Charlotte’s Web

by

E. B. White

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Charlotte’s Web: Chapter 2 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Over the next few weeks, Fern dotes on Wilbur and shows him love, devotion, and attention. She feeds him before she eats at each meal, and as the days get warmer and Wilbur moves from his carton in the kitchen to a large wooden box full of straw outside, she spends hours sitting with him, “enchanted” by his every move. She sees the pig as her “baby,” and often even puts him in her little toy carriage and pushes him around with her dolls.
Fern continues to love, care for, and even anthropomorphize Wilbur, treating him like a human and giving him the attention and dignity often only reserved for human animals.
Themes
Friendship and Sacrifice Theme Icon
The Natural World  Theme Icon
Related Quotes
The happy days roll past quickly, and soon Wilbur is five weeks old. Summer is coming, and Wilbur has grown large. Mr. Arable has begun to feel that Wilbur is becoming a burden to feed and house, and Mrs. Arable suggests Fern sell Wilbur to their neighbors and relatives, the Zuckermans—Fern’s Uncle Homer often raises pigs. Fern agrees to the arrangement, and sells Wilbur to Homer and Edith Zuckerman for six dollars. Fern vows to visit Wilbur at his new home as often as she can.  
Nature always runs its course, and soon Fern is reminded that as much as she’d like her little pig to be a real baby, it is, at the end of the day, an animal. Fern promises to continue caring for Wilbur just as intensely and to not let distance come between them.
Themes
Friendship and Sacrifice Theme Icon
The Natural World  Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon