and everybody took in all this bosh in the naivest way, and never smiled or seemed to notice that there was any discrepancy between these watered statistics and me. He said that in trying to escape from him I spang to the top of a tree two hundred cubits high at a single bound, but he dislodged me with a stone the size of a cow, which “all-to-brast” the most of my bones, and then swore me to appear at Arthur’s court for sentence. He ended by condemning me to die at noon on the twenty-first; and was so little concerned about it that he stopped to yawn before he named the date.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sir Kay, King Arthur
Page Number: 29
Explanation and Analysis:

[…] many of the terms used in the most matter-of-fact way by this great assemblage of first ladies and gentlemen in the country would have made a Comanche blush. Indelicacy is too mild a term to convey the idea. However, I had read “Tom Jones” and “Roderick Ransom,” and other books of that kind, and knew that the highest and first ladies and gentlemen in England had remained little or no cleaner in their talk, and in the morals and conduct which such talk implies, clear up to a hundred years ago; in fact clear into our own nineteenth century—in which century, broadly speaking, the earliest samples of the real lady and real gentleman discoverable in English history—or in European history, for that matter—may be said to have made their appearance.

Related Characters: Hank Morgan (speaker), Sir Kay
Related Symbols: Clothing
Page Number: 30
Explanation and Analysis:
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Sir Kay Character Timeline in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

The timeline below shows where the character Sir Kay appears in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
A Word of Explanation
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
...aggressors try to pledge their loyalty to him, but he insists they give it to Sir Kay (the knight they were chasing), riding to Camelot and placing themselves under Guenever’s protection until... (full context)
Chapter 1: Camelot
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
Imperialism  Theme Icon
...is the name of an asylum, since he judges his captor (later revealed to be Sir Kay ) to be obviously insane. The landscape is quiet and peaceful, with little sign of... (full context)
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...of knights on horseback with “flaunting banners,” “rich doublets,” and “gilded spearheads” appears. Hank and Sir Kay join in, climbing up the hill and entering the castle.  (full context)
Chapter 2: King Arthur’s Court
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...asks about the man who brought him to Camelot. Clarence explains that his captor is Sir Kay and Hank will have to wait in the dungeon until his friends pay his ransom. ... (full context)
Chapter 3: Knights of the Table Round
Nature vs. Nurture  Theme Icon
At one point, half a dozen prisoners of Sir Kay throw themselves on the mercy of the queen, who will decide if they are pardoned,... (full context)
Chapter 4: Sir Dinadan the Humorist
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
Next, it’s Sir Kay ’s turn to explain how he defeated Hank. Kay claims he found Hank in a... (full context)