Barracoon

by

Zora Neale Hurston

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Kossula / Cudjo Lewis Character Analysis

The book’s narrator, a West African man brought to America as a slave in 1859, and the last known survivor of the Middle Passage. As he recounts to Zora Neale Hurston in the 1920s, Cudjo grows up in a small West African village, nurtured by a large family network. He’s a teenager looking forward to assuming the jobs of an adult man when, during a raid on his village by the neighboring kingdom of Dahomey, he is captured and sold to an American slave trader. Brought forcibly to America, Cudjo endures five years of slavery on an Alabama plantation before he is liberated by the Civil War, after which he cooperates with other ex-slaves to build a village, marries Seely, and has six children. Cudjo is a gifted storyteller with a good memory, as his evocative narration to Hurston proves. He is both defined and unbroken by the suffering he’s experienced; although he speaks of his life freely and bluntly to Hurston, he sometimes stops to weep when describing particularly awful episodes. Cudjo has resigned himself to life in America, becoming a sexton and respected elder in Africatown, as well as a devoted Christian; however, he longs deeply for Africa, mourns his lost life there, and tries to keep his native culture alive as much as possible. In this sense, he represents the complex identities and cultural uncertainty experienced by victims of colonization and the slave trade. Cudjo is also a devoted husband and father, seeking to recreate his lost African family through the one he builds in America; however the death of his wife and children demonstrate the limits of security and prosperity that can be achieved by a black family in post-Civil War America. By the end of the novel, he emerges as a proud but fundamentally lonely representative of one of history’s great tragedies; to Hurston, he serves as a link between African Americans striving for success and equality in a racist country and their disrupted African heritage.

Kossula / Cudjo Lewis Quotes in Barracoon

The Barracoon quotes below are all either spoken by Kossula / Cudjo Lewis or refer to Kossula / Cudjo Lewis. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Amistad edition of Barracoon published in 2018.
Chapter 1 Quotes

Thankee Jesus! Somebody come ast about Cudjo! I want tellee somebody who I is, so maybe dey go in de Afficky soil some day and callee my name and somebody dere say, “Yeah, I know Kossula.” I want you everwhere you go to tell everybody whut Cudjo say, and how come I in Americky soil since de 1859 and never see my people no mo’.

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker)
Page Number: 19
Explanation and Analysis:

In de Affica soil I cain tellee you ‘bout de son before I tellee you ‘bout de father; and derefore, you unnerstand me, I cain talk about de man who is father (et te) till I tellee you bout de man who he father to him, (et, te, te, grandfather) now, dass right ain’ it?

Page Number: 21
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 2 Quotes

But people watch until he die too. How long it take? Sometime he die next day. Sometime two or three days. He doan live long. People kin stand de smell of de horse, de cow and udder beasts, but no man kin stand de smell in his nostrils of a rotten man.

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker)
Page Number: 32
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

I tellee you whut I know about de juju […] Cudjo doan know. Now, dat’s right. I doan make out I know whut go on wid de grown folks. When I come away from Afficky I only a boy 19 year old. I have one initiation. A boy must go through many initiations before he become a man.

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker)
Page Number: 41
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 6 Quotes

Oh Lor’, I so shame! We come in de ‘Merica soil naked and de people say we naked savage. Dey say we doan wear no clothes. Dey doan know de Many-costs snatch our clothes ‘way from us.

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker)
Related Symbols: Boats and the Middle Passage
Page Number: 55
Explanation and Analysis:

We lookee and lookee and lookee and lookee and we doan see nothin’ but water. Where we come from we doan know. Where we goin, we doan know.

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker)
Related Symbols: Boats and the Middle Passage
Page Number: 55
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

When we at de plantation on Sunday we so glad we ain’ gottee no work to do. So we dance lak in de Afficky soil. De American colored folks, you unnerstand me, dey say we savage an den de laugh at us […] Free George, he come to us and tell us not to dance on Sunday. Den he tell us whut Sunday is. We doan know whut is is before […] Den we doan dance no mo’ on de Sunday.

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker), Free George
Page Number: 62
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

Cap’n jump on his feet and say, ‘Fool do you think I goin’ give you property on top of property? I tookee good keer my slaves in slavery and derefo’ I doan owe dem nothing? You doan belong to me now, why must I give you my lan’?’

