Children of Blood and Bone

Children of Blood and Bone

by

Tomi Adeyemi

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Children of Blood and Bone: Chapter Nineteen Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
As they approach Chândomblé, Inan’s magic grows stronger, allowing him to hear the disgruntled thoughts of the guards buzzing like flies in his head. Fighting his powers is physically painful, but Inan feels that he must.
Knowing that his father would be disgusted by Inan’s new identity as a member of a reviled group, Inan fights the magic he feels brewing inside of him. Considering that Saran killed his daughter’s only friend (Binta) for being a divîner, Saran would possibly kill his own son, too.
Themes
Prejudice and Inequality Theme Icon
Duty to Family vs. Self Theme Icon
Inan has a vivid memory of Saran telling him to fight Amari. Amari refused to raise her sword, which Saran took as a sign of weakness. Saran  said that Inan must chose Orïsha over himself by fighting when he does not want to. So, Inan lunged at Amari with his sword. Inan thinks that he failed his sister once, and cannot do it again.
Inan’s most powerful, haunting memory involves choosing to follow his father’s commands over his own sense of right and wrong. The memory also shows again that Saran conflates the ability to commit violence with one’s strength, and even leadership abilities.
Themes
Duty to Family vs. Self Theme Icon
Cycles of Violence Theme Icon