A Man for All Seasons

by

Robert Bolt

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Lord Chancellor is a position in the English government. Cardinal Wolsey begins the play as Chancellor, but after his death Thomas More takes over. The Chancellor was an advisor to the King, and was also known as “Keeper of the King’s Conscience.” This is why, when Thomas More refuses to sign the Act of Supremacy because of his conscience, the King is so upset, because it makes him feel as though he should have a guilty conscience. The Chancellor wears a special decorative chain symbolizing his position. More’s eventual removal of the chain demonstrates that he is giving up his position.
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Lord Chancellor Term Timeline in A Man for All Seasons

The timeline below shows where the term Lord Chancellor appears in A Man for All Seasons. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1
Financial vs. Moral Richness Theme Icon
Conscience, Integrity, and Reputation Theme Icon
...why Wolsey called More to meet. They tell More that Norfolk thinks More will be Chancellor if Wolsey dies. More tells them he doesn’t want to be Chancellor, and refuses to... (full context)
Friendship Theme Icon
...to court affairs, and tells More he is grateful he has “a friend for my Chancellor,” although More is “readier to be friends…than he was to be Chancellor.” (full context)
Act 2
Conscience, Integrity, and Reputation Theme Icon
...quickly Roper’s religious allegiance has shifted. Roper calls More’s decorative chain, a symbol of his Chancellorship, “a degradation.” (full context)
The Meaning of Silence Theme Icon
Conscience, Integrity, and Reputation Theme Icon
...word, More is committed to resigning from his post, and asks for help removing his Chancellor chain. Only Margaret will help him. More sees the creation of the Church of England... (full context)
Financial vs. Moral Richness Theme Icon
Cromwell explains that the King is displeased both by More’s silence and his resignation as Chancellor, but says the King would reward him for blessing the divorce. More is not moved... (full context)