Charlotte’s Web

by

E. B. White

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Wilbur Character Analysis

Wilbur the pig is the novel’s central protagonist. The runt of his spring litter, Wilbur is rescued from slaughter when Fern Arable insists that her father let him live. Fern raises Wilbur as if he’s a human baby, feeding him from bottles and taking him for carriage rides alongside her dolls and toys. Wilbur is saved from a grisly fate and given a plush life full of love and plenty—but when he begins to grow too large for life in the Arable home, he is moved to the Arables’ relatives’ farm, and must adjust to life among other animals rather than humans. Wilbur is sensitive, emotional, and dramatic, and as he struggles to make friends with the other barnyard animals, he is often given to loneliness and self-pity. When Wilbur makes friends with Charlotte the spider, an unlikely ally, he finds himself learning profound lessons about life and death, friendship and sacrifice, and the debt individuals (whether human or animal) owe to one another. Like Fern, Charlotte saves Wilbur from certain death by making a plea for his worth to his human owners, this time by broadcasting complimentary adjectives like “terrific” and “humble” to the Zuckermans using intricately woven webs. Through his friendship with Charlotte, Wilbur comes to see that true friendship is rooted in unconditional love and self-sacrifice, and also learns about the inevitability of death. Though his own life is spared (and even celebrated with a special prize at the county fair), Charlotte’s short life span ends just as summer does, and Wilbur must return to the farm from the county fair by himself—and carry on Charlotte’s legacy of fearlessness, kindness, and bravery even in the face of loneliness and despair.

Wilbur Quotes in Charlotte’s Web

The Charlotte’s Web quotes below are all either spoken by Wilbur or refer to Wilbur. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Friendship and Sacrifice Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the HarperCollins edition of Charlotte’s Web published in 1952.
Chapter 1 Quotes

“Fern,” said Mr. Arable, “I know more about raising a litter of pigs than you do. A weakling makes trouble. Now run along!”

“But it’s unfair,” cried Fern. “The pig couldn’t help being born small, could it? If I had been very small at birth, would you have killed me?”

Mr. Arable smiled. “Certainly not,” he said, looking down at his daughter with love. “But this is different. A little girl is one thing, a little runty pig is another.”

“I see no difference,” replied Fern, still hanging on to the ax. “This is the most terrible case of injustice I ever heard of.”

A queer look came over John Arable’s face. He seemed almost ready to cry himself.

“All right,” he said. “You go back to the house and 1will bring the runt when I come in. I’ll let you start it on a bottle, like a baby. Then you’ll see what trouble a pig can be.”

Related Characters: Fern Arable (speaker), Mr. Arable (speaker), Wilbur
Page Number: 3
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 2 Quotes

Every morning after breakfast, Wilbur walked out to the road with Fern and waited with her till the bus came. She would wave good-bye to him, and he would stand and watch the bus until it vanished around a turn. While Fern was in school, Wilbur was shut up inside his yard. But as soon as she got home in the afternoon, she would take him out and he would follow her around the place. If she went into the house, Wilbur went, too. If she went upstairs, Wilbur would wait at the bottom step until she came down again. If she took her doll for a walk in the doll carriage, Wilbur followed along. Sometimes, on these journeys, Wilbur would get tired, and Fern would pick him up and put him in the carriage alongside the doll. He liked this. And if he was very tired, he would close his eyes and go to sleep under the doll’s blanket. He looked cute when his eyes were closed, because his lashes were so long. The doll would close her eyes, too, and Fern would wheel the carriage very slowly and smoothly so as not to wake her infants.

Related Characters: Wilbur, Fern Arable
Page Number: 10
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

“You mean you eat flies?” gasped Wilbur.

“Certainly. […] I have to live, don’t I? […] Of course, I don’t really eat them. I drink them—drink their blood. I love blood,” said Charlotte, and her pleasant, thin voice grew even thinner and more pleasant.

“Don’t say that!” groaned Wilbur. “Please don’t say things like that!”

“Why not? It’s true, and I have to say what is true. I am not entirely happy about my diet of flies and bugs, but it’s the way I’m made. A spider has to pick up a living somehow or other, and I happen to be a trapper. I just naturally build a web and trap flies and other in sects. My mother was a trapper before me. Her mother was a trapper before her. All our family have been trappers. Way back for thousands and thousands of years we spiders have been laying for flies and bugs.”

“It’s a miserable inheritance,” said Wilbur, gloomily. He was sad because his new friend was so bloodthirsty.

