Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

Cheyenne chief who led a failed resistance to U.S. expansion in the mid-1860s. Roman Nose was, in many ways, a good example of the kind of Native American chief who became increasingly common in the late 19th century: he was wily, aggressive, and almost as frightening to his own followers as he was to his enemies. Roman Nose led raids on white settlements on Cheyenne land, and at one point he contemplated murdering U.S. government negotiators, choosing not to only because he knew doing so would effectively wipe out the Cheyenne tribe. Although Roman Nose participated in peace talks with the U.S., he later led a group of soldiers against the U.S. military, and was shot in the ensuing battle.
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Roman Nose Character Timeline in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

The timeline below shows where the character Roman Nose appears in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 5: Powder River Invasion
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In September 1865, the Cheyenne chief Roman Nose felt he was ready to lead an attack on the U.S. He joined with Sitting... (full context)
Chapter 7: “The Only Good Indian Is a Dead Indian”
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In the autumn of 1866, Roman Nose led a group of soldiers, including Charlie Bent, to Fort Wallace, while another chief, Black... (full context)
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Later in the winter, Roman Nose agreed to send representatives to meet with General Winfield Scott Hancock, though Hancock was angry... (full context)
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...with the Native Americans, General Hancock marched his men out to the Cheyennes’ settlement. Worried, Roman Nose led his soldiers to defend the village. He boasted that he would “ride out alone... (full context)
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The U.S. soldiers (one of whom was General George Armstrong Custer) approached Roman Nose ’s men. Roman Nose waved a truce flag, and rode toward General Hancock. Arrogantly, Hancock... (full context)
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When General Hancock realized that Roman Nose had no intention of bringing his people to the U.S. army, he became angry. He... (full context)
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On September 27, Roman Nose arrived at Medicine Lodge Creek for peace arrangements. After October 16, Black Kettle, as well... (full context)
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...After the chiefs signed, the U.S. commissioners offered the chiefs guns and other gifts. However, Roman Nose never signed the treaty. (full context)
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...General Sheridan to find and destroy Native American camps. The hunters rushed to meet with Roman Nose . Roman Nose ordered for Cheyenne and Sioux warriors to prepare for battle. The next... (full context)
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...fight the Battle of Beecher’s Island. They boasted about killing “hundreds of redskins,” and celebrated Roman Nose ’s death. The battle broke the Cheyennes’ resistance, and many of them migrated south. Meanwhile,... (full context)