A Moveable Feast

James Joyce is one of the most important writers of the era. He lives in Paris and dines at Michaud’s (an expensive restaurant) with his wife, Nora, and their children. Hemingway looks up to him, and Gertrude Stein refuses to be friends with him because she feels too competitive with him.
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James Joyce Character Timeline in A Moveable Feast

The timeline below shows where the character James Joyce appears in A Moveable Feast. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 3: Shakespeare and Company
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...checks out books by Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and D.H. Lawrence. Hemingway asks Sylvia when James Joyce comes in, and Sylvia tells him that it is usually in the afternoons. Hemingway admits... (full context)
Chapter 5: A False Spring
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...at Michaud’s, which to them is “an exciting and expensive restaurant.” There they see James Joyce, his wife Nora, and their two children, who are all speaking Italian to each other.... (full context)
Chapter 7: “Une Génération Perdue”
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...she will say nice things about others as people. Hemingway knows not to mention James Joyce, explaining that “if you brought up Joyce twice, you would not be invited back.” At... (full context)
Chapter 13: The Man Who Was Marked for Death
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...of oysters anyway. The two men note that Ezra is a wonderful poet, and that Joyce is “great,” although it is a shame his eyes are not better. Hemingway remarks that... (full context)
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...female co-editor of This Quarter, whose name Hemingway does not mention. Years later, Hemingway meets Joyce on the Boulevard St.-German and the two men have a drink. Joyce asks if Walsh... (full context)