All American Boys

by

Jason Reynolds

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Paul Galluzzo Character Analysis

Paul is Guzzo’s older brother. Like Guzzo, he is an “enormous,” powerfully-built white man. After Quinn’s father’s death, he promised to support Quinn and has acted as a father figure to him. Inspired by Quinn’s dad, he decides to be a police officer in order to make a difference. However, rather than having a positive impact on the world, he violently beats Rashad while arresting him for a crime he didn’t commit. After the incident, Paul refuses to admit any wrongdoing and demands loyalty from those around him.

Paul Galluzzo Quotes in All American Boys

The All American Boys quotes below are all either spoken by Paul Galluzzo or refer to Paul Galluzzo . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Atheneum edition of All American Boys published in 2015.
6. Sunday: Quinn Quotes

I felt like such an ass. I'd quickly convinced myself I had no idea who that kid with Paul was that night. And yeah, there were like a thousand kids in each grade at school, or whatever, but I did know him. Or know of him, really. I'd seen him––Rashad––in that uniform, and it'd made me think of my dad wearing his own at college. How my dad had looked proud in all those pictures.

Related Characters: Quinn Collins (speaker), Rashad Butler , Paul Galluzzo , Quinn’s Father
Related Symbols: Uniforms
Page Number: 108
Explanation and Analysis:
7. Monday: Quinn Quotes

“I mean, it's Paul. This is the same guy I’ve seen carrying my mom up the front steps, for God's sake.” I was thinking about that time Ma got trashed because it was her first wedding anniversary without Dad. Paul had been so

gentle. He'd taken the frigging day off just so she didn’t have to spend it alone. “She was tanked,” I said to Jill. “And he helped her home. I remember him putting her down on the couch and pulling the afghan over her.”

“Paulie's always been the good guy.”

“That's what I want to think.”

Related Characters: Quinn Collins (speaker), Jill (speaker), Paul Galluzzo , Ma, Quinn’s Father
Page Number: 129
Explanation and Analysis:
9. Tuesday: Quinn Quotes

Now I was thinking about how, if I wanted to, I could walk away and not think about Rashad, in a way that English or Shannon or Tooms or any of the guys at school who were not white could not. Even if they didn't know Rashad, even if for some reason, they hated Rashad, they couldn’t just

ignore what happened to him; they couldn't walk away. They were probably afraid, too. Afraid of people like Paul. Afraid of cops in general. Hell, they were probably afraid of people like me. I didn’t blame them. I'd be afraid too, even if I was a frigging house like Tooms. But I didn't have to be because

my shield was that I was white. It didn't matter that I knew Paul. I could be all the way across the country in California and I'd still be white, cops and everyone else would still see me as just a “regular kid,” an “All-American” boy. “Regular.” “All American.” White. Fuck.

Page Number: 180
Explanation and Analysis:
12. Wednesday: Rashad Quotes

My dad, my dad, had paralyzed an unarmed kid, a black kid, and I had had no

idea. My dad shot a kid. I mean, to me, my father was the model of discipline and courage. Sure, he was stern, and sometimes judgmental, but I always felt like he meant well. But to that kid––and now my head was reeling––to that kid, my dad was no different than Officer Galluzzo. Another trigger-happy cop who was quick to assume and even quicker to shoot.

Page Number: 234
Explanation and Analysis:
13. Thursday: Quinn Quotes

I did not want to be a hero. I did not want to make any of what had happened in the last week about me. There was a guy who'd just spent six days in the hospital because the guy who'd been my personal hero for four years had put him there.

Related Characters: Quinn Collins (speaker), Rashad Butler , Paul Galluzzo
Page Number: 266
Explanation and Analysis:

I'd been thinking about that all day, but I didn’t have the words for it until Ma brought up Dad. Everybody wanted me to be loyal. Ma wanted me to be loyal. Guzzo wanted me to be loyal. Paul wanted me to be loyal. Your dad was loyal to the end, they'd all tell me. Loyal to his country, loyal to his family, they meant. But it wasn't about loyalty. It was about him standing up for what he believed in. And I wanted to be my dad's son. Someone who believed a better world was possible––someone who stood up for it.

