After the Race

by

James Joyce

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Farley is an American and is described as being a “short fat man.” He, like the other characters, serves as a symbol for his home country. He knows André Rivière, although their connection is never explained. His yacht, where the men gamble, is named after Newport, a city in Rhode Island that was famous for the many rich “robber barons” who lived there. Given both the possession of a yacht and its namesake, Farley is presumably an extremely wealthy man. When the group plays cards, Farley and Jimmy Doyle are “the heaviest losers,” which might at first suggest that the United States is also a loser when competing with other countries. But given Farley’s immense wealth, it is likely that his losses won’t affect him as much as Jimmy’s will affect Jimmy. The story, then, seems to portray Americans as being crass and unsophisticated compared to the Europeans, and yet also so wealthy and powerful that it doesn’t matter.

Farley Quotes in After the Race

The After the Race quotes below are all either spoken by Farley or refer to Farley. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Ireland at the Beginning of the 20th Century Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Classics edition of After the Race published in 1993.
After the Race Quotes

Play ran very high and paper began to pass. Jimmy did not know exactly who was winning but he knew that he was losing. But it was his own fault for he frequently mistook his cards and the other men had to calculate his I.O.U.’s for him. They were devils of fellows but he wished they would stop: it was getting late.

Related Symbols: The Card Game
Page Number: 41
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire After the Race LitChart as a printable PDF.
After the Race PDF

Farley Character Timeline in After the Race

The timeline below shows where the character Farley appears in After the Race. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
After the Race
Ireland at the Beginning of the 20th Century Theme Icon
Capitalism, Commodification, and Amorality Theme Icon
...“[wears] the mask of a capital.” Suddenly, the group crosses paths with an American named Farley, whom Rivière appears to know. The group of now six men is talking so loudly... (full context)
Wealth and Greed vs. Citizenship Theme Icon
Capitalism, Commodification, and Amorality Theme Icon
...dance. Jimmy merrily joins in and thinks that “this [is] seeing life, at least.” Eventually, Farley gets worn out and stops the dancing. They settle down for a small supper, but... (full context)
Ireland at the Beginning of the 20th Century Theme Icon
Wealth and Greed vs. Citizenship Theme Icon
Capitalism, Commodification, and Amorality Theme Icon
Jimmy, Ségouin, Rivière, Farley, and Routh begin to play cards while Villona plays the piano. The games continue end-to-end... (full context)
Ireland at the Beginning of the 20th Century Theme Icon
Wealth and Greed vs. Citizenship Theme Icon
Capitalism, Commodification, and Amorality Theme Icon
...outside on the deck. At last, Routh wins the game, and the debts are settled: Farley and Jimmy are the biggest losers. Jimmy rests his head in his hands, beginning to... (full context)