Arc of Justice

Arc of Justice

by

Kevin Boyle

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African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church Term Analysis

The African Methodist Episcopal Church is a Protestant sect of the Christian faith. It was the first independent Protestant denomination founded by Black people, who broke from the Methodist Church in protest over racism, slavery, and segregation. The AME Church emphasizes public service, education, thrift, and economic advancement in addition to its standard Christian theology. It was an important partner in the American government’s Reconstruction programs following the Civil War, founding schools like Ossian Sweet’s alma mater, Wilberforce University, and giving formerly enslaved people the education and tools necessary for participation in American society.

African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church Quotes in Arc of Justice

The Arc of Justice quotes below are all either spoken by African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church or refer to African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. For each quote, you can also see the other terms and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Prejudice, Segregation, and Society Theme Icon
).
Chapter 2 Quotes

So the revolution had come. Eight years earlier, the DeVaughn brothers had been pieces of property. Now they were men who demanded respect: missionaries of the Word, spreading the gospel to their fellow freedmen; aspiring farmers, working to earn a share of the American dream. They were still poor, still landless, still struggling to be equal to whites in fact as well as in name. But they had come so very far, there was every reason to be hopeful […] What must have run through Gilla’s mind as she cradled her granddaughter in her leathery arms? This child wouldn’t be like her babies, who had been born into a world now dead and gone. This child would have a future all her own.

Page Number: 54
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 9 Quotes

Ossian didn’t have to testify. No one could have objected to his refusing, so great was the responsibility: if he said the wrong word, put the wrong inflection in his voice, sat in a way that struck the jurors as too casual or too confident, grew rattled under cross-examination, succumbed to a single flash of anger, whatever sympathy Darrow and Hays had won for the defendants could be lost, the entire defense destroyed. But Ossian didn’t refuse. Undoubtedly he agreed out of pride—the intoxicating sense that in the past few weeks he had become the representative of his race and the champion of its rights—and, as always, out of obligation. He would do what his lawyers wanted him to do, what his wife and brothers and friends needed him to do, what his colleagues surely expected him to do. He had no choice, really, but to take the stand.

Page Number: 288
Explanation and Analysis:
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African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church Term Timeline in Arc of Justice

The timeline below shows where the term African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church appears in Arc of Justice. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2: Ain’t No Slavery No More
Prejudice, Segregation, and Society Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
...Reconstruction to fruition were many priests and pastors, including representatives of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. The AME broke from the mainstream Methodist Church when congregations began to enforce racial... (full context)
Prejudice, Segregation, and Society Theme Icon
Self-Defense, Race, and Ownership Theme Icon
The DeVaughn family embraced the AME’s message. Two sons entered the ministry, and the whole family became sharecroppers together on one... (full context)
Prejudice, Segregation, and Society Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
...and Henry’s 10 children helped on the farm. The parents raised their children in the AME tradition, with its emphasis on self-discipline, hard work, and religious faith. They taught their children... (full context)
Prejudice, Segregation, and Society Theme Icon
...a mob gathered to march on the home where he lived with his sister, the AME church issued a statement condemning his actions and proclaiming their solidarity with the white mob.... (full context)
Chapter 3: Migration
Prejudice, Segregation, and Society Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
...offers a four-year preparatory curriculum for students who, like Ossian, didn’t attend high school. The AME owns and operates the school, and a scholarship promises Ossian a free education. (full context)
Prejudice, Segregation, and Society Theme Icon
...the first college for free Black students. It was controlled by white people until the AME purchased it in 1863. By the time Ossian arrives, segregation and chronic underfunding mean that... (full context)
Chapter 4: Uplift Me, Pride
Prejudice, Segregation, and Society Theme Icon
Self-Defense, Race, and Ownership Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
...community, joining fraternal organizations like the Elks and the Masons, and starting to attend Ebenezer AME Church. His connections earn him the role of medical examiner for an insurance company, vastly... (full context)