Bernice Bobs Her Hair

by

F. Scott Fitzgerald

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Warren McIntyre is Marjorie’s longtime friend and former childhood playmate, who aims to win her affections. A 19-year-old attending Yale University, he boasts of good looks, familial wealth, fine taste, a respectable name, and the interest of most girls his age. Consequently, his opinion of himself is rather high. He seeks the popular and attractive girls, and expects his attention to be met with flirting and flattery in turn. Warren’s opinion is critical to a fault, and decidedly fickle: initially he finds Bernice dull, but later he finds her an attractive prospect after she has won some measure of popularity. Likewise, only when he pursues Bernice does Marjorie, previously uncaring, show an interest in him. However, Warren just as soon drops Bernice when her haircut ruins her looks, despite having been one of the crowd pushing her to get her hair bobbed in the first place. Together with Marjorie, Warren illustrates the emptiness of social conquest for its own sake; the attention of someone so shallow and heartless, Fitzgerald seems to suggest, is hardly a prize worth seeking.

Warren McIntyre Quotes in Bernice Bobs Her Hair

The Bernice Bobs Her Hair quotes below are all either spoken by Warren McIntyre or refer to Warren McIntyre . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Social Competition Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Scribner edition of Bernice Bobs Her Hair published in 1995.
Part 1 Quotes

The main function of the balcony was critical. It occasionally showed grudging admiration, but never approval, for it is well known among ladies over thirty-five that when the younger set dance in the summer-time it is with the very worst intentions in the world, and if they are not bombarded with stony eyes stray couples will dance weird barbaric interludes in the corners, and the more popular, more dangerous girls will sometimes be kissed in the parked limousines of unsuspecting dowagers.

Related Characters: Warren McIntyre , Marjorie Harvey
Page Number: 25-26
Explanation and Analysis:

Warren fidgeted. Then with a sudden charitable impulse he decided to try part of his line on her. He turned and looked at her eyes.

“You’ve got an awfully kissable mouth,” he began quietly.

Related Characters: Warren McIntyre (speaker), Bernice
Page Number: 28
Explanation and Analysis:
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Warren McIntyre Character Timeline in Bernice Bobs Her Hair

The timeline below shows where the character Warren McIntyre appears in Bernice Bobs Her Hair. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1
Youth and Generational Difference Theme Icon
...watched, they will get up to lewd or indecent activities. Meanwhile, handsome young “stags” like Warren McIntyre feel that the party is, on the whole, too tame. The 19-year-old takes a... (full context)
Social Competition Theme Icon
Youth and Generational Difference Theme Icon
Warren’s thoughts come to rest on his longtime childhood friend, Marjorie Harvey, whose “fairylike face” and... (full context)
Social Competition Theme Icon
Warren finds Otis waiting for Bernice, making jokes to the crowd at her expense while she... (full context)
Social Competition Theme Icon
Gender and Femininity Theme Icon
Warren and Bernice take the next full dance together.  The conversation is limited to small talk—the... (full context)
Part 4
Social Competition Theme Icon
Later that evening, Warren McIntyre spies Bernice dancing with G. Reece Stoddard, only to have their dance cut in... (full context)
Social Competition Theme Icon
Gender and Femininity Theme Icon
...had achieved that night’s grand success. Her last thoughts before she falls asleep are of Warren. (full context)
Part 5
Social Competition Theme Icon
The chief marker of Bernice’s success is the attention of “the hypercritical Warren McIntyre,” who seems to have lost interest in Marjorie in favor of someone more accessible.... (full context)
Social Competition Theme Icon
Gender and Femininity Theme Icon
...The other teenagers question Bernice about it—and Bernice, backed into a corner, feeling pressure from Warren’s eyes “fixed on her questioningly,” eventually responds with the lie that “I like bobbed hair... (full context)
Social Competition Theme Icon
Gender and Femininity Theme Icon
...chair, as everyone realizes how ugly her hair looks now. With “serpentlike intensity,” Marjorie steals Warren’s company for that evening by asking his help with an errand. His eyes “rested coldly... (full context)
Part 6
Social Competition Theme Icon
Gender and Femininity Theme Icon
...happy and exuberant,” Bernice steps off the porch and leaves for home—and as she passes Warren McIntyre’s house, she tosses Marjorie’s braids onto his porch. “Scalp the selfish thing!” she giggles,... (full context)