Book of Job

by

Anonymous

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Book of Job can help.

God Character Analysis

Throughout the book, God is sometimes referred to as “the LORD” or “the Almighty.” The Israelites’ omnipotent deity, God has power and control over Satan—for instance, Satan can only cause harm when and where God permits it. Before Satan proposes tempting Job, God keeps a “fence” around Job to protect him, and it’s only with God’s permission that Satan can do Job any harm. To Job, God is a mysterious, even oppressive presence who, though all-powerful and present everywhere, seems to “hide his face,” making Job suffer for no clear reason. These characteristics make Job wish that he could speak to God face to face to plead his case, and yet, at the same time, he wishes that he could hide from God. God himself is silent through most of the book. After Job’s friends and Elihu have finished speaking, God addresses Job overwhelmingly from “out of the whirlwind.” He interrogates Job, naming various mysteries of creation and commanding Job to explain them, if Job is so wise. He also condemns the folly of Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar, but he pardons the men after Job prays on their behalf. At the end of the book, God restores Job’s fortunes, giving him twice as much as he had before. In the end, God doesn’t specifically answer Job’s questions about the purpose of his suffering, but Job humbly submits to God’s unknowable wisdom and majesty—the book’s overarching emphasis.

God Quotes in Book of Job

The Book of Job quotes below are all either spoken by God or refer to God. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Oxford University Press edition of Book of Job published in 2001.
Chapter 1 Quotes

There was once a man in the land of Uz whose name was Job. That man was blameless and upright, one who feared God and turned away from evil. There were born to him seven sons and three daughters. He had seven thousand sheep, three thousand camels, five hundred yoke of oxen, five hundred donkeys, and very many servants; so that this man was the greatest of all the people of the east. His sons used to go and hold feasts in one another's houses in turn; and they would send and invite their three sisters to eat and drink with them. And when the feast days had run their course, Job would send and sanctify them, and he would rise early in the morning and offer burnt offerings according to the number of them all; for Job said, “It may be that my children have sinned, and cursed God in their hearts.” This is what Job always did.

Related Characters: Job, God
Page Number: 1:1-5
Explanation and Analysis:

The Lord said to Satan, “Have you considered my servant Job? There is no one like him on the earth, a blameless and upright man who fears God and turns away from evil.” Then Satan answered the Lord, “Does Job fear God for nothing? Have you not put a fence around him and his house and all that he has, on every side? You have blessed the work of his hands, and his possessions have increased in the land. But stretch out your hand now, and touch all that he has, and he will curse you to your face.”

Related Characters: God (speaker), Satan (speaker), Job
Page Number: 1:8–12
Explanation and Analysis:

Then Job arose, tore his robe, shaved his head, and fell on the ground and worshiped. He said, “Naked I came from my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return there; the Lord gave, and the Lord has taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord.”

In all this Job did not sin or charge God with wrongdoing.

Related Characters: Job (speaker), God
Page Number: 1:20–22
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 2 Quotes

So Satan went out from the presence of the Lord, and inflicted loathsome sores on Job from the sole of his foot to the crown of his head. Job took a potsherd with which to scrape himself, and sat among the ashes.

Then his wife said to him, “Do you still persist in your integrity? Curse God, and die.” But he said to her, “You speak as any foolish woman would speak. Shall we receive the good at the hand of God, and not receive the bad?” In all this Job did not sin with his lips.

Related Characters: Job’s Wife (speaker), Job (speaker), God, Satan
Page Number: 2:7–10
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 3 Quotes

After this Job opened his mouth and cursed the day of his birth. Job said:

“Let the day perish in which I was born,
and the night that said,
‘A man-child is conceived.’
Let that day be darkness!
May God above not seek it,
or light shine on it.”

Related Characters: Job (speaker), God
Page Number: 3:1–4
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

How happy is the one whom God reproves;
therefore do not despise the discipline of the Almighty.

For he wounds, but he binds up;
he strikes, but his hands heal.

[…]

See, we have searched this out; it is true.
Hear, and know it for yourself.

Related Characters: Eliphaz the Temanite (speaker), Job, God
Page Number: 5:17–27
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 6 Quotes

Those who withhold kindness from a friend
forsake the fear of the Almighty.

My companions are treacherous like a torrent-bed,
like freshets that pass away,
that run dark with ice,
turbid with melting snow.

In time of heat they disappear;
when it is hot, they vanish from their place.

Related Characters: Job (speaker), God, Eliphaz the Temanite
Page Number: 6:14–17
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

What are human beings, that you make so much of them,
that you set your mind on them,
visit them every morning,
test them every moment?

Will you not look away from me for a while,
let me alone until I swallow my spittle?

If I sin, what do I do to you, you watcher of humanity?

Related Characters: Job (speaker), God
Page Number: 7:17–21
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 9 Quotes

He is wise in heart, and mighty in strength
—who has resisted him, and succeeded?—
he who removes mountains, and they do not know it,
when he overturns them in his anger;
[…]
who alone stretched out the heavens
and trampled the waves of the Sea;
who made the Bear and Orion,
the Pleiades and the chambers of the south;
who does great things beyond understanding,
and marvelous things without number.

Look, he passes by me, and I do not see him;
he moves on, but I do not perceive him.

Related Characters: Job (speaker), God
Page Number: 9:4-11
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 12 Quotes

But ask the animals, and they will teach you;
the birds of the air, and they will tell you;
ask the plants of the earth, and they will teach you;
and the fish of the sea will declare to you.

Who among all these does not know
that the hand of the Lord has done this?

In his hand is the life of every living thing
and the breath of every human being.

Related Characters: Job (speaker), God, Zophar the Naamathite
Page Number: 12:7-10
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 13 Quotes

Let me have silence, and I will speak,
and let come on me what may.

I will take my flesh in my teeth,
and put my life in my hand.

See, he will kill me; I have no hope;
but I will defend my ways to his face.

Related Characters: Job (speaker), God
Page Number: 13:13-15
Explanation and Analysis:

Only grant two things to me,
then I will not hide myself from your face:

withdraw your hand far from me,
and do not let dread of you terrify me.

Then call, and I will answer;
or let me speak, and you reply to me.

[…]

Why do you hide your face,
and count me as your enemy?

Will you frighten a windblown leaf
and pursue dry chaff?

Related Characters: Job (speaker), God
Page Number: 13:20-25
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 19 Quotes

For I know that my Redeemer lives,
and that at the last he will stand upon the earth;
and after my skin has been thus destroyed,
then in my flesh I shall see God,
whom I shall see on my side,
and my eyes shall behold, and not another.

Related Characters: Job (speaker), God
Page Number: 19:25-27
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 22 Quotes

Agree with God, and be at peace;
in this way good will come to you.

Receive instruction from his mouth,
and lay up his words in your heart.

If you return to the Almighty, you will be restored,
if you remove unrighteousness from your tents,
[…]
and if the Almighty is your gold
and your precious silver,
then you will delight yourself in the Almighty,
and lift up your face to God.

Related Characters: Eliphaz the Temanite (speaker), God, Job
Page Number: 22:21-26
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 23 Quotes

If I go forward, he is not there;
or backward, I cannot perceive him;
on the left he hides, and I cannot behold him;
I turn to the right, but I cannot see him.

But he knows the way that I take;
when he has tested me, I shall come out like gold.

Related Characters: Job (speaker), God
Page Number: 23:8-10
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 26 Quotes

By his power he stilled the Sea;
by his understanding he struck down Rahab.

By his wind the heavens were made fair;
his hand pierced the fleeing serpent.

These are indeed but the outskirts of his ways;
and how small a whisper do we hear of him!
But the thunder of his power who can understand?

Related Characters: Job (speaker), God
Page Number: 26:12-14
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 28 Quotes

God understands the way to it,
and he knows its place.

For he looks to the ends of the earth,
and sees everything under the heavens.

When he gave to the wind its weight,
and apportioned out the waters by measure;

[…]

then he saw [wisdom] and declared it;
he established it, and searched it out.

And he said to humankind,
‘Truly, the fear of the Lord, that is wisdom;
and to depart from evil is understanding.’”

Related Characters: Job (speaker), God (speaker)
Page Number: 28:23-28
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 32 Quotes

So these three men ceased to answer Job, because he was righteous in his own eyes. Then Elihu son of Barachel the Buzite, of the family of Ram, became angry. He was angry at Job because he justified himself rather than God; he was angry also at Job’s three friends because they had found no answer, though they had declared Job to be in the wrong. Now Elihu had waited to speak to Job, because they were older than he. But when Elihu saw that there was no answer in the mouths of these three men, he became angry.

Page Number: 32:1-5
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 38 Quotes

Then the Lord answered Job out of the whirlwind:

“Who is this that darkens counsel by words without knowledge?
Gird up your loins like a man,
I will question you, and you shall declare to me.”

Related Characters: God (speaker), Job
Related Symbols: Whirlwind
Page Number: 38:1-3
Explanation and Analysis:

Can you bind the chains of the Pleiades,
or loose the cords of Orion?

[…]

Who has put wisdom in the inward parts,
or given understanding to the mind?

Who has the wisdom to number the clouds?

Or who can tilt the waterskins of the heavens,
when the dust runs into a mass
and the clods cling together?

Related Characters: God (speaker), Job
Page Number: 38:31-38
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 41 Quotes

Can you draw out Leviathan with a fishhook,
or press down its tongue with a cord?

Can you put a rope in its nose,
or pierce its jaw with a hook?

[…]

Will you play with it as with a bird,
or will you put it on leash for your girls?

Related Characters: God (speaker), Job
Page Number: 41:1-5
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 42 Quotes

Then Job answered the Lord:

“I know that you can do all things,
and that no purpose of yours can be thwarted.

‘Who is this that hides counsel without knowledge?’
Therefore I have uttered what I did not understand,
things too wonderful for me, which I did not know.
[…]

therefore I despise myself,
and repent in dust and ashes.”

Related Characters: Job (speaker), God
Page Number: 42:1-6
Explanation and Analysis:

And the Lord restored the fortunes of Job when he had prayed for his friends; and the Lord gave Job twice as much as he had before. […] The Lord blessed the latter days of Job more than his beginning; and he had fourteen thousand sheep, six thousand camels, a thousand yoke of oxen, and a thousand donkeys. He also had seven sons and three daughters. […] After this Job lived one hundred and forty years, and saw his children, and his children’s children, four generations. And Job died, old and full of days.

Related Characters: Job, God
Page Number: 42:10-17
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Book of Job LitChart as a printable PDF.
Book of Job PDF