[…]

“Well, you can’t talk,” said Charlotte. “You have your meals brought to you in a pail. Nobody feeds me. I have to get my own living. I live by my wits. I have to be sharp and clever, lest I go hungry. I have to think things out, catch what I can, take what comes. And it just so happens, my friend, that what comes is flies and insects and bugs. And furthermore,” said Charlotte, shaking one of her legs, “do you realize that if I didn’t catch bugs and eat them, bugs would increase and multiply and get so numerous that they’d destroy the earth, wipe out everything?”

“Really?” said Wilbur. “I wouldn’t want that to happen. Perhaps your web is a good thing after all.”

Related Characters: Wilbur (speaker), Charlotte (speaker)
Related Symbols: Charlotte’s Web
Page Number: 39-40
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

One afternoon, when Fern was sitting on her stool, the oldest sheep walked into the barn, and stopped to pay a call on Wilbur.

“Hello!” she said. “Seems to me you’re putting on weight.”

“Yes, I guess I am,” replied Wilbur. “At my age it’s a good idea to keep gaining.”

“Just the same, I don’t envy you,” said the old sheep. “You know why they’re fattening you up, don’t you?”

“No,” said Wilbur.

“Well, I don’t like to spread bad news,” said the sheep, “but they’re fattening you up because they’re going to kill you, that’s why.”

“They’re going to what?” screamed Wilbur. Fern grew rigid on her stool.

“Kill you. Turn you into smoked bacon and ham,” continued the old sheep.

Related Characters: Wilbur (speaker), The Old Sheep (speaker), Fern Arable, Homer Zuckerman, Aunt Edith Zuckerman, Lurvy
Page Number: 49
Explanation and Analysis:

Wilbur burst into tears. “I don’t want to die,” he moaned. “I want to stay alive, right here in my comfortable manure pile with all my friends. I want to breathe the beautiful air and lie in the beautiful sun.”

“You’re certainly making a beautiful noise,” snapped the old sheep.

“I don’t want to die!” screamed Wilbur, throwing himself to the ground.

“You shall not die,” said Charlotte, briskly.

“What? Really?” cried Wilbur. “Who’s going to save me?”

“I am,” said Charlotte.

“How?” asked Wilbur.

“That remains to be seen. But I am going to save you, and I want you to quiet down immediately. You’re carrying on in a childish way. Stop your crying! I can’t stand hysterics.”

Related Characters: Wilbur (speaker), Charlotte (speaker), The Old Sheep (speaker)
Page Number: 51
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 10 Quotes

“Hey, look at that big spider!” [Avery] said. “It’s tremenjus.”

“Leave it alone!” commanded Fern. “You’ve got a frog—isn’t that enough?”

“That’s a fine spider and I’m going to capture it,” said Avery. He took the cover off the candy box. Then he picked up a stick. “I’m going to knock that ol’ spider into this box,” he said.

Wilbur’s heart almost stopped when he saw what was going on. This might be the end of Charlotte if the boy succeeded in catching her.

“You stop it, Avery!” cried Fern.

Avery put one leg over the fence of the pigpen. He was just about to raise his stick to hit Charlotte when he lost his balance. He swayed and toppled and landed on the edge of Wilbur’s trough. The trough tipped up and then came down with a slap. The goose egg was right underneath. There was a dull explosion as the egg broke, and then a horrible smell.

Related Characters: Fern Arable (speaker), Avery Arable (speaker), Wilbur, Charlotte
Related Symbols: Charlotte’s Web
Page Number: 71-72
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 11 Quotes

There, in the center of the web, neatly woven in block letters, was a message. It said: SOME PIG!

Lurvy felt weak. He brushed his hand across his eyes and stared harder at Charlotte’s web. “I’m seeing things,” he whispered. He dropped to his knees and uttered a short prayer. Then, forgetting all about Wilbur’s breakfast, he walked back to the house and called Mr. Zuckerman.

“I think you’d better come down to the pigpen,” he said.

[…]

Zuckerman stared at the writing on the web. Then he murmured the words “Some Pig.” Then he looked at Lurvy. Then they both began to tremble. Charlotte, sleepy after her night’s exertions, smiled as she watched.

Wilbur came and stood directly under the web.

“Some pig!” muttered Lurvy in a low voice.

“Some pig!” whispered Mr. Zuckerman.

Related Characters: Homer Zuckerman (speaker), Lurvy (speaker), Wilbur, Charlotte
Related Symbols: Charlotte’s Web
Page Number: 77-79
Explanation and Analysis:

On Sunday the church was full. The minister explained the miracle. He said that the words on the spider’s web proved that human beings must always be on the watch for the coming of wonders.

All in all, the Zuckermans’ pigpen was the center of attraction. Fern was happy, for she felt that Charlotte’s trick was working and that Wilbur’s life would be saved. But she found that the barn was not nearly as pleasant—too many people. She liked it better when she could be all alone with her friends the animals.

Related Characters: Wilbur, Charlotte , Fern Arable
Related Symbols: Charlotte’s Web
Page Number: 84-85
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 13 Quotes

“Run around!” commanded Charlotte. “I want to see you in action, to see if you are radiant.”

Wilbur raced to the end of his yard.

“Now back again, faster!” said Charlotte.

Wilbur galloped back. His skin shone. His tail had a fine, tight curl in it.

“Jump into the air!” cried Charlotte.

Wilbur jumped as high as he could.

“Keep your knees straight and touch the ground with your ears!” called Charlotte.

Wilbur obeyed.

“Do a back flip with a half twist in it!” cried Charlotte.

Wilbur went over backwards, writhing and twisting.

“O.K., Wilbur,” said Charlotte. “You can go back to sleep. O.K., Templeton, the soap ad will do, I guess. I’m not sure Wilbur’s action is exactly radiant, but it’s interesting.”

“Actually,” said Wilbur, “I feel radiant.”

“Do you?” said Charlotte, looking at him with affection. “Well, you’re a good little pig, and radiant you shall be.”

Related Characters: Wilbur (speaker), Charlotte (speaker), Templeton
Related Symbols: Charlotte’s Web
Page Number: 100-101
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 18 Quotes

“What are you doing up there, Charlotte?”

“Oh, making something,” she said. “Making something, as usual.”

“Is it something for me?” asked Wilbur.

“No,” said Charlotte. “It’s something for me, for a change.”

“Please tell me what it is,” begged Wilbur.

“I’ll tell you in the morning,” she said. “When the first light comes into the sky and the sparrows stir and the cows rattle their chains, when the rooster crows and the stars fade, when early cars whisper along the highway, you look up here and I’ll show you something. I will show you my masterpiece.”

Related Characters: Wilbur (speaker), Charlotte (speaker)
Related Symbols: Charlotte’s Web
Page Number: 143
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 19 Quotes

The Zuckermans and the Arables stared at the tag. Mrs. Zuckerman began to cry. Nobody said a word. They just stared at the tag. Then they stared at Uncle. Then they stared at the tag again. Lurvy took out an enormous handkerchief and blew his nose very loud— so loud, in fact, that the noise was heard by stableboys over at the horse barn.

“Can I have some money?” asked Fern. “I want to go out on the midway.”

“You stay right where you are!” said her mother. Tears came to Fern’s eyes.

“What’s everybody crying about?” asked Mr. Zuckerman. “Let’s get busy! Edith, bring the buttermilk!”

Mrs. Zuckerman wiped her eyes with her handkerchief. She went to the truck and came back with a gallon jar of buttermilk.

“Bath time!” said Zuckerman, cheerfully.

Related Characters: Fern Arable (speaker), Homer Zuckerman (speaker), Mrs. Arable (speaker), Wilbur, Aunt Edith Zuckerman, Mr. Arable, Lurvy, Uncle
Page Number: 150
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 20 Quotes

“Ladeez and gentlemen,” said the loud speaker, “we now present Mr. Homer L. Zuckerman’s distinguished pig. The fame of this unique animal has spread to the far corners of the earth, attracting many valuable tourists to our great State.”

[…]

“This magnificent animal,” continued the loud speaker, “is truly terrific. Look at him, ladies and gentlemen! Note the smoothness and whiteness of the coat, observe the spotless skin, the healthy pink glow of ears and snout.”

[…]

“Ladeez and gentlemen,” continued the loud speaker, “I must not take any more of your valuable time. On behalf of the governors of the Fair, I have the honor of awarding a special prize of twenty-five dollars to Mr. Zuckerman, together with a handsome bronze medal suitably engraved, in token of our appreciation of the part played by this pig—this radiant, this terrific, this humble pig—in attracting so many visitors to our great County Fair.”

Related Characters: Wilbur, Homer Zuckerman
Related Symbols: Charlotte’s Web
Page Number: 157-158
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 21 Quotes

“Why did you do all this for me?” [Wilbur] asked. “I don’t deserve it. I’ve never done anything for you.”

