Black Skin, White Masks

by

Frantz Fanon

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Négritude is an artistic and political movement founded by Aimé Césaire. Négritude writers embrace blackness as a single, global, diasporic identity (rather than aligning themselves with a particular ethnic or national black identity). They reject colonialism and use both Marxism and surrealism to show how art and literature can be used for revolutionary purposes.

Négritude Quotes in Black Skin, White Masks

The Black Skin, White Masks quotes below are all either spoken by Négritude or refer to Négritude. For each quote, you can also see the other terms and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Colonialism, Diaspora, and Alienation Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Grove Press edition of Black Skin, White Masks published in 2008.
Introduction Quotes

Less commonly he [the “educated black man”] wants to feel part of his people. And with feverish lips and frenzied heart he plunges into the great black hole. We shall see that this wonderfully generous attitude rejects the present and future in the name of a mystical past.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: xviii
Explanation and Analysis:
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Négritude Term Timeline in Black Skin, White Masks

The timeline below shows where the term Négritude appears in Black Skin, White Masks. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 5: The Lived Experience of the Black Man
Colonialism, Diaspora, and Alienation Theme Icon
Material vs. Psychological Oppression Theme Icon
Self-Image and Self-Hatred Theme Icon
Desire, Aspiration, and Competition Theme Icon
...quotations from Césaire’s Notebook of a Return to My Native Land, the central text of Négritude. He acknowledges the power of “black magic,” eros, and rhythm, but cautions that celebrating these... (full context)
Colonialism, Diaspora, and Alienation Theme Icon
Material vs. Psychological Oppression Theme Icon
Self-Image and Self-Hatred Theme Icon
Fanon moves on to quote Sartre’s critique of the fact that followers of Négritude tend to be “militant Marxists,” who substitute a focus on the issue of race for... (full context)
Chapter 6: The Black Man and Psychopathology
Colonialism, Diaspora, and Alienation Theme Icon
Material vs. Psychological Oppression Theme Icon
Self-Image and Self-Hatred Theme Icon
Desire, Aspiration, and Competition Theme Icon
Before Césaire and Négritude, most Antilleans did not even think of themselves as black. When black people encounter white... (full context)