David Copperfield

David Copperfield

Agnes Wickfield is the daughter of Mr. Wickfield, a lawyer with whom David boards while attending Doctor Strong's school. Agnes and David become good friends growing up together, although in Agnes's case, this friendship masks deeper, romantic feelings. Following Dora’s death, David eventually realizes that he loves Agnes as well, and the two marry and have several children together. Agnes is forced to grow up quickly due to her mother’s death and her father’s enduring alcoholism. When David meets her for the first time, Agnes acts as Mr. Wickfield's "housekeeper," more or less running the family's domestic affairs and providing her father with emotional support. In this role, Agnes is competent, loyal, and compassionate, but the strain of taking care of her father does begin to wear on her—particularly when Mr. Wickfield's apprentice, Uriah Heep, uses his position to assume control of the legal practice and to attempt to pressure Agnes into marriage. She is also deeply saddened by David's marriage to Dora Spenlow, not only because Agnes herself is in love with him, but also because she foresees that the marriage will not make David happy. Ultimately, however, Agnes's patience and devotion are rewarded, and the book's final pages depict her as the ideal Victorian woman and wife: selfless, supportive, wise, and virtuous.

Agnes Wickfield Quotes in David Copperfield

The David Copperfield quotes below are all either spoken by Agnes Wickfield or refer to Agnes Wickfield. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Puffin edition of David Copperfield published in 2013.
Chapter 15 Quotes

I cannot call to mind where or when, in my childhood, I had seen a stained glass window in a church. Nor do I recollect its subject. But I know that when I saw her turn round, in the grave light of the old staircase, and wait for us, above, I thought of that window; and that I associated something of its tranquil brightness with Agnes Wickfield ever afterwards.

Related Characters: David Copperfield (speaker), Agnes Wickfield
Related Symbols: Stained Glass Window
Page Number: 194
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 35 Quotes

Wherever Agnes was, some agreeable token of her noiseless presence seemed inseparable from the place. When I came back, I found my aunt's birds hanging, just as they had hung so long in the parlor window of the cottage; and my easy chair imitating my aunt's much easier chair in its position at the open window; and even the round green fan, which my aunt had brought away with her, screwed on to the window-sill. I knew who had done all this, by its seeming to have quietly done itself; and I should have known in a moment who had arranged my neglected books in the open order of my school days, even if I had supposed Agnes to be miles away.

Related Characters: David Copperfield (speaker), Agnes Wickfield, Miss Betsey Trotwood
Page Number: 430
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 39 Quotes

"Weak indulgence has ruined me. Indulgence in remembrance, and indulgence in forgetfulness. My natural grief for my child's mother turned to disease; my natural love for my child turned to disease. I have infected everything I touched."

Related Characters: Mr. Wickfield (speaker), David Copperfield, Agnes Wickfield
Page Number: 482
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 42 Quotes

Some happy talent, and some fortunate opportunity, may form the two sides of the ladder on which some men mount, but the rounds of that ladder must be made of stuff to stand wear and tear; and there is no substitute for thorough-going, ardent, and sincere earnestness. Never to put one hand to anything, on which I could throw my whole self; and never to affect depreciation of my work, whatever it was, I find, now, to have been my golden rules.

How much of the practice I have just reduced to precept, I owe to Agnes, I will not repeat here. My narrative proceeds to Agnes, with a thankful love.

Related Characters: David Copperfield (speaker), Agnes Wickfield, Dora Spenlow
Page Number: 507
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 53 Quotes

"I am afraid it would have been better, if we had only loved each other as a boy and girl, and forgotten it. I have begun to think I was not fit to be a wife.

[…] If I had been more fit to be married, I might have made you more so, too. Besides you are very clever, and I never was."

"We have been very happy, my sweet Dora."

"I was very happy, very. But, as years went on, my dear boy would have wearied of his child-wife. She would have been less and less a companion for him. He would have been more and more sensible of what was wanting in his home. She wouldn't have improved. It is better as it is."

Related Characters: David Copperfield (speaker), Dora Spenlow (speaker), Agnes Wickfield
Related Symbols: Jip
Page Number: 638
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 58 Quotes

I had thought, much and often, of my Dora's shadowing out to me what might have happened, in those years that were destined not to try us; I had considered how the things that never happen, are often as much realities to us, in their effects, as those that are accomplished. The very years she spoke of, were realities now, for my correction […] I endeavoured to convert what might have been between myself and Agnes, into a means of making me more self-denying, more resolved, more conscious of myself, and my defects and errors.