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker), Tim Meaher
Page Number: 67
Explanation and Analysis:

Den we make laws how to behave ourselves. When anyone do wrong we make him ‘pear befo’ de judges and dey tellee him he got to stop doin’ lak dat ‘cause it doan look nice. We doan want nobody to steal, neither gittee drunk neither hurtee nobody […] When we speak to a man whut do wrong de nexy time he do dat, we whip him.

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker)
Page Number: 68
Explanation and Analysis:

We call our village Affican Town. We say dat ‘cause we want to go back in de Affica soil and we see we cain go. Derefo’ we make de Affica where dey fetch us. Gumpa say, ‘My folks sell me and yo folks (Americans) buy me.’ We here and we got to stay.

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker), Gumpa
Page Number: 68
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 9 Quotes

We doan know nothin’ ‘bout dey have license over here in dis place. So den we gittee married by de license, but I doan love my wife no mo’ wid de license than I love her befo’ de license. She a good woman and I love her all de time.

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker), Abila / Seely
Page Number: 72
Explanation and Analysis:

All de time de chillum growin’ de American folks de picks at dem and tell de Afficky people dey kill folks and eatee de meat. Dey callee my chillum ig’nant savage and make out dey kin to monkey.

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker)
Page Number: 73
Explanation and Analysis:

Dat de first time in de Americky soil dat death find where my door is. But we from cross de water know dat he come in de ship with us.

Related Symbols: Boats and the Middle Passage
Page Number: 74
Explanation and Analysis:

Dey sing, ‘Shall We Meet Beyond De River.’ I been a member of de church a long time now, and I know de words of de song wid my mouth, but my heart it doan know dat. Derefo’ I sing inside me, ‘O todo ah wah n-law yah-lee, owrran k-nee ra ra k-nee ro ro.’

Page Number: 74
Explanation and Analysis:

It only nine year since my girl die. Look like I still hear de bell toll for her, when it toll again for my [Cudjo]. My po’ Affican boy dat doan never see Afficky soil.

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker), Cudjo Jr.
Page Number: 76
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 10 Quotes

I tell her come and drop de beans while I hill dem up […] After a while she say, ‘Cudjo you doan need me drop no beans. You cain work ‘thout no woman ‘round you. You bringee me here for company.’

I say, ‘Thass right.’

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker), Abila / Seely
Page Number: 78
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 11 Quotes

Poe-lee very mad. He say de deputy kill his baby brother. Den de train kill David. He want to do something. But I ain’ hold no malice. De Bible say not. Poe-lee say in Afficky soil it ain’ lak in de Americky. He ain’ been in de Afficky, you unnerstand me, but he hear what we tellee him and he think dat better dan where he at.

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker), David, Poe-lee, Cudjo Jr.
Page Number: 87
Explanation and Analysis:

Maybe de kill my boy. It a hidden mystery. So many de folks dey hate my boy ‘cause he lak his brothers. Dey doan let nobody ‘buse dem lak dey dogs. Maybe he in Afficky soil lak somebody say.

Related Characters: Kossula / Cudjo Lewis (speaker), Poe-lee
Page Number: 88
Explanation and Analysis:

When he came out I saw that he had put on his best suit but removed his shoes. “I want to look lak I in Affica, ‘cause dat where I want to be,” he explained.

He also asked to be photographed in the cemetery among the graves of his family.

Related Characters: Zora Neale Hurston (speaker), Kossula / Cudjo Lewis
Page Number: 89
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 12 Quotes

I had spent two months with Kossula, who is called Cudjo, trying to find the answers to my questions. Some days we ate great quantities of clingstone peaches and talked […] At other times neither was possible, he just chased me away. He wanted to work in his garden or fix his fences. He couldn’t be bothered.

Related Characters: Zora Neale Hurston (speaker), Kossula / Cudjo Lewis
Page Number: 93
Explanation and Analysis:

When I crossed the bridge, I know he went back to his porch; to his house full of thoughts. To his memories of fat girls with ringing golden bracelets, his drums that speak the minds of men, to palm-nut cakes and bull-roarers, to his parables.

