Bridge to Terabithia

by

Katherine Paterson

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Bridge to Terabithia can help.

Miss Edmunds Character Analysis

The music teacher at Lark Creek Elementary. Jess is “in love” with the beautiful, smart, talented, and empathetic Miss Edmunds, a self-described “liberated woman” who wears blue jeans and keeps her hair long and wild. Miss Edmunds is the only person—other than Leslie—to compliment Jess’s artistic talent and support him in his drawing, often encouraging him to bring her each new piece of art he makes. She even takes Jess to Washington, D.C. one afternoon to visit the National Gallery—it is Jess’s first trip to an art museum, and he decides to keep the experience to himself rather than invite Leslie along. The trip ends up being a fateful one, as Leslie, left behind in Lark Creek for the day, visits Terabithia alone—and falls to her death on the way over the creek. Miss Edmunds is kind, generous, and emotional, and helps nurture the parts of Jess that even his own family tries to ignore or suppress.

Miss Edmunds Quotes in Bridge to Terabithia

The Bridge to Terabithia quotes below are all either spoken by Miss Edmunds or refer to Miss Edmunds. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Friendship, Grief, and Loss Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the HarperCollins edition of Bridge to Terabithia published in 2017.
Chapter 10 Quotes

Entering the gallery was like stepping inside the pine grove [in Terabithia]—the huge vaulted marble, the cool splash of the fountain, and the green growing all around. Two little children had pulled away from their mothers and were running about, screaming to each other. It was all Jess could do not to grab them and tell them how to behave in so obviously a sacred place.

Related Characters: Jess Aarons, Miss Edmunds
Page Number: 127
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Bridge to Terabithia LitChart as a printable PDF.
Bridge to Terabithia PDF

Miss Edmunds Character Timeline in Bridge to Terabithia

The timeline below shows where the character Miss Edmunds appears in Bridge to Terabithia. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2
Individuality vs. Conformity Theme Icon
Fantasy and Escapism Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
...man. The only person in the world Jess feels comfortable showing his art to is Miss Edmunds , the music teacher at Lark Creek Elementary—a beautiful, young, talented woman with whom Jess... (full context)
Chapter 4
Individuality vs. Conformity Theme Icon
Fantasy and Escapism Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
...the boys. On Friday, the week’s lone bright spot finally arrives in the form of Miss Edmunds ’s music class. She greets Jess warmly as he walks into the room and asks... (full context)
Friendship, Grief, and Loss Theme Icon
Individuality vs. Conformity Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
As the class gathers and Miss Edmunds begins strumming her guitar, entreating the class to sing along, Jess meets Leslie’s eyes across... (full context)
Chapter 10
Friendship, Grief, and Loss Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
...never gets phone calls, but he rushes over and takes the call all the same. Miss Edmunds is on the other end—she tells Jess that she’s planning on driving down to Washington... (full context)
Friendship, Grief, and Loss Theme Icon
Gender Roles Theme Icon
Jess doesn’t think about inviting Leslie along until Miss Edmunds has already driven them beyond the bounds of town. Jess secretly admits to himself that... (full context)
Fantasy and Escapism Theme Icon
Entering the National Gallery feels like entering the pine grove in Terabithia—sacred and awe-inspiring. Miss Edmunds explains certain paintings to Jess, and he is torn between which is more beautiful—the art,... (full context)
Friendship, Grief, and Loss Theme Icon
After Miss Edmunds drops Jess at home he goes inside, feeling as if he’s “jiggling” with joy—but as... (full context)