Related Characters: David Copperfield (speaker), Agnes Wickfield, Dora Spenlow
Page Number: 681
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 62 Quotes

And O, Agnes, even out of thy true eyes, in that same time, the spirit of my child-wife looked upon me, saying it was well; and winning me, through thee, to tenderest recollections of the Blossom that had withered in its bloom!

Related Characters: David Copperfield (speaker), Agnes Wickfield, Dora Spenlow
Page Number: 716
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 64 Quotes

O Agnes, O my soul, so may thy face be by me when I close my life indeed; so may I, when realities are melting from me like the shadows which I now dismiss, still find thee near me, pointing upward!

Related Characters: David Copperfield (speaker), Agnes Wickfield
Page Number: 729
Explanation and Analysis:
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Agnes Wickfield Character Timeline in David Copperfield

The timeline below shows where the character Agnes Wickfield appears in David Copperfield. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 15: I Make Another Beginning
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...upstairs, passing many charming nooks and crannies along the way, and meet Mr. Wickfield's daughter, Agnes. Agnes greatly resembles the portrait of the woman David had noticed earlier, and is equipped... (full context)
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As Miss Betsey prepares to leave, Mr. Wickfield and Agnes exit the room to give her and David some privacy. David thanks his aunt again... (full context)
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Later that day, David dines with Mr. Wickfield and Agnes. Afterwards, Agnes sets out glasses and port for her father and goes to play the... (full context)
Chapter 16: I Am a New Boy in More Senses Than One
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Agnes greets David that evening, and the two discuss school; Agnes receives lessons at home so... (full context)
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...to be "one of those" who take advantage of his generosity. Mr. Wickfield, David, and Agnes then prepare to sit down for dinner, but they are interrupted by Uriah Heep, who... (full context)
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Mr. Wickfield, David, and Agnes repeat their previous after-dinner routine, although this time Agnes also looks through David's schoolbooks with... (full context)
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...that he would, and that it isn't any duller for him than it is for Agnes. Mr. Wickfield broods on this for a while, wondering whether Agnes would like to leave... (full context)
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...Mr. Wickfield, expressing profuse gratitude for this. He also lavishes praise on Miss Betsey and Agnes, which David finds unnerving: Uriah "writhes" every time he pays someone a compliment—particularly Agnes, whom... (full context)
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...from an impoverished family. He sees Annie often, in part because she is friends with Agnes—though not, David notices, with Mr. Wickfield. (full context)
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...is present at the Strongs' farewell party for Jack Maldon, which David, Mr. Wickfield, and Agnes also attend. Although she thanks Doctor Strong profusely for finding Maldon a post in India,... (full context)
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Mr. Wickfield, Agnes, and David leave soon afterwards, but David then turns back to fetch a purse Agnes... (full context)
Chapter 17: Somebody Turns Up
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...he reads from the dictionary he is working on. Mr. Dick also meets and befriends Agnes. (full context)
Chapter 18: A Retrospect
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...the head boy, for instance, and cannot imagine ever becoming the head boy himself (though Agnes says he might). He is also infatuated with Miss Shepherd—a girl at a nearby boarding... (full context)
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...up. David decides to fight the butcher and is badly defeated, but takes comfort in Agnes's support. (full context)
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Agnes has also grown up, though she remains David's "counscllor and friend." David, however, is preoccupied... (full context)
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...of "unspeakable bliss." Afterwards, however, he does not see Miss Larkins for several days. Finally, Agnes informs David one evening that Miss Larkins is marrying a hop-grower the following day, which... (full context)
Chapter 19: I Look About Me, and Make a Discovery
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...for three or four weeks. His first stop is Canterbury, where he says goodbye to Agnes and tells her that being apart from her is like missing his "right hand." He... (full context)
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The conversation turns more serious as Agnes asks whether David has noticed any change in Mr. Wickfield. David admits that he has,... (full context)
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Later, Mr. Wickfield, Agnes, and David all go to have tea at Doctor Strong's. The Doctor says he plans... (full context)
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...seems troubled and continues to shoot glances at Doctor Strong and Annie. When Annie and Agnes sing and play duets together, David realizes that Mr. Wickfield disapproves of his daughter's friendship... (full context)
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David is sad to leave Agnes's house, which he realizes he will never live in again. However, he tries very hard... (full context)
Chapter 23: I Corroborate Mr. Dick, and Choose a Profession
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...David's things sent to London, and David gives Miss Betsey a letter to take to Agnes. Miss Betsey leaves the next day, having arranged for David to be provided for financially... (full context)