Related Characters: Zora Neale Hurston (speaker), Kossula / Cudjo Lewis
Page Number: 94
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Barracoon LitChart as a printable PDF.
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Kossula / Cudjo Lewis Character Timeline in Barracoon

The timeline below shows where the character Kossula / Cudjo Lewis appears in Barracoon. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Introduction
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
Zora Neale Hurston begins her introduction, which gives some background information on Cudjo’s story, by declaring that “the African Slave trade is the most dramatic chapter in the... (full context)
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
Hurston first meets Cudjo in 1927, when her mentor, the anthropologist Franz Boas, dispatches her to record his experience... (full context)
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
Having done her research, Hurston sets out to find Cudjo, a man who calls himself “the tree of two woods.” He is the only person... (full context)
Chapter 1
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
It’s summer when Hurston first arrives at Cudjo’s house. She knows he’s at home because his gate is unlocked; he latches it with... (full context)
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
Cudjo explains that the other man is a caretaker who has been staying with him during... (full context)
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
After a while, Cudjo returns his attention to her, saying that sometimes he can’t help crying from loneliness. Hurston... (full context)
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
Eventually, Cudjo clarifies his previous statement. He says that in Africa his people always believed in the... (full context)
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
Hurston responds that she wants to know many things, from Cudjo’s captivity to his life as a free man. Cudjo cries again, thanking God that finally... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
Cudjo says that his real name is Kossula. When he arrived in America, his master Jim... (full context)
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
Cudjo begins to explain his origins in West Africa. His family doesn’t have “ivory by de... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
Worried that Cudjo is getting distracted, Hurston interrupts that she wants to hear about his life, not his... (full context)
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
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Cudjo explains that it wasn’t his grandfather’s idea to marry so many women. Rather, according to... (full context)
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
...the occasion by killing a cow and hosting a celebration for the whole village. In Cudjo’s grandfather’s compound, this happens many times. (full context)
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
Finishing this anecdote, Cudjo looks across his thriving garden to his daughter-in-law’s house. Hurston feels that he has forgotten... (full context)
Chapter 2
The American Dream Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
The next time Hurston visits Cudjo, she brings a basket of peaches. Cudjo’s great-granddaughters arrive at the same time, and he... (full context)
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
Coming another day, Hurston brings a bottle of insect repellant. This time, Cudjo is eager to talk to her, and he resumes his story where he left off,... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
...only adjudicates major crimes like murder, leaving minor issues like adultery to the local chiefs. Cudjo says that “everything be done open here,” meaning that every crime is addressed in the... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
For example, Cudjo remembers a case where one man has murdered another with a spear. The man is... (full context)
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
All day, the chiefs ask the murderer questions. Cudjo notes that, unlike in America, Africans can’t use insanity as a defense in criminal trials.... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
Cudjo explains that when the executioner touched the man, he declared him dead in the eyes... (full context)
Chapter 3
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Another important episode in Cudjo’s childhood is the death of his grandfather. Cudjo doesn’t remember why his grandfather died, but... (full context)
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
When Cudjo arrives with his father, all the wives remove their veils to greet him. The first... (full context)
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
Hurston notes that Cudjo now has “that remote look in his eyes,” and she knows that he’s done talking... (full context)
Chapter 4
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
Hurston stays away for a week, worrying the whole time that Cudjo won’t see her again. In order to make her visits more appealing, she brings two... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
Cudjo begins to explain more about his own family. His father, who was not wealthy, had... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
Hurston asks Cudjo if any women are infertile, but Cudjo says if anyone has trouble conceiving, they visit... (full context)
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
Cudjo spends his time in the compound, playing with all the other children. They compete in... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
When Cudjo is a teenager, the chief declares that all the boys over fourteen should assemble before... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Cudjo also learns to sing war drums, chanting with the other boys that “if we are... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Hurston asks Cudjo about the practice of juju, which he’s mentioned before. Seeming “reluctant,” Cudjo says he doesn’t... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Cudjo continues that one day, in the market place, he notices a pretty girl and follows... (full context)
Chapter 5
Family Theme Icon
Cudjo is very happy at this stage of his life and looking forward to being invited... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Cudjo says that a traitor from his kingdom, who was previously banished for unrelated crimes, goes... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
The Dahoman army breaks down the enormous gates surrounding the village. Leaping up, Cudjo sees soldiers holding French guns swarming the compound. There are female soldiers, as well, who... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Cudjo runs from gate to gate, but finds that each is surrounded by enemy soldiers. At... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Seeing the king dead, Cudjo tries to run away, but the soldiers catch him and tie him in a line... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
...stave off attack. By this time, the severed heads are beginning to rot and smell. Cudjo is anguished to see the bodies of people he knows treated this way. Eventually, the... (full context)
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
Cudjo stops talking, and Hurston says it feels that he’s no longer with her but “squatting... (full context)
Chapter 6
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
The next Saturday, Hurston visits Cudjo but he doesn’t have time to talk to her, saying that he has to clean... (full context)
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
...him about “the nice white lady in New York who was interested in him,” and Cudjo asks her to write the woman a letter thanking her on his behalf. Cudjo says... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
When they arrive at Dahomey, Cudjo sees the king’s house; it looks as if it is made of bones. People come... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
...can see ships in the ocean, but the view is obstructed by other buildings. Here, Cudjo sees white men for the first time; in his village, he has only ever heard... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Cudjo says that he and the other villagers are “not so sad now.” Because they are... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...works as servants to the Dahomans) load the captives into small boats. In the confusion, Cudjo is almost left on the shore, but he sees his friend on the boat and... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
When they reach the ships, the Kroos rob them of their clothes. Cudjo says he is ashamed, because he doesn’t want to arrive wherever he is going as... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
...around the deck until they recover the use of their limbs. In every direction, all Cudjo can see is water. He has no idea where he is going. (full context)
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
Cudjo suffers greatly onboard the Clotilda. He’s very scared by the constant noise and motion of... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
...the government doesn’t discover the ship is carrying slaves. At night, the ship moves again; Cudjo later learns that it is towed up the river to the island where the Meahers... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
...distraught to be separated once again. Everyone cries and sings a traditional song of mourning. Cudjo doesn’t know if he can withstand this grief; when he thinks about his mother, he... (full context)
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
Cudjo stops speaking and tells Hurston he’s tired of talking, and that she has to go... (full context)
Chapter 7
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Cudjo is part of the group of slaves claimed by Jim Meaher. He travels to Meaher’s... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
...often cruel to their slaves, forcing them to work especially long hours under violent overseers. Cudjo has never worked this hard, but he says “we doan grieve ‘bout dat. We cry... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Jim Meaher is kinder towards his slaves than his brothers. For example, he sees that Cudjo’s shoes are in pieces and gets him another pair. Cudjo has to work hard, but... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
Cudjo suddenly exclaims out loud, saying he’s so thankful that he’s free now. The slaves never... (full context)
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
...if he thinks they are working too slowly or haven’t taken a large enough load. Cudjo woefully exclaims, “Oh, Lor’,” remembering that he endured this life for five and a half... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
...Eventually they hear rumors that people in the North are fighting to free them, and Cudjo becomes hopeful even though he’s not completely sure that this is the purpose of the... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Cudjo describes the moment he’s officially freed, on April 12th, 1865. He’s working on the boat... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...until they figure out where to go and what to do. These questions don’t bother Cudjo; he’s just happy to be free again. (full context)
Chapter 8
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
...land for their village, after all the time they’ve worked without pay. The villagers appoint Cudjo to approach the brothers, because he “always talkee good.” (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
At this time, Cudjo is working in a mill operated by Tim Meaher, and one day the man sits... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Jumping up, Tim Meaher explodes, calling Cudjo a “fool” and says that he’s not going to “give you property on top of... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
Cudjo reports Meaher’s words to Gumpa and the others. They decide that now they must pool... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
Everyone helps to build each others’ houses on the land. At first, Cudjo doesn’t build one for himself, because he doesn’t have a wife. They name the village... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
...so they build their own church, which is still standing today. Concluding his story thus, Cudjo sends Hurston away for the day. (full context)
Chapter 9
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The next day, Hurston drives Cudjo to the bay to eat crabs. On the way, he begins to talk about his... (full context)
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
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Cudjo approaches Seely and says that he wants to marry her because “I ain’t got nobody.”... (full context)
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
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Sometime afterward, Cudjo and Seely convert to Christianity officially. In the church, they are told that it’s not... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
Cudjo and Seely have six children, five sons and one daughter. They are very happy during... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
