Brick Lane

by

Monica Ali

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Hamid Character Analysis

Nazneen and Hasina’s father and Rupban’s terminally unfaithful husband, Hamid is an overseer in the paddy field, and the second richest man in Gouripur. Furious when Hasina decides to elope with Malek, he keeps watch outside the village for sixteen days, hoping his daughter will return so he can chop her head off. She never does return, and Hamid, who would have preferred sons, arranges a marriage for Nazneen to Chanu despite the fact that Chanu, a failed academic, is roughly twenty years Nazneen’s senior.

Hamid Quotes in Brick Lane

The Brick Lane quotes below are all either spoken by Hamid or refer to Hamid. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Displacement and Dissociation Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Scribner edition of Brick Lane published in 2003.
Chapter 1 Quotes

“A girl,” said Rupban.

“I know. Never mind,” said Hamid. “What can you do?” And he went away again.

Related Characters: Rupban (speaker), Hamid (speaker), Nazneen
Page Number: 4
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Brick Lane LitChart as a printable PDF.
Brick Lane PDF

Hamid Character Timeline in Brick Lane

The timeline below shows where the character Hamid appears in Brick Lane. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2
Displacement and Dissociation Theme Icon
Cultural and Religious Sexism Theme Icon
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
...a spear in a store back in Gouripur. The spear pierced her through the heart. Hamid soon brought home a new wife, but the woman only stayed a month. Mumtaz rarely... (full context)
Chapter 3
Cultural and Religious Sexism Theme Icon
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
...laid on the ground, missing flesh and one arm. Rupban spends the day crying and Hamid, having declared her a saint, leaves the village and is gone for three days. Nazneen... (full context)
Chapter 6
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
Assimilation and Immigrant Life Theme Icon
...left to fate, and childbirth is nothing like indigestion. Nazneen now thinks she understands why Hamid would leave for days on end. He needed to be spared Rupban’s misguided saintliness. (full context)
Chapter 7
Cultural and Religious Sexism Theme Icon
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
...sister does. She wonders why, in Nazneen’s dreams, Rupban is angry. Hasina then writes that Hamid was often unfaithful to Rupban. He even wanted to take another wife, but Rupban threatened... (full context)
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
Hasina listens to the jute cutters’ tall tales, remembering a time when Hamid took her and Nazneen to watch the men dive for the fibrous plant. Hussain often... (full context)
Cultural and Religious Sexism Theme Icon
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
...often of Rupban and Mumtaz and life in Gouripur. She thinks of the second wife Hamid brought home and how quickly she left. That is the way with men, Hasina writes. (full context)
Chapter 11
Cultural and Religious Sexism Theme Icon
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
Assimilation and Immigrant Life Theme Icon
...Mrs. Islam. Razia does some of Nazneen’s sewing and Nazneen thinks about Hasina and about Hamid’s second wife who came and went without a trace. What happens to such women? She... (full context)
Chapter 17
Cultural and Religious Sexism Theme Icon
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
...possessed by an evil jinni. The jinni made her sharpen sticks and try to poke Hamid’s eyes out with them. It made her stop washing. Things got so bad that Hamid... (full context)
Chapter 1
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
...in the same way it later proceeds: in uncertainty. Rupban’s sharp screams alarm her husband, Hamid, who grabs a club on his way home from the latrine, convinced a man is... (full context)
Cultural and Religious Sexism Theme Icon
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
Hamid returns to inspect his child, who lies sleeping on the bedroll. Rupban gives him the... (full context)
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
...accepts Rupban’s wisdom and life philosophy, which insists on trusting completely in God’s will. Rupban, Hamid tells his daughter, is a saint. She comes from a family of them. When Mumtaz... (full context)
Cultural and Religious Sexism Theme Icon
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
Hasina, Rubpan and Hamid’s second child, is born three days after Banesa’s death. She is beautiful and stubborn. She... (full context)
Cultural and Religious Sexism Theme Icon
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
...agrees to an arranged marriage with Chanu, a much older man who lives in London. Hamid offers to show Nazneen a picture of her intended bridegroom, but she says doesn’t need... (full context)
Displacement and Dissociation Theme Icon
Luck, Class, and Fate Theme Icon
Assimilation and Immigrant Life Theme Icon
Nazneen likewise takes a great deal of satisfaction in her apartment’s fine furnishings. Even though Hamid was the second wealthiest man in their village back home in Pakistan, he never had... (full context)
Displacement and Dissociation Theme Icon
Cultural and Religious Sexism Theme Icon
Assimilation and Immigrant Life Theme Icon
...misses people, and the give-and-take of real human connection. Her thoughts drift. She wonders why Hamid did not see her and Chanu off at the airport, and if Chanu will want... (full context)