Chapter 24: My First Dissipation
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...of having his own rooms, although he also finds it lonely at times; he misses Agnes in particular, and Steerforth has not yet visited him. After three days, he goes to... (full context)
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...boxes. Several of their neighbors tell David to be quiet, but David catches sight of Agnes and calls out to her. She also tries to get him to quiet down, before... (full context)
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...He is also deeply ashamed of his behavior and can't stop thinking about having disappointed Agnes. Worse still, he does not know where she is staying, so he realizes he can't... (full context)
Chapter 25: Good and Bad Angels
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...days after David's dinner party, he emerges from his room to find a letter from Agnes. To David's relief, the note does not mention the meeting at the theater, but instead... (full context)
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...the bell. Once inside the drawing room, David is immediately overwhelmed by the sight of Agnes and memories of his time in Canterbury. He begins to cry, and says that he... (full context)
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David protests against this characterization of his friend. Nevertheless, Agnes presses on, saying she is not judging Steerforth by his actions the other night, but... (full context)
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Agnes changes the topic and reminds David that he promised to tell her when he fell... (full context)
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Agnes explains that while her father seemed distressed by Uriah's trip to London (that is, the... (full context)
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Dinner is announced, and David is mildly annoyed that he does not get to escort Agnes to the table. Once seated, the guests begin to talk about social class—or, as Mrs.... (full context)
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David is relieved to rejoin Agnes, whom he introduces to Traddles. He is sad to learn, however, that Agnes is leaving... (full context)
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...whether he can confide in David, and—when David reluctantly agrees—says that David must have noticed Agnes's beauty that evening. David agrees that she looked "superior," and Uriah exclaims delightedly that as... (full context)
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...the sitting room. David, meanwhile, hardly sleeps at all, because he is so anxious about Agnes. He also dreams about stabbing Uriah with the poker and goes to check to make... (full context)
Chapter 26: I Fall into Captivity
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David sees Uriah again a few days later as he says goodbye to Agnes at the coach office. For Agnes's sake, David again tries to be civil with Uriah.... (full context)
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Despite his promise to Agnes, David can't bring himself to tell her about his latest infatuation. Mrs. Crupp, however, manages... (full context)
Chapter 28: Mr. Micawber's Gauntlet
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...particularly David's, because he feels guilty for harboring suspicions of Steerforth after his conversation with Agnes. (full context)
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...as David sees his friend, he regrets ever having doubted him, although he still considers Agnes a "benignant, gentle angel." Meanwhile, Steerforth teases David about having another dinner party and asks... (full context)
Chapter 34: My Aunt Astonishes Me
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David writes to Agnes to tell her of his engagement to Dora, and finds himself thinking of Agnes as... (full context)
Chapter 35: Depression
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...to do next, a coach stops next to him and David looks up to see Agnes inside. David excitedly says that she is the person he most wants to see, and... (full context)
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As they walk, Agnes tells David that Mr. Wickfield and Uriah are in London as well; they are now... (full context)
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Agnes asks whether David knows how Miss Betsey lost her fortune, and seems anxious when he... (full context)
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David tells Agnes and Miss Betsey about his attempts to cancel his apprenticeship, and his aunt says that... (full context)
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Miss Betsey summarizes her financial situation for David and Agnes: she expects to earn about 70 pounds a year from renting the cottage, and Mr.... (full context)
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Agnes suggests that, if David can find the time, he might be able to earn some... (full context)
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When David returns from posting his letter to Doctor Strong, he discovers that Agnes has quietly rearranged the apartment to give it a more homey atmosphere. Miss Betsey seems... (full context)
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...physically: he seems ashamed of himself and his situation, and only greets Miss Betsey after Agnes urges him to do so. Wickfield is also deferential to Uriah, much to David's dismay:... (full context)
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Miss Betsey explains that she has been telling Agnes about her finances, and that Agnes is "worth the whole firm." When Uriah Heep agrees,... (full context)
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...that he is grateful to be of help, ignoring Mr. Wickfield's obvious lack of enthusiasm. Agnes asks whether her father will stay with her and David for a while, and Uriah... (full context)
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...Canterbury, and Mr. Wickfield slowly begins to seem more like himself. David attributes this to Agnes's influence, although Mr. Wickfield never entirely shakes off his melancholy. David then returns with Agnes... (full context)