...boys often get into fights, often beating other men. People visit the house and tell Cudjo that his boys are trouble and might one day kill someone. Cudjo responds that, just... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
However, Cudjo’s explanations don’t change the hostility towards his sons. People tell him that his boys “ain... (full context)
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Even though Cudjo loves his children deeply and does everything possible to help them, as a teenager Cudjo’s... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
...church and is buried in a coffin. Everyone gathers and sings an American hymn. Although Cudjo knows the words “wid my mouth,” in his heart he is singing a traditional mourning... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
Nine years later, a deputy sheriff kills Cudjo Jr. Cudjo is suspicious that this man isn’t even a law enforcement officer, because he... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
The man who killed young Cudjo jr. is now the pastor of a church in Plateau. Cudjo tries to forgive him,... (full context)
Chapter 10
The American Dream Theme Icon
Cudjo can’t take any action against the man who kills his son, both because the man... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
On the morning of the accident, Cudjo decides to plant beans in his garden. He asks Seely to come and help him,... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
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They don’t have enough seeds at home, so Cudjo decides to take his horse into Mobile to buy more. He asks Seely for some... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
After completing the errand, Cudjo turns toward home. However, just as he’s crossing the railroad track a train appears and... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
The woman suggests Cudjo hire a lawyer and sue the company. Cudjo visits a lawyer named Clarke in Mobile,... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
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After testifying, Cudjo is exhausted, so he goes to the market, planning to buy some meat and go... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
Cudjo sends David to collect the money, but Clarke tells him he doesn’t have it yet.... (full context)
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Cudjo never finds out where his settlement money went. He’s also still astonished and grateful that... (full context)
Chapter 11
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At the bay, some friends of Cudjo’s catch many crabs, which they all share. On the way home, Hurston buys some melons... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
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The next day, Cudjo tells her about the fates of his other children. One Easter Sunday, Cudjo and his... (full context)
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David leaves, and after a while Cudjo hears some people approaching the house. He assumes that David has brought a friend home,... (full context)
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Cudjo rushes into the town, hoping that in fact it’s not David who has been killed.... (full context)
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As the sexton of the church, Cudjo usually tolls the bell for the dead, but he won’t do so now or let... (full context)
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
The American Dream Theme Icon
Seely falls to the floor weeping and screaming; Cudjo is so overwhelmed that he runs into the forest. Some men who had crossed the... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
...day, all the townspeople come to the house for a viewing, and David is buried. Cudjo says that it’s as if “all de family hurry to leave and go sleep on... (full context)
Storytelling and Memory Theme Icon
Slavery and Racism Theme Icon
Poe-lee is particularly upset by his brother David’s death. He wants Cudjo to sue the railroad company again, but Cudjo points out that it didn’t work before... (full context)
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The American Dream Theme Icon
Cudjo and Seely try to talk to Poe-lee and persuade him to be satisfied with his... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
After telling about this, Cudjo pauses for a long time and cries a little before resuming his narrative. He says... (full context)
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Cudjo tries to be especially kind to Seely, who is distraught by the loss of her... (full context)
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...disappearance, Jimmy comes home sick one day. A few days later, he dies while holding Cudjo’s hand. Cudjo says that his children are “lonesome for one ‘nother,” and would rather “sleep... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
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After they bury Jimmy, Cudjo and Seely are alone in their house, which was once so full. They know that... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
Cultural Relativism Theme Icon
At the end of this session, Hurston asks permission to take Cudjo’s photograph. Three days later, she comes back with a camera. Cudjo is interested to see... (full context)
Chapter 12
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Cudjo brings his narrative to a close by saying that one night, Seely wakes up suddenly... (full context)
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...Seely dies, although she’s never shown any signs of illness. Seely doesn’t want to leave Cudjo, and she cries at the thought of his loneliness; but she needs to be wherever... (full context)
The American Dream Theme Icon
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The month after that, Cudjo’s one remaining son, Aleck, dies as well. Now he’s in the same state as when... (full context)
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One day, Ole Charlie, the oldest man from Africa still living in the town, visits Cudjo with some others and asks Cudjo to “make us a parable.” Cudjo addresses the group,... (full context)
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Another time, the group comes and asks for another story. Cudjo tells them that he and his wife are riding to Mount Vernon on the train,... (full context)
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By this time, Hurston has spent two months with Cudjo. Some days they eat a lot of fruit without talking about anything. Some days they... (full context)
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Leaving Cudjo’s house, Hurston turns back to see him standing at the edge of his land. Driving... (full context)