Children of Blood and Bone

Children of Blood and Bone

by

Tomi Adeyemi

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Binta Character Analysis

Binta is a servant in King Saran’s palace and is Amari’s only friend. From the time they were young, the princess and the divîner were very close, imagining someday escaping the palace and seeing Orïsha together. Binta comforted Amari when her family was cruel to her, one day finding and gifting an old headdress to Amari. One day, King Saran brought Binta to the throne room to see the effects of the scroll firsthand. When it unleashed her ability to do light magic, Saran killed Binta immediately. In that moment Amari, watching from behind a curtain, steeled herself against her father and realized that she would need to fight back.

Binta Quotes in Children of Blood and Bone

The Children of Blood and Bone quotes below are all either spoken by Binta or refer to Binta. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Prejudice and Inequality Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Henry Holt and Co. edition of Children of Blood and Bone published in 2018.
Chapter Sixty-Eight Quotes

Binta’s voice rings loud. The sight of her blood fills my head. I can avenge her now. I can cut Father down. While the maji take out the guards, my sword can free Father of his head. Retribution for all his massacres, every poor soul he ever killed […].

Related Characters: Amari (speaker), Binta, King Saran
Page Number: 443
Explanation and Analysis:
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Children of Blood and Bone PDF

Binta Character Timeline in Children of Blood and Bone

The timeline below shows where the character Binta appears in Children of Blood and Bone. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter Three
Duty to Family vs. Self Theme Icon
...with gossipy nobility as her mother criticizes her every move. A servant warns Amari that Binta, a divîner servant and Amari’s only friend, was escorted to Amari’s father, King Saran. (full context)
Prejudice and Inequality Theme Icon
Duty to Family vs. Self Theme Icon
Faith and Tradition Theme Icon
Worried that Binta may be in trouble with her father, King Saran, Amari excuses herself from the room... (full context)
Prejudice and Inequality Theme Icon
Horrified, Amari watches as Binta is dragged into the room by guards. When Kaea forces her to hold the scroll,... (full context)
Prejudice and Inequality Theme Icon
Duty to Family vs. Self Theme Icon
Suddenly, King Saran stabs Binta in the chest with his sword, killing her instantly. Amari runs out of the room... (full context)
Chapter Thirteen
Duty to Family vs. Self Theme Icon
Cycles of Violence Theme Icon
...they worry it won’t be enough for the whole journey. Amari pulls out the headdress Binta once gave her and offers it. Zélie, seeing her sadness, feels a wave of empathy... (full context)
Chapter Fifteen
Prejudice and Inequality Theme Icon
Duty to Family vs. Self Theme Icon
As Amari, Tzain, and Zélie clamber up a mountainside, Amari reminisces about Binta. With a pang, she remembers their dream to travel the world together, a dream that... (full context)
Chapter Sixteen
Duty to Family vs. Self Theme Icon
...heart is in his throat as he remembers the day he cut Amari’s back, when Binta slipped into the infirmary and brought the old headdress to comfort Amari. Inan thinks that... (full context)
Chapter Twenty-Two
Prejudice and Inequality Theme Icon
Duty to Family vs. Self Theme Icon
...have been traversing the desert for days now. As they walk, Amari remembers dreaming with Binta about traveling the world. She remembers that her father warned her that Grounders, divîners with... (full context)
Chapter Twenty-Eight
Duty to Family vs. Self Theme Icon
Cycles of Violence Theme Icon
...position. Tzain tells Amari that she doesn’t have to fight. She’s tempted, but, thinking of Binta, Amari swallows her fear and says she wants to stay. The boats surge into the... (full context)
Chapter Thirty-Four
Duty to Family vs. Self Theme Icon
Cycles of Violence Theme Icon
Amari also feels heartened that they are closer to bringing back magic and to avenging Binta. Tzain tries to convince Amari that she should go home to avoid having to kill... (full context)
Chapter Forty-Nine
Cycles of Violence Theme Icon
As Kwame throws questions at Amari, he punches and stabs Tzain. Amari cries, thinking of Binta and others who have suffered for her. (full context)
Chapter Sixty-Eight
Faith and Tradition Theme Icon
Cycles of Violence Theme Icon
...unafraid to use her sword if need be. She feels a righteous anger, thinking of Binta and all the other maji who have suffered and died because of this man. She... (full context)
Chapter Seventy-Six
Duty to Family vs. Self Theme Icon
...just how wrong Saran was, and to begin to right his wrongs. She thinks of Binta, and, in her head, apologizes to her for not being able to do more. (full context)