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After Mr. Wickfield falls asleep, Agnes and David talk about Dora for a while, and David finds he loves Dora more... (full context)
Chapter 36: Enthusiasm
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...enjoy herself. She resists, and—looking very upset—tries to change the subject by asking David about Agnes. Eventually, however, Doctor Strong agrees on his wife's behalf, and Maldon goes to work. The... (full context)
Chapter 39: Wickfield and Heep
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...to see how things are going with her cottage in Dover. David wants to see Agnes anyway, so he arranges to take a few days off from Doctor Strong and from... (full context)
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...town seems to have changed. He also finds that the town itself reminds him of Agnes's calming presence. (full context)
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Mr. Micawber changes the subject, praising Agnes's "attractions, graces, and virtues" and saying that he would think David was in love with... (full context)
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David finds Agnes writing at her desk and they greet one another, with David saying he never knows... (full context)
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David tells Agnes everything that has happened since they last saw one another, saying he "relies" on her.... (full context)
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Finally, David asks Agnes what he should do, and she says that the most "honorable" thing would be to... (full context)
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...up on his offer of a second spare room and goes back upstairs to see Agnes. (full context)
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Much to David's frustration, Mrs. Heep is now in Agnes's room knitting. In an effort to be polite, he asks how she is, and she... (full context)
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...himself alone with Mr. Wickfield and Uriah, who "leers" and "writhes" constantly. They then rejoin Agnes and Mrs. Heep in the drawing room, and Mrs. Heep insists that Agnes play a... (full context)
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As David walks, he debates telling Agnes what he knows about Uriah's designs on her. Before he has gone far, however, he... (full context)
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Uriah (who has already interrupted David many times to praise Agnes) grabs David's hand and kisses it, says that David ought to have "returned his confidence"... (full context)
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...and is very talkative through and after dinner. He drops hints about wanting to marry Agnes and presses Mr. Wickfield to make several toasts (and, consequently, to drink heavily). David, meanwhile,... (full context)
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Uriah proposes a toast to Agnes, describing her as the "divinest of her sex," and finally saying he has more of... (full context)
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...then suggests that he allowed his grief for his deceased wife and his concern for Agnes grow out of hand until they became a "disease" that has ruined Agnes's life as... (full context)
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...Uriah knows, however, and Uriah again scolds Wickfield for speaking so freely. At that moment, Agnes enters the room and escorts her father out, saying he is unwell. Now alone with... (full context)
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At midnight, Agnes stops by and says that she and David should say goodbye now, since he will... (full context)
Chapter 41: Dora's Aunts
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...however, that she spends a lot of time pacing that evening while he writes to Agnes, telling her the good news. David eventually receives a response from Agnes that is "hopeful,... (full context)
Chapter 42: Mischief
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...achieving success, and because he owes so much of his own patience and dedication to Agnes. (full context)
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Around this time, Agnes visits Doctor Strong. Mr. Wickfield comes with her, and both Agnes and the Doctor hope... (full context)
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...about how rudely Maldon used to treat him, and how Mrs. Strong will likely urge Agnes to marry someone of higher social standing than Uriah. For that reason, he says, he... (full context)
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A few days later, David takes Agnes for tea with Dora, anxious for Agnes's approval. Dora is hiding when they arrive, but... (full context)
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Before David and Agnes leave, Dora tells David privately that she thinks she would be "more clever" if she... (full context)
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As Agnes and David walk to Doctor Strong's, David listens eagerly as Agnes praises Dora, feeling that... (full context)
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Agnes says goodnight to David and goes inside Doctor Strong's house. David, however, lingers outside and... (full context)
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...and David retorts that he already expects Uriah to do his "worst" (that is, marry Agnes). (full context)
Chapter 43: Another Retrospect
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...since Sophy is taking part in the ceremony as a bridesmaid. That evening, Sophy and Agnes (who is also a bridesmaid) arrive at Miss Lavinia's and Miss Clarissa's home. Traddles proudly... (full context)
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...her attempts to look "stern." Dora, meanwhile, is trembling throughout the ceremony and clinging to Agnes's hand for support; when the wedding is over, she finally bursts into tears on her... (full context)
