Clybourne Park

by

Bruce Norris

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Albert Character Analysis

A black man in his thirties. He is married to Francine, with whom he has three children. Albert is amiable and conscientious. He happily offers to help Bev move the footlocker, and is confused by Francine’s resistance to staying at the Stollers’ home longer than necessary. He has a sharp sense of humor, which is mostly lost on the white residents of Clybourne Park, who react to his jokes uncomfortably. Albert is played by the same actor who plays Kevin in Act II.

Albert Quotes in Clybourne Park

The Clybourne Park quotes below are all either spoken by Albert or refer to Albert. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Race and Racism Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Farrar, Straus and Giroux edition of Clybourne Park published in 2011.
Act 1 Quotes

I tell you, I don’t know what I would do without a friend like Francine here, and on a Saturday, I mean she is just a treasure. What on earth are we going to do up there without her?

Related Characters: Bev Stoller (speaker), Francine, Albert
Page Number: 44
Explanation and Analysis:

Bev: Francine and I have, over the years, the two of us have shared so many wonderful—remember that time the squirrel came through the window?
Francine: Yes, I do.
Bev: That was just the silliest—the two of us were just hysterical weren’t we?

Related Characters: Bev Stoller (speaker), Francine (speaker), Karl Linder, Jim, Albert
Page Number: 72
Explanation and Analysis:

I think they’re all a buncha idiots. And who’s the biggest idiot of all to let yourself get dragged into the middle of it? Whatcha gonna be now, the big peacemaker come to save the day?...Let ‘em knock each other’s brains out, for all I care. I’m done working for these people two days from now, and you never worked for ‘em at all, so what the hell do you care what they do? And now I am going to the goddamn car.

Related Characters: Francine (speaker), Russ Stoller, Bev Stoller, Karl Linder, Albert
Page Number: 94
Explanation and Analysis:

Bev: What about this chafing dish? Did you see this dish?
Albert: Well, we got plenty of dish—
Bev: Not one of these. Francine told me.
Albert: Well, that’s very kind of you, but—
Bev: She said you didn’t have one and somebody should take it and—
Albert: But we don’t need it, ma’am.
Bev: —make use of it, so if you let me just wrap it for you.
Albert: Ma’am, we don’t want your things. Please. We got our own things.
Bev: Well.
Albert: Trying to explain to you.
Bev: Well, if that’s the attitude, then I just don’t know what to say anymore. I really don’t. If that’s what we’re coming to.

Related Characters: Bev Stoller (speaker), Albert (speaker), Francine
Page Number: 95
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Clybourne Park LitChart as a printable PDF.
Clybourne Park PDF

Albert Character Timeline in Clybourne Park

The timeline below shows where the character Albert appears in Clybourne Park. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1
Race and Racism Theme Icon
Disability and Inclusion Theme Icon
Jim goes to open the door for Albert, Francine’s husband, who has come to pick her up. Russ exits upstairs. Jim doesn’t know... (full context)
Race and Racism Theme Icon
Men, Women, and Gender Roles Theme Icon
Albert gets up to wait outside. Bev doesn’t understand why he’s leaving and calls for Francine,... (full context)
Race and Racism Theme Icon
...goodbye to Francine she mentions the footlocker, which still needs to be taken care of. Albert offers to move it, but Francine subtly tries to tell him she wants to leave,... (full context)
Race and Racism Theme Icon
Communication and Miscommunication Theme Icon
...Bev asks Francine if she wants the chafing dish, and once again she declines. As Albert and Francine exit through the front door, they pass Karl Linder, who was about the... (full context)
Communication and Miscommunication Theme Icon
Men, Women, and Gender Roles Theme Icon
Disability and Inclusion Theme Icon
...she ignores him. He acknowledges Betsy because she says hello to him, but ignores Karl. Albert and Francine enter through the front door and go upstairs to deal with the footlocker.... (full context)
Communication and Miscommunication Theme Icon
Albert comes down from upstairs, his jacket off. He tries to interrupt the conversation but is... (full context)
Race and Racism Theme Icon
As Albert and Francine prepare to leave, Jim intercepts them. He wants to know how they would... (full context)
...repeating how nice the neighborhood is. Bev keeps trying, unhelpfully to rephrase Jim’s question, until Albert cuts her off: he understands that Jim is asking how they would feel “living next... (full context)
Race and Racism Theme Icon
Neighborhoods and Ownership Theme Icon
...Karl wonders if Francine would even find food she enjoyed at the local grocery store. Albert jokes he couldn’t shop anywhere that didn’t sell pig feet and collard greens, and Francine... (full context)
Race and Racism Theme Icon
Men, Women, and Gender Roles Theme Icon
Disability and Inclusion Theme Icon
Karl then asks Francine and Albert how they would feel, if white people moved into their neighborhood, reflecting, “that might be... (full context)
Race and Racism Theme Icon
Albert goes to intervene. Francine tries to make him stay out of it, but he puts... (full context)
Race and Racism Theme Icon
Communication and Miscommunication Theme Icon
Bev returns to the living room from the bathroom. She offers to pay Albert for moving the footlocker, which he declines. She insists that “it’s just money,” but he... (full context)