“You have been my friend,” replied Charlotte. “That in itself is a tremendous thing. I wove my webs for you because I liked you. After all, what’s a life, anyway? We’re born, we live a little while, we die. A spider’s life can’t help being something of a mess, with all this trapping and eating flies. By helping you, perhaps I was trying to lift up my life a trifle. Heaven knows anyone’s life can stand a little of that.”

Related Characters: Wilbur (speaker), Charlotte (speaker)
Related Symbols: Charlotte’s Web
Page Number: 164
Explanation and Analysis:

He carefully took the little bundle in his mouth and held it there on top of his tongue. He remembered what Charlotte had told him—that the sac was waterproof and strong. It felt funny on his tongue and made him drool a bit. And of course he couldn’t say anything. But as he was being shoved into the crate, he looked up at Charlotte and gave her a wink. She knew he was saying good-bye in the only way he could. And she knew her children were safe.

“Good-bye!” she whispered. Then she summoned all her strength and waved one of her front legs at him. She never moved again. Next day, as the Ferris wheel was being taken apart and the race horses were being loaded into vans and the entertainers were packing up their belongings and driving away in their trailers, Charlotte died. The Fair Grounds were soon deserted. The sheds and buildings were empty and forlorn. The infield was littered with bottles and trash. Nobody, of the hundreds of people that had visited the Fair, knew that a grey spider had played the most important part of all. No one was with her when she died.

Related Characters: Wilbur, Charlotte
Page Number: 170-171
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 22 Quotes

As time went on, and the months and years came and went, [Wilbur] was never without friends. Fern did not come regularly to the barn any more. She was growing up, and was careful to avoid childish things, like sitting on a milk stool near a pigpen. But Charlotte’s children and grandchildren and great grandchildren, year after year, lived in the doorway. Each spring there were new little spiders hatching out to take the place of the old. Most of them sailed away, on their balloons. But always two or three stayed and set up housekeeping in the doorway.

Mr. Zuckerman took fine care of Wilbur all the rest of his days, and the pig was often visited by friends and admirers, for nobody ever forgot the year of his triumph and the miracle of the web. Life in the barn was very good—night and day, winter and summer, spring and fall, dull days and bright days. It was the best place to be, thought Wilbur, this warm delicious cellar, with the garrulous geese, the changing seasons, the heat of the sun, the passage of swallows, the nearness of rats, the sameness of sheep, the love of spiders, the smell of manure, and the glory of everything. Wilbur never forgot Charlotte. Although he loved her children and grandchildren dearly, none of the new spiders ever quite took her place in his heart. She was in a class by herself. It is not often that someone comes along who is a true friend and a good writer. Charlotte was both.

Page Number: 183-184
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Charlotte’s Web LitChart as a printable PDF.
Charlotte’s Web PDF

