Braiding Sweetgrass

by

Robin Wall Kimmerer

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The Indigenous Past and Future Theme Analysis

Themes and Colors
Reciprocity and Communalism Theme Icon
Indigenous Wisdom and Scientific Knowledge Theme Icon
Gifts, Gratitude, and Responsibility Theme Icon
Motherhood and Teaching Theme Icon
Animacy and Value Theme Icon
The Indigenous Past and Future Theme Icon
LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Braiding Sweetgrass, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.
The Indigenous Past and Future Theme Icon

Robin Wall Kimmerer is a member of the Potawatomi Nation. Throughout Braiding Sweetgrass, she references the history of Indigenous Americans while also considering what it means to be indigenous at all, and how such ideas can help us build a better future. She doesn’t shy away from the tragic history of Indigenous Americans once European colonizers arrived, but she also emphasizes their resilience and strength despite exploitation and genocide. Braiding Sweetgrass suggests that while Indigenous people have endured incredible hardships, the very idea of being indigenous to the land—that is, seeing it as one’s true home and not a place to be owned, borrowed, or visited—is crucial to saving humanity’s future.

In “The Council of Pecans,” Kimmerer describes her own grandfather, who was taken to Carlisle School and, like thousands of other Indigenous children, stripped of his culture through years of abuse and indoctrination. As an attempted antidote to this cultural genocide many generations later, the Mohawk people in the chapter “Putting Down Roots” attempt to undo the work of places like Carlisle by returning to their traditional homelands, reviving their culture, and physically planting sweetgrass in the places where it once flourished. Kimmerer then looks to the example of Nanabozho, the Anishinaabe Original Man, who worked hard to become indigenous to his new home of Turtle Island (the land that Skywoman created with the help of the animals) by exploring the land and interacting respectfully with all the beings he encountered. Kimmerer believes that this idea of “becoming indigenous to a place” is crucial to restoring modern humanity’s relationship to the land, and that even the descendants of colonizers can look to the example of Nanabozho and Indigenous people like the Mohawk. While she doesn’t believe that colonizers can ever be truly indigenous, she suggests they can become “naturalized,” like a plant that is introduced from elsewhere but doesn’t become invasive. These “naturalized” plants and people, Kimmerer insists, can instead harmoniously blend with the native flora and offer their own unique gifts to the network of reciprocity.

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The Indigenous Past and Future Quotes in Braiding Sweetgrass

Below you will find the important quotes in Braiding Sweetgrass related to the theme of The Indigenous Past and Future.
Chapter 1 Quotes

One story leads to the generous embrace of the living world, the other to banishment. One woman is our ancestral gardener, a cocreator of the good green world that would be the home of her descendants. The other was an exile, just passing through an alien world on a rough road to her real home in heaven.

And then they met—the offspring of Skywoman and the children of Eve—and the land around us bears the scars of that meeting, the echoes of our stories.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker), Skywoman
Page Number: 7
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 3 Quotes

For the greater part of human history, and in places in the world today, common resources were the rule. But some invented a different story, a social construct in which everything is a commodity to be bought and sold. The market economy story has spread like wildfire, with uneven results for human well-being and devastation for the natural world. But it is just a story we have told ourselves and we are free to tell another, to reclaim the old one.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker)
Page Number: 7
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 6 Quotes

The arrogance of English is that the only way to be animate, to be worthy of respect and moral concern, is to be human.

A language teacher I know explained that grammar is just the way we chart relationships in language. Maybe it also reflects our relationships with each other. Maybe a grammar of animacy could lead us to whole new ways of living in the world, other species a sovereign people, a world with a democracy of species, not a tyranny of one—with moral responsibility to water and wolves, and with a legal system that recognizes the standing of other species.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker)
Page Number: 57-58
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 11 Quotes

As I grew to understand the gifts of the earth, I couldn’t understand how “love of country” could omit recognition of the actual country itself. The only promise it requires is to a flag. What of the promises to each other and to the land?

What would it be like to be raised on gratitude, to speak to the natural world as a member of the democracy of species, to raise a pledge of interdependence?

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker)
Page Number: 7
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 13 Quotes

It’s tempting to imagine that these three are deliberate in working together, and perhaps they are. But the beauty of the partnership is that each plant does what it does in order to increase its own growth. But as it happens, when the individuals flourish, so does the whole.

The way of the Three Sisters reminds me of one of the basic teachings of our people. The most important thing each of us can know is our unique gift and how to use it in the world. Individuality is cherished and nurtured, because, in order for the whole to flourish, each of us has to be strong in who we are and carry our gifts with conviction, so they can be shared with others.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker)
Page Number: 134
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 15 Quotes

To me, an experiment is a kind of conversation with plants: I have a question for them, but since we don’t speak the same language, I can’t ask them directly and they won’t answer verbally. But plants can be eloquent in their physical responses and behaviors. Plants answer questions by the way they live, by their responses to change; you just need to learn how to ask. I smile when I hear my colleagues say “I discovered X.” That’s kind of like Columbus claiming to have discovered America. It was here all along, it’s just that he didn’t know it. Experiments are not about discovery but about listening and translating the knowledge of other beings.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker)
Related Symbols: Sweetgrass
Page Number: 7
Explanation and Analysis:

The scientists gave Laurie a warm round of applause. She had spoken their language and made a convincing case for the stimulatory effect of harvesters, indeed for the reciprocity between harvesters and sweetgrass. One even retracted his initial criticism that this research would “add nothing new to science.” The basket makers who sat at the table simply nodded their heads in agreement. Wasn’t this just as the elders have said?