God Character Timeline in Book of Job

The timeline below shows where the character God appears in Book of Job. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
...man named Job lived in the land of Uz. Job was “blameless and upright”—he honored God and resisted evil. Job had seven sons and three daughters, as well as huge flocks... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
One day, Satan comes before the Lord. The Lord asks Satan what he’s been up to, and Satan reports that he’s been... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
...his robe, shaves his head, and falls to the ground in worship. He says, “The LORD gave, and the LORD has taken away; blessed be the name of the LORD.” In... (full context)
Chapter 2
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
One day, the heavenly beings assemble before God, and Satan joins them. The LORD asks Satan what he’s been up to, and Satan... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
...asks Job if he’s still maintaining his integrity—it would be better for him to “Curse God, and die.” But Job tells her that this is a foolish thing to say, and... (full context)
Chapter 4
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...But now that suffering has touched his life, Job is impatient. Shouldn’t he keep fearing God and maintaining his integrity? Eliphaz says that no innocent person has ever been afflicted by... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...nighttime vision. The vision spoke and asked if human beings can ever be perfect before God. In answer, the spirit said that even angels are imperfect; therefore, those “who live in... (full context)
Chapter 5
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
.../ just as sparks fly upward.” Because of all this, Eliphaz advises Job to seek God. God sends rain on the earth and takes care of the suffering; God thwarts the... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
The person who’s disciplined by God should be happy. Whenever God wounds a person, he also heals them. He redeems people... (full context)
Chapter 6
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...were weighed on a scale, they would be heavier than the sand of the sea. God’s poisoned arrows have struck him. He longs for God to grant him his desire—to let... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Job continues that those who withhold kindness from a friend do not respect God. He says that his friends are “treacherous,” like a raging stream. They disappear when things... (full context)
Chapter 7
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
...his “anguish” and “bitterness.” He feels like “the Sea, or the Dragon,” being guarded by God. When he tries to sleep, God sends nightmares. Job would rather be strangled to death... (full context)
Chapter 8
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...asks Job how long he’ll continue talking like this, his words “a great wind.” Does God ever pervert justice or fail to do what’s right? He tells Job that if Job... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...without water—otherwise, they will wither. It’s the same with the lives of those who forget God—their hope fails, and their confidence is like a spiderweb. God would never reject someone who... (full context)
Chapter 9
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...answers Bildad. He doesn’t disagree, yet how can a human being be considered righteous by God? God is wise and irresistibly mighty. He can move mountains, shaking the earth’s foundations. He... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
God will not restrain his anger, Job continues. So how can Job presume to answer him,... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
When Job tries to tell himself to cheer up, he nevertheless fears God’s condemnation. What is the point of arguing with him? God isn’t mortal, and Job can’t... (full context)
Chapter 10
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
Job continues his complaint—he hates his life. He wants to ask God why God finds it good to oppress him, seemingly siding with the wicked. Does he... (full context)
Chapter 11
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...asks if Job’s “babble” should go unanswered. Sure, Job claims he is innocent. But if God spoke, then Job would know the whole story. God actually punishes Job less harshly than... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Can Job discern God’s wisdom? It is higher than heaven and deeper than Sheol, longer than the earth and... (full context)
Chapter 12
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...things, too. Though he used to be considered just and blameless, someone with insight from God, he’s now a laughingstock. He complains that robbers and people who provoke God enjoy peace. (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
But everyone—even animals, birds, and fish—knows that it’s God who does this—all living things, including the breath of every human, is in God’s hand.... (full context)
Chapter 13
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Job says he is not inferior to Zophar; he knows everything his friend knows. It’s God Job wants to speak to—even to “argue his case” with. Job accuses his friends of... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
...that he can speak, no matter what happens to him as a result. Even if God kills him, he will defend himself before God. He knows he’ll be vindicated in the... (full context)
Chapter 14
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
...with trouble; they wither like a flower. Given that their lives are brief, and that God has determined the number of their days, God should look away from humans so that... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
Job wishes that God would just hide him in Sheol for a while, until God’s wrath has been exhausted.... (full context)
Chapter 15
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...answer with “windy knowledge,” using worthless words. He accuses Job of neglecting the fear of God—Job’s own words condemn him. Is Job, Eliphaz asks, the firstborn of humanity? Does he think... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...all their lives, constantly threatened by famine and violence. This is the consequence of defying God. The wicked’s wealth won’t last, and their lives will have nothing to show but evil. (full context)
Chapter 16
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
...“miserable comforters.” As for Job himself, whether he speaks or remains silent, his pain remains. God has mercilessly abandoned Job to the wicked and ungodly, even though Job’s hands and his... (full context)
Chapter 18
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...them. Surely this is what happens to the ungodly and to those who don’t know God. (full context)
Chapter 19
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
...been false, then that’s his affair; but in any case, Job is confident that it’s God who has wronged him. Even when Job calls on God for help, God continues to... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
...begs his friends to have pity on him and stop pursuing him to death like God does. Job wishes that his words could be written down, even engraved on a rock. (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
...seen on earth. Even after Job’s flesh has been destroyed, he believes he will see God on his side. He warns his friends that a judgment is coming. (full context)
Chapter 20
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...to look forward to. In the end, their wickedness will be revealed, as decreed by God. (full context)
Chapter 21
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
In fact, Job continues, the wicked even tell God to leave them alone, because they don’t want to know his ways. Serving God won’t... (full context)
Chapter 22