Wilbur Character Timeline in Charlotte’s Web

The timeline below shows where the character Wilbur appears in Charlotte’s Web. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: Before Breakfast
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...pig that she hardly notices anyone or anything else. She decides to name the pig Wilbur—“the most beautiful name she [can] think of”—and daydreams about what life with him will be... (full context)
Chapter 2: Wilbur
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Over the next few weeks, Fern dotes on Wilbur and shows him love, devotion, and attention. She feeds him before she eats at each... (full context)
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The happy days roll past quickly, and soon Wilbur is five weeks old. Summer is coming, and Wilbur has grown large. Mr. Arable has... (full context)
Chapter 3: Escape
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Wilbur’s new home in the Zuckermans’ barn is sweet-smelling and roomy. Wilbur lives in the lower... (full context)
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...in June, Fern does not arrive on time for her visit. The bored and confused Wilbur walks out to the small yard outside the barn, complaining about how there’s “never anything... (full context)
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Soon, Edith notices that Wilbur has gotten out and calls for Lurvy, the hired man, to go and catch Wilbur.... (full context)
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As Wilbur eats his snack, Lurvy and Edith repair the loose board in the pen and comment... (full context)
Chapter 4: Loneliness
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The next day is dark, rainy, and gloomy, and Wilbur’s whole routine for the day—breakfast, talking with Templeton the rat, napping outdoors in the sun,... (full context)
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Wilbur asks the goose to play with him, but she insists she needs to sit on... (full context)
Chapter 5: Charlotte
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The night is long and passes fitfully. Wilbur keeps waking up at every tiny sound, anticipating the morning and the chance to greet... (full context)
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After eating, Wilbur settles back down for a morning nap—just then, the mysterious voice greets him once again... (full context)
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Charlotte begins wrapping up a fly that’s gotten caught in her web, and explains to Wilbur, step by step, the process through which she catches and consumes her prey. As Charlotte... (full context)
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...goose overhears this conversation and thinks to herself what an innocent and naïve little pig Wilbur is. He doesn’t even know, the goose thinks to herself, that “Mr. Zuckerman and Lurvy... (full context)
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As Charlotte eats the fly, Wilbur lies down and closes his eyes. He thinks about how though he has at last... (full context)
Chapter 6: Summer Days
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...Fern visits the barn almost every day to sit quietly on her stool and watch Wilbur—all the animals at the Zuckermans’ treat her “as an equal.” Fern and Avery often help... (full context)
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...take good care of the egg, and as he stores it in his hidey-hole beneath Wilbur’s trough, the other barn animals coo and fuss over the baby goslings. (full context)
Chapter 7: Bad News
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Wilbur and Charlotte grow closer each day. He even learns to appreciate her diet, as it... (full context)
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Charlotte urges Wilbur to be quiet. Wilbur asks Charlotte if what the old sheep has said is true.... (full context)
Chapter 9: Wilbur’s Boast
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...Charlotte weaves and re-weaves her webs each time one of her prey disturbs its threads. Wilbur admires Charlotte’s hard work and special talents, and begins wishing that he could spin a... (full context)
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...“bear” leaving her friends. As the pleasant sounds and smells of dusk fill the bar, Wilbur remembers the old sheep’s warning, and whispers to Charlotte that he doesn’t want to die—he... (full context)
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Wilbur asks if he can do anything to help with the plan, and Charlotte encourages Wilbur... (full context)
Chapter 10: An Explosion
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...in her web deep in thought, trying to come up with a way to save Wilbur. Charlotte is “naturally patient,” and never stresses or worries. Very early one morning, in the... (full context)
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...eating berries, and then Fern heads back up to the barn to spend time with Wilbur. Avery joins her, and when he sees Charlotte hanging from the barn door, he becomes... (full context)
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Just as Avery is about to catch Charlotte, Wilbur’s trough tips over—crushing Templeton’s goose egg and releasing a horrible stink into the air. Avery... (full context)
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Wilbur laps up all of his food, and by the time he is finished, the stench... (full context)
Chapter 11: The Miracle
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...each strand shines with beads of water. When Lurvy comes out to the barn with Wilbur’s breakfast he stops short at the sight of it—not just because it is beautiful, but... (full context)
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...up to the house, Homer tells Edith and Lurvy that he’s “thought all along” that Wilbur is an “extra good” pig. The three of them agree that Wilbur is indeed “some... (full context)
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...Lurvy begin shaving more often and dressing in fine clothes. Homer instructs Lurvy to feed Wilbur four times a day instead of three, and in all the fuss over Wilbur, they... (full context)
Chapter 12: A Meeting
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...new ideas for another web in order to keep the momentum going and ensure that Wilbur’s life is safe. The goose suggests writing “terrific” in the web, and Charlotte agrees that... (full context)
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...spelling—for new words. Templeton says he doesn’t want to help, as he doesn’t care if Wilbur lives or dies, but the sheep points out that Templeton will be sorry if Wilbur... (full context)
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Charlotte adjourns the meeting and starts working on the web. Wilbur worries aloud, once again, that he is not terrific, but Charlotte sweetly tells him that... (full context)
Chapter 13: Good Progress
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The next morning, when Lurvy arrives to bring Wilbur his breakfast, he is shocked to see Wilbur standing under the web, which now spells... (full context)