Related Characters: Quinn Collins (speaker), Paul Galluzzo , Ma, Quinn’s Father, Guzzo
Page Number: 267
Explanation and Analysis:
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Paul Galluzzo Character Timeline in All American Boys

The timeline below shows where the character Paul Galluzzo appears in All American Boys. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
2. Friday: Quinn
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
...also attends Springfield Central High. Quinn then notices that the cop is Guzzo’s older brother, Paul. Quinn stares, frozen in shock. He hears sirens approaching and runs back to Guzzo and... (full context)
4. Saturday: Quinn
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
...he couldn’t bring himself to enjoy Jill’s party. He is haunted by the image of Paul beating Rashad; in this moment, Paul was unrecognizable, like an entirely different person. Quinn sleeps... (full context)
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
...Quinn shouts encouragement. Guzzo texts to say he has a terrible hangover. He adds that Paul is home and that what happened at Jerry’s is “a big deal.” Guzzo’s family are... (full context)
5. Sunday: Rashad
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
...of Rashad’s face, along with the face and name of the officer who arrested him: Paul Galluzzo. (full context)
6. Sunday: Quinn
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
...announces the arrival of her marshmallow pie, everyone cheers. However, as soon as Quinn sees Paul he feels tense. Paul and Guzzo are standing side by side, and Quinn is struck... (full context)
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
...admits that although he doesn’t know what Rashad did, the whole incident was “ugly” and Paul “kicked the shit out of him.”  (full context)
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
Jill says she heard that Rashad resisted arrest, and asks if Paul saw Quinn at the time. Before Quinn can answer, Paul yells at Quinn to stop... (full context)
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
Although Paul is acting friendly, he is also suspicious of Quinn and comments that he seems “uptight.”... (full context)
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
Paul says, “Thanks, Ma,” revealing that he has been listening to the whole conversation. Suddenly, the... (full context)
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
The teams are Paul and Guzzo against Quinn and Dwyer. While they play, Paul becomes increasingly aggressive with Quinn,... (full context)
7. Monday: Quinn
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
...tell Jill this, Quinn has been avoiding him. Jill says that Mrs. Galluzzo’s defense of Paul “bugged the hell out of me.” Jill tells Quinn he should watch the video, but... (full context)
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
Suddenly, Quinn remembers a time when, years ago, Paul had “kicked the shit out of” a kid called Marc Blair. However, that time Paul... (full context)
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
After lunch, Quinn thinks about when Paul beat up Marc. Marc was an older kid who bullied Quinn; he once pressed Quinn’s... (full context)
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Someone else in class says “Paul Galluzzo.” Quinn is angry; he thinks that talking about Rashad’s arrest just makes it worse.... (full context)
9. Tuesday: Quinn
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
...white boys, including Guzzo and Dwyer. Guzzo beckons Quinn over, which irritates Quinn. Quinn remembers Paul telling him that Springfield used to be 85% white, but that it is now only... (full context)
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
...implores Guzzo to think about Rashad and his family, but Guzzo remains aggressively defensive of Paul, and reminds Quinn of all the things Paul has done for him. Guzzo leaves, and... (full context)
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
...idea you were such a dick.” After English walks away, Guzzo thanks Quinn for supporting Paul. However, when Guzzo tries to joke about the graffiti, Quinn grows annoyed, which angers Guzzo... (full context)
10. Tuesday: Rashad
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
...he was handcuffed. This is followed by another interview with a man who claims that Paul was right to do what he did. Rashad is dismayed by the second interviewee’s views,... (full context)
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
...not a criminal, and Rashad can sense her anger. She repeats: “This is not okay.” Paul Galluzzo is shown on the TV, and Jessica calls him an “asshole,” which shocks Rashad,... (full context)
11. Wednesday: Quinn
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
...feels like he is in a “daze.” While taking Willy to school, he bumps into Paul Galluzzo, who looks exhausted. Quinn is alarmed by his instinctive feelings of sympathy for Paul.... (full context)
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
After practice, Guzzo once again defends Paul to Quinn, saying he was “just doing his job.” He asks Quinn what he would... (full context)
13. Thursday: Quinn
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
...at the Galluzzos’ house, and remembers the day he stood there during his father’s funeral. Paul had told him that if he ever needed anything at all, he should come to... (full context)
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
...seen the video; she hasn’t, and claims that the video has been released to make Paul look like a “fool.” She asks what Quinn’s father would think, and Quinn replies that... (full context)
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American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
Paul had announced that he was going to become a cop when Quinn was in ninth... (full context)
15. Friday: Quinn
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
American Culture, Values, and Patriotism Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Heroes vs. Villains Theme Icon
...that for just one day she is going to share that fear. She notes that Paul, Guzzo, and her mom all “hate” her, but that she is determined to be on... (full context)
16. Friday: Rashad
Racism, Stereotyping, and Police Brutality Theme Icon
Fathers and Sons Theme Icon
Maturity, Discipline, and Responsibility Theme Icon
...his nose. Although he is embarrassed by the lump, he wants people to see what Paul did to him and know that he will be “different, forever.” (full context)