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...speaks up. He asks Job if even the wisest person can be of service to God. Does human righteousness bring God any pleasure? Anyway, is God rebuking Job because of his... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
God is in the heavens, Eliphaz points out, beyond the highest stars—so Job probably assumes that... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Eliphaz urges Job to “agree with God, and be at peace.” If he does this, spurning gold and regarding God as his... (full context)
Chapter 23
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
Job answers and says that he has a bitter complaint—God’s hand is heavy upon him. He wishes he knew where to find God, so he... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
However, no matter where Job goes—forward or backward, left or right—he cannot find God. At the same time, God knows Job’s path, and Job knows that when God has... (full context)
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
At the same time, Job knows that God does whatever he wants. Accordingly, God will also fulfill his plans for Job. When Job... (full context)
Chapter 24
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Job continues, wondering why God does not seem to be around at the right times. The wicked seize flocks; they... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
...actions will be hidden. Such people befriend darkness, and Sheol claims such sinners. Even if God seems to sustain them for a little while, they will ultimately be cut off. (full context)
Chapter 25
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Next, Bildad the Shuhite speaks. He says that dominion belongs to God, God’s armies are innumerable, and his light shines on everyone. With all that said, how... (full context)
Chapter 26
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...shades (the dead) and the waters beneath the earth tremble. Sheol is plainly visible to God, who “hangs the earth upon nothing,” collects water in the clouds, and establishes a boundary... (full context)
Chapter 27
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
Job speaks again and says that as long as God (who has embittered his soul) lives, and as long as there’s breath in Job’s nostrils,... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Job tells his friends he will teach them about the Almighty’s ways. (His friends have seen God’s hand for themselves, so why do they speak vainly?)... (full context)
Chapter 28
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Only God knows where wisdom can be found. In fact, he sees everything under the heavens. He... (full context)
Chapter 29
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Job speaks again, wishing he were once again in his prime, when God was his friend, and he was surrounded by his children. In those days, Job would... (full context)
Chapter 30
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
...has rejected. Yet to such men, Job has become a “byword” because of the way God has humbled him. The masses pursue him, eager for his ruin. (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
Job is racked with relentless pain. He feels that God has thrown him to the ground and that he has become like “dust and ashes.”... (full context)
Chapter 31
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
...ever neglected the poor, the widow, or the orphan, then he should suffer terrors at God’s hands. If he’s put his trust in gold, or rejoiced in his wealth, then he... (full context)
Chapter 32
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...son of Barachel the Buzite. Elihu is angry at Job for “justifying[] himself rather than God.” He’s also mad at Job’s three friends for failing to give Job a satisfactory answer. (full context)
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...finally speaks. He prefaces his statement by acknowledging that he is young, but that it’s God’s spirit, not one’s age, that makes for wisdom. On this basis, he implores the group... (full context)
Chapter 33
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...tells Job to hear his speech; his words will demonstrate his uprightness. The spirit of God compels him to speak, and Job must answer him if he can. Elihu summarizes Job’s... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Elihu continues that God speaks to humans in two special ways, though people don’t usually perceive it. The first... (full context)
Chapter 34
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...that Job “drinks up scoffing like water” and consorts with evildoers. He also says that God repays people according to their deeds and never perverts justice. Because God is in control... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
God’s eyes, Elihu continues, are always upon mortals, and he misses nothing; evildoers can’t find darkness... (full context)
Chapter 35
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
...out because of their suffering, seeking the strong’s help. But nobody calls for help from God, their Maker. And when the prideful cry out, God doesn’t heed them, either. How much... (full context)
Chapter 36
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Elihu keeps talking; he still has something to say on God’s behalf. God, he says, is mighty in every way. He doesn’t sustain the wicked but... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
The godless harbor anger and don’t turn to God for help, so they die shamefully. On the other hand, God “delivers the afflicted by... (full context)
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Elihu urges Job to praise God’s work. God is great, and mortals can’t fully know him; “the number of his years... (full context)
Chapter 37
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Elihu says that God’s thundering voice causes his heart to tremble. God unleashes lightning across the earth, and his... (full context)
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Elihu urges Job to stop and consider God’s wonderful works. Does Job know, he asks, how God causes lightning to shine, or balances... (full context)
Chapter 38
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Then, God himself addresses Job “out of the whirlwind.” He demands, “Who is this that darkens counsel... (full context)
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
God continues to question Job. Where was Job, he asks, when God laid the earth’s foundations?... (full context)
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
God keeps interrogating Job, asking him if he has walked in the sea’s depths, seen the... (full context)
Chapter 39
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
God continues asking Job if he knows when mountain goats or deer give birth to their... (full context)
Chapter 40
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
The LORD asks Job, “Shall a faultfinder contend with the Almighty?” If Job argues with God, he... (full context)
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
God again speaks to Job out of the whirlwind, telling him to “gird up his loins... (full context)
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
God tells Job to consider Behemoth, which God made just as he made Job. This powerful... (full context)
Chapter 42
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
Job answers the LORD and says he knows that God can do all these things; God’s purpose can’t be... (full context)
The Mystery of God Theme Icon
Human Wisdom vs. Divine Wisdom Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
After the LORD finishes speaking to Job, he addresses Eliphaz the Temanite and says that his wrath is... (full context)
Suffering and Divine Justice Theme Icon
Faith in Suffering Theme Icon
After Job prays for his friends, God restores Job’s fortunes. In fact, God gives Job twice as much as he had before.... (full context)