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...woodshed—their box has writing on it. The box advertises “new radiant action,” and Charlotte asks Wilbur to show off some radiant action. After his romp, Wilbur does indeed feel radiant. (full context)
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As Wilbur settles in to sleep, he asks Charlotte to tell him a story. She begins telling... (full context)
Chapter 14: Dr. Dorian
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...is helping her mother with the dishes. She tells Mrs. Arable all about Charlotte and Wilbur—the beautiful friendship they have, and the stories Charlotte often shares. Mrs. Arable tells Fern that... (full context)
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...that Fern must be having an “enchanting” time at the barn with the famous pig Wilbur and all of his other barnyard friends. Dr. Dorian has heard the news about the... (full context)
Chapter 15: The Crickets
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Wilbur is the center of attention on the farm and has grown to be a large... (full context)
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One evening, Wilbur asks Charlotte if she’ll be coming along to the fair, but she’s unable to give... (full context)
Chapter 16: Off to the Fair
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...of the fair. Lurvy dreams of playing games and winning prizes, while Homer dreams that Wilbur has grown to a giant size and won every prize. The animals are excited, too,... (full context)
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...discarded junk, he becomes determined to go. Charlotte and Templeton hurriedly stow themselves away in Wilbur’s crate, and warn him to put on a show of struggling when he’s loaded into... (full context)
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The Arables arrive to go with the Zuckermans to the fair, and everyone admires Wilbur’s shiny new appearance—especially Fern, who thinks fondly of the day he was born. As Mr.... (full context)
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Once Wilbur gets to his feet, he is too exhausted to put on a show of struggle... (full context)
Chapter 17: Uncle
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Crowds gather to watch as Wilbur is unloaded from his crate into his new pig pen. The pen is shady and... (full context)
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Throughout the day, as people mill about around Wilbur and Uncle’s pens, Wilbur overhears them making remarks about how large Uncle is and grows... (full context)
Chapter 18: The Cool of the Evening
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...sun starts to set and the fairgrounds grow dark and shadowy, Templeton creeps out of Wilbur’s crate and begins exploring. As he sets out, Charlotte, who has started weaving a new... (full context)
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...the perfect word as it means both “not proud” and “near the ground”—both things describe Wilbur. Templeton heads back out to the fairgrounds to “make a night of it,” knowing it... (full context)
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...The Zuckermans and Arables pile into the truck and drive home for the night, and Wilbur feels grateful to have Charlotte’s company in their absence. As he drifts off to sleep,... (full context)
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Wilbur asks Charlotte what she’s doing, and she says only that she’s “making something.” When Wilbur... (full context)
Chapter 19: The Egg Sac
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In the morning, as the birds begin to sing, Wilbur wakes up and looks around for Charlotte. When he spots her, he sees that she... (full context)
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Charlotte explains to Wilbur that she is “slowing up” and “feeling her age”—but she doesn’t want him to worry... (full context)
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...woven to include the word “humble.” Everyone “rejoice[s]” at “the miracle of the web,” and Wilbur tries to look as humble as possible. As Lurvy feeds Wilbur, though, Avery points out... (full context)
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...they can hardly move, but as reality settles in, they scramble and struggle to get Wilbur ready to face the judges. In the midst of all the commotion around Wilbur, though,... (full context)
Chapter 20: The Hour of Triumph
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At the judges’ table, the fair managers announce that Wilbur is going to receive a “special award.” Wilbur trembles, feeling “happy but dizzy.” Together, the... (full context)
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...valuable tourists” to the area—and the fair especially. The judges tell the gathered fairgoers that Wilbur is indeed “some pig,” and celebrate how “terrific,” “radiant,” and indeed “humble” he is. The... (full context)
Chapter 21: Last Day
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After returning Wilbur to his pen, everyone goes off to find Fern, and Charlotte and Wilbur are left... (full context)
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At Charlotte’s beautiful description of the seasons and their changing, Wilbur becomes tearful and emotional. He asks what he ever did to deserve all of her... (full context)
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Wilbur begins talking about how wonderful it will be for them to all return home to... (full context)
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Wilbur is struck by an idea—if Charlotte can’t bring her egg sac back to the barn,... (full context)
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Templeton creeps down and puts the egg sac at Wilbur’s feet, complaining about the sticky feeling in his mouth. He climbs into Wilbur’s crate just... (full context)
Chapter 22: A Warm Wind
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Wilbur returns home to the barn, but his homecoming is a strange and bittersweet one. He... (full context)
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As the days and weeks go by, Wilbur continues to grow larger in size, but doesn’t worry that Homer will kill him for... (full context)
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All winter, Templeton gorges himself daily on Wilbur’s food, and grows huge and fat. The old sheep chastises him for his greedy—and dangerous—eating... (full context)
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One morning, Wilbur is amazed to see tiny spiders crawling out of the egg sac. They are grey... (full context)
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Wilbur is miserable as he watches all of the spiders float away, and cries himself to... (full context)
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The spiders name themselves Joy, Aranea, and Nellie with Wilbur’s help. Wilbur’s heart is full, and he tells all three of them how devoted he... (full context)
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As the months and years go by, Wilbur is always surrounded by friends. Though Fern does not come to the barn so much... (full context)