Captain Corelli’s Mandolin

Captain Corelli’s Mandolin

Prime Minister Metaxas Character Analysis

Metaxas is the Prime Minister of Greece at the start of the novel; he dies of a chronic illness in January of 1941. He's a small and regretful man who feels trapped by his choice to lead Greece. He spends most of his time worrying about Mussolini and his daughter, Lulu, who contradicts him publically and is uncontrollable. When Grazzi delivers Mussolini's ultimatum to Metaxas, Metaxas very calmly refuses to give in. Grazzi declares that this is Metaxas's finest moment, and insists that Metaxas is the most honest leader he's ever met. After the start of the war with Italy, Metaxas's choice to refuse the Italian occupation earns him the love and respect of Greeks who never before thought they'd support him--Dr. Iannis even puts a picture of Metaxas on his wall, despite believing his past policies to be silly.
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Prime Minister Metaxas Character Timeline in Captain Corelli’s Mandolin

The timeline below shows where the character Prime Minister Metaxas appears in Captain Corelli’s Mandolin. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2. The Duce
War: Horror, Beauty, and Humanity Theme Icon
Power, Reality, and Absurdity Theme Icon
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...it's important to pretend that there are indeed British bases in Greece, as it makes Metaxas, the prime minister of Greece, nervous. (full context)
Chapter 5. The Man who Said 'No'
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Family, Opportunity, and Gender Dynamics Theme Icon
Metaxas slumps in his chair and wonders what he's going to do about Mussolini and his... (full context)
Power, Reality, and Absurdity Theme Icon
Metaxas feels momentarily like a prisoner in his own country. He wishes he'd retired early so... (full context)
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The narrator notes that Metaxas is too caught up in romanticizing his role. Metaxas thinks of himself as a doctor,... (full context)
Chapter 14. Grazzi
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Grazzi says the interview with Metaxas was the most painful occasion of his life. Metaxas greeted him in his nightgown and... (full context)
Chapter 16. Letters to Mandras at the Front
Family, Opportunity, and Gender Dynamics Theme Icon
...continues that Dr. Iannis, Stamatis, and Kokolios have banded together to praise the military and Metaxas despite their differing political views. Italian residents have been beaten. She says she's decided to... (full context)
Family, Opportunity, and Gender Dynamics Theme Icon
...her bedcover. News from the front says that the Greeks are taking down Mussolini, but Metaxas apparently isn't well. She again asks him to write to Drosoula. (full context)
Power, Reality, and Absurdity Theme Icon
Family, Opportunity, and Gender Dynamics Theme Icon
...Mandras. She's glad that she hasn't seen his name on the list of the dead. Metaxas is dead and Dr. Iannis cut off his moustache so he doesn't look anything like... (full context)