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...and David get in the carriage, Dora runs back to say one more goodbye to Agnes. She and David then leave for their new home, and David finally believes he is... (full context)
Chapter 44: Our Housekeeping
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...as well, and Dora wishes aloud that she had had a chance to learn from Agnes. Shyly, she then asks David if he will humor her by calling her a "stupid... (full context)
Chapter 48: Domestic
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...partner for him. He also began to connect these thoughts with his "contented days with Agnes, in the dear old house […] that might have some renewal in another world, but... (full context)
Chapter 49: I Am Involved in Mystery
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...topic that has caused him so much distress. David accordingly asks about Mr. Wickfield and Agnes, and Mr. Micawber praises Agnes as the "only starry spot in a miserable existence." He... (full context)
Chapter 52: I Assist at an Explosion
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...arrive at Wickfield and Heep's, David approaches Mr. Micawber at his desk and asks for Agnes, as Micawber had told him to do. Mr. Micawber then shows David, Traddles, Miss Betsey,... (full context)
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Mr. Micawber shows Agnes in, and David notices that she looks tired and nervous. He also notices that Mr.... (full context)
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...of his "malice, insolence, and hatred." Uriah seems especially enraged over the prospect of losing Agnes, and again accuses David of conspiring with Mr. Micawber. Uriah says that while he has... (full context)
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...and deceiving Mr. Wickfield. This plunged Mr. Micawber into a state of depression, but with Agnes's encouragement, he began to collect information on what Uriah was doing. (full context)
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...felt he had no choice except to give in to Uriah's demands. By this point, Agnes is crying in both sadness and relief. (full context)
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...and the rest of his family, and invites everyone to follow him to his house. Agnes remains behind to comfort Mr. Wickfield, and Traddles stays to guard Uriah, but Mr. Dick,... (full context)
Chapter 53: Another Retrospect
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...room at all. She asks him whether it would be alright for her to ask Agnes to visit, given Mr. Wickfield's condition. David assures her that he will write, and Dora... (full context)
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One night, David is sitting alone with Dora. Agnes and Miss Betsey are present, but downstairs. Although David is aware on some level that... (full context)
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...asks again if it is lonely downstairs, and then says she wants to speak to Agnes in private. David promises to fetch her, and Dora once more repeats that it is... (full context)
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David waits downstairs as Agnes goes to speak with Dora, watching as Jip sleeps uneasily in his dog house. Weeping,... (full context)
Chapter 54: Mr. Micawber's Transactions
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...he is not sure how this idea first came to him. He associates it with Agnes, and suspects she might have suggested it. Regardless, he is deeply aware of and grateful... (full context)
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...and Emily have left for Australia. He therefore returns to Canterbury with Miss Betsey and Agnes and goes directly to Mr. Micawber's, where Traddles is staying. (full context)
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Mr. Micawber and Mrs. Micawber leave David, Agnes, and Miss Betsey alone with Traddles, who is sitting at a table covered in papers.... (full context)
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...spare, so Traddles suggests that he stay in business but take advice from his friends. Agnes is deeply relieved and eager to help her father by supporting and advising him now,... (full context)
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...but that she burned it in his presence and urged him to say nothing for Agnes's sake. Hearing this, Agnes covers her face with her hands. (full context)
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...Micawber, these debts amount to just over 100 pounds. Miss Betsey proposes that she and Agnes jointly provide Micawber with 500 pounds, but David and Traddles strongly urge her not to... (full context)
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The next day, David, Miss Betsey, and Agnes plan to return to London. The Micawbers will follow them as soon as Mr. Micawber... (full context)
Chapter 57: The Emigrants
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...just before setting sail. Traddles (who also knows about the accident) comes with him, and Agnes, Miss Betsey, and Peggotty are already there helping the Micawbers pack. Mr. Micawber is in... (full context)
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...struck by Mr. Peggotty's good humor, and expects that he will do well in Australia. Agnes and Miss Betsey then say their goodbyes, causing both Mrs. Micawber and her children to... (full context)
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...Em'ly sitting with one of the Micawbers' children. He also sees a figure who resembles Agnes embracing and walking away from this woman. He then loses track of both figures, however,... (full context)
Chapter 58: Absence
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...letter that was waiting in town for him. Opening it, he finds it is from Agnes, and mostly expresses concern for his well-being: Agnes says that she is "happy and useful,"... (full context)