The question was, how do we show respect? Sweetgrass told us the answer as we experimented: sustainable harvesting can be the way we treat a plant with respect, by respectfully receiving its gift.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker), Laurie
Related Symbols: Sweetgrass
Page Number: 165
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 17 Quotes

Cautionary stories of the consequences of taking too much are ubiquitous in Native cultures, but it’s hard to recall a single one in English. Perhaps this helps to explain why we seem to be caught in a trap of overconsumption, which is as destructive to ourselves as to those we consume.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker), Nanabozho
Page Number: 179
Explanation and Analysis:

The state guidelines on hunting and gathering are based exclusively in the biophysical realm, while the rules of the Honorable Harvest are based on accountability to both the physical and the metaphysical world. The taking of another life to support your own is far more significant when you recognize the beings who are harvested as persons, nonhuman persons vested with awareness, intelligence, spirit—and who have families waiting for them at home. Killing a who demands something different than killing an it.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker)
Page Number: 183
Explanation and Analysis:

We need the Honorable Harvest today. But like the leeks and the marten, it is an endangered species that arose in another landscape, another time, from a legacy of traditional knowledge. That ethic of reciprocity was cleared away along with the forests, the beauty of justice traded away for more stuff. We’ve created a cultural and economic landscape that is hospitable to the growth of neither leeks nor honor. If the earth is nothing more than inanimate matter, if lives are nothing more than commodities, then the way of the Honorable Harvest, too, is dead. But when you stand in the stirring spring woods, you know otherwise.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker)
Page Number: 200-201
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 18 Quotes

Had the new people learned what Original Man was taught at a council of animals—never damage Creation, and never interfere with the sacred purpose of another being—the eagle would look down on a different world. The salmon would be crowding up the rivers, and passenger pigeons would darken the sky. […] I would be speaking Potawatomi. We would see what Nanabozho saw. It does not bear too much imagining, for in that direction lies heartbreak.

Against the backdrop of that history, an invitation to settler society to become Indigenous to place feels like a free ticket to a housebreaking party. It could be read as an open invitation to take what little is left. Can settlers be trusted to follow Nanabozho, to walk so that “each step is a greeting to Mother Earth”?

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker), Nanabozho
Page Number: 211
Explanation and Analysis:

Maybe the task assigned to Second Man is to unlearn the model of kudzu and follow the teachings of White Man’s Footstep, to strive to become naturalized to place, to throw off the mind-set of the immigrant. Being naturalized to place means to live as if this is the land that feeds you, as if these are the streams from which you drink, that build your body and fill your spirit. […] Here you will give your gifts and meet your responsibilities. To become naturalized is to live as if your children’s future matters, to take care of the land as if our lives and the lives of all our relatives depend on it. Because they do.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker), Nanabozho
Page Number: 214-215
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 21 Quotes

The First Salmon ceremonies […] were for the Salmon themselves, and for all the glittering realms of Creation, for the renewal of the world. People understood that when lives are given on their behalf they have received something precious. Ceremonies are a way to give something precious in return.

When the season turns and the grasses dry on the headland, preparations begin; […] With waders and boats, the biologists are on the river to dip nets into the restored channels of the estuary, to take its pulse. […] And still the salmon do not come. So the waiting scientists roll out their sleeping bags and turn off the lab equipment. All but one. A single microscope light is left on.

Out beyond the surf they gather, tasting the waters of home. They see it against the dark of the headland. Someone has left a light on, blazing a tiny beacon into the night, calling the salmon back home.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker)
Page Number: 7
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 26 Quotes

Cautionary Windigo tales arose in a commons-based society where sharing was essential to survival and greed made any individual a danger to the whole. In the old times, individuals who endangered the community by taking too much for themselves were first counseled, then ostracized, and if the greed continued, they were eventually banished. The Windigo myth may have arisen from the remembrance of the banished, doomed to wander hungry and alone, wreaking vengeance on the ones who spurned them. It is a terrible punishment to be banished from the web of reciprocity, with no one to share with you and no one for you to care for.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Windigo
Page Number: 307
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 31 Quotes

Each of us comes from people who were once Indigenous. We can reclaim our membership in the cultures of gratitude that formed our old relationships with the living earth. Gratitude is a powerful antidote to Windigo psychosis. A deep awareness of the gifts of the earth and of each other is medicine. The practice of gratitude lets us hear the badgering of marketers as the stomach grumblings of a Windigo. It celebrates cultures of regenerative reciprocity, where wealth is understood to be having enough to share and riches are counted in mutually beneficial relationships. Besides, it makes us happy.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Windigo
Page Number: 377
Explanation and Analysis:
Epilogue Quotes

The moral covenant of reciprocity calls us to honor our responsibilities for all we have been given, for all that we have taken. It’s our turn now, long overdue. Let us hold a giveaway for Mother Earth, spread our blankets out for her and pile them high with gifts of our own making. Imagine the books, the paintings, the poems, the clever machines, the compassionate acts, the transcendent ideas, the perfect tools. The fierce defense of all that has been given. Gifts of mind, hands, heart, voice, and vision all offered up on behalf of the earth. Whatever our gift, we are called to give it and to dance for the renewal of the world.

In return for the privilege of breath.

Related Characters: Robin Wall Kimmerer (speaker)
Page Number: 384
Explanation and Analysis: