A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

by

Mark Twain

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Sir Launcelot Character Analysis

Sir Launcelot is the strongest and mightiest of the knights who serve King Arthur and sit at his Round Table. He’s also Queen Guenever’s lover, a fact that is common knowledge to everyone but Arthur. When Hank Morgan overthrows the chivalric order in England, Launcelot becomes the president of the stock board and takes to destroying his rivals financially rather than through physical combat. He and Hank are close friends, and Launcelot loves Hank’s daughter, Hello-Central, like a niece. But when Launcelot’s affair with Guenever is revealed, his indiscretion plunges the kingdom into civil war, ultimately leading to Arthur’s death and Hank’s downfall.
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Sir Launcelot Character Timeline in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

The timeline below shows where the character Sir Launcelot appears in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
A Word of Explanation
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
In the tale, Sir Launcelot kills two giants, rescuing the dozens of young ladies they imprisoned. Later that night, he... (full context)
Chapter 3: Knights of the Table Round
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...finds them loveable and attractive for their simple-hearted natures. Many, including King Arthur, and Sir Launcelot are fine examples of manliness. (full context)
Nature vs. Nurture  Theme Icon
...came from Kay, but Kay himself sets the record straight. These men were captured by Launcelot when he was in Kay’s armor. What’s more, the ones in the hall are just... (full context)
Chapter 9: The Tournament
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
...of his armor each time he returns to the field. King Arthur then suggests that Launcelot challenge Gareth, but Launcelot declines, arguing that it would be cruel to defeat a knight... (full context)
Chapter 26: The First Newspaper
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...through on his scheduled “king’s-evil business” first. No one expects Guenever to miss Arthur much (Launcelot is in the Valley), but he can’t disappoint the sick people who want the king... (full context)
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
Nature vs. Nurture  Theme Icon
...are familiar to Hank, but they now sound discordant to him. He reads about Sir Launcelot defeating King Agrivance of Ireland; a search for the missing Sir Sagramore; and the adventures... (full context)
Chapter 37: An Awful Predicament
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...he taps out a coded message, telling Clarence what’s happened and asking him to send Launcelot and 500 knights to spring them from jail. Launcelot will be able to recognize Hank... (full context)
Chapter 38: Sir Launcelot and the Knights to the Rescue
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
Hank waves his (cloth-wrapped) right arm wildly in the air, drawing Launcelot’s attention, extricates Arthur from the noose and blindfold and shouts that anyone who fails to... (full context)
Chapter 40: Three Years Later
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
Imperialism  Theme Icon
...his jokes, Sandy rushes in. Hank and Sandy’s daughter, Hello-Central, is seriously ill with croup. Launcelot, on his way to the Round Table (which is now the stock exchange) is distressed... (full context)
Chapter 42: War!
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
...quarters. Clarence recognizes his boss instantly, despite the disguise. He tells Hank that Guenever and Launcelot’s ongoing affair precipitated the disaster. Launcelot shorted a bunch of stocks, which cost Sir Agravaine... (full context)
Imperialism  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
The Church tried to broker a peace, but Sir Gawaine insisted on making Launcelot pay for the accidental deaths of two of Gawaine’s brothers. Arthur agreed to join Gawaine’s... (full context)