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...then admits that at some point he began to feel that he had "thrown away" Agnes's love. It's possible, he says, that this feeling was at the heart of his longstanding... (full context)
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Before returning to England, David therefore decides to keep his love for Agnes a secret. Doing so causes him pain, but he decides to use the loss of... (full context)
Chapter 59: Return
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Sophy tells David that, while on their honeymoon, she and Traddles saw Agnes and Miss Betsey, and that both women were thinking of David. She also says that... (full context)
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...he feels that he has lost any opportunity of having a real "home" by losing Agnes's love. (full context)
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As David is wondering whether he can resign himself to being just a brother to Agnes, he notices that Mr. Chillip is also in the room. David walks over and asks... (full context)
Chapter 60: Agnes
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...what David is thinking, and says that Mr. Wickfield is a "reclaimed man," and that Agnes is "as beautiful, as earnest, [and] as disinterested" as ever. David hesitatingly asks whether Agnes... (full context)
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...his childhood, before the Heeps lived there. As David is looking wistfully out the window, Agnes enters the room. (full context)
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David runs to Agnes and embraces her, trying to thank her for everything she has done for him. Eventually,... (full context)
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David asks Agnes how she has been, and she says that both she and her father are doing... (full context)
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Agnes says that she has to leave David for a while, but explains that he is... (full context)
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...working in a garden he has outside of town. They have dinner and tea with Agnes and several of her students, who leave afterwards. The three reminisce, and Mr. Wickfield says... (full context)
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Agnes hushes Mr. Wickfield, and he changes the subject to Agnes's mother, explaining that she married... (full context)
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Agnes plays some "old airs" on the piano, and then asks David whether he plans to... (full context)
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...speak, saying that Mr. Wickfield's story seems "part of the feeling with which [David] regarded [Agnes]" at their first meeting. Agnes suggests that he simply felt sorry for her, but David... (full context)
Chapter 61: I Am Shown Two Interesting Penitents
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...Uriah and saying he forgives him. Furthermore, he says he hopes that David, Mr. Wickfield, Agnes, and "all of that sinful lot" will see the error of their ways: in fact,... (full context)
Chapter 62: A Light Shines on My Way
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...the next two months, David continues to live with Miss Betsey and pay visits to Agnes, whose encouragement he relies on heavily in his work. At the same time, however, he... (full context)
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...Betsey asks David if he is going to Canterbury to read his manuscript aloud to Agnes. He says that he is, and then asks whether his aunt knows anything more about... (full context)
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After a long, cold ride, David arrives at the Wickfields' to find Agnes done teaching for the day. They discuss David's work and Agnes, who is busy stitching,... (full context)
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David begins to suspect that Agnes might be in love with him, but is afraid he is letting his hopes run... (full context)
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Agnes tries to leave, but David catches her and says that he never planned to tell... (full context)
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David and Agnes go for a walk that evening, and the quietness of their surroundings seems to mirror... (full context)
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The next day, David brings Agnes with him to see Miss Betsey, but does not immediately reveal that they are engaged.... (full context)
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David and Agnes marry about two weeks later, with only Traddles, Sophy, Doctor Strong, and Annie Strong as... (full context)
Chapter 63: A Visitor
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Ten years after David and Agnes marry, David has grown more successful as an author, and his "domestic joy [is] perfect."... (full context)
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...sit by the fire. He tells David how happy he is to see him and Agnes, as well as their children, who remind him of David and little Em'ly as children.... (full context)
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...He says he doesn't mind the long journey, however, and felt he had to see Agnes and David's family before he grew too old. David wants to know all about Mr.... (full context)
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Agnes asks after Emily, and Mr. Peggotty explains that she was initially very depressed, so it... (full context)
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Mr. Peggotty stays with David and Agnes for roughly a month: both Peggotty and Miss Betsey come to London to see him,... (full context)
Chapter 64: A Last Retrospect
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David pictures himself with Agnes and his children, "journeying along the road of life," surrounded by many other people. He... (full context)
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...the end of his story and "subduing [his] desire to linger yet," but that one face—Agnes's—remains with him even as he does so. He sees her next to him, keeping him... (full context)