Democracy in America

by

Alexis de Toqueville

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Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Signet Classic edition of Democracy in America published in 2001.
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Author’s Introduction Quotes

If ever America undergoes great revolutions, they will be brought about by the presence of the black race on the soil of the United States; that is to say, they will owe their origin, not to the equality, but to the inequality of condition.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 313
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 3 Quotes

The people reign in the American political world as the Deity does in the universe. They are the cause and the aim of all things; everything comes from them, and everything is absorbed in them.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 59
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

The only nations which deny the utility of provincial liberties are those which have fewest of them; in other words, those only censure the institution who do not know it.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 77
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 11 Quotes

The great political agitation of American legislative bodies, which is the only one that attracts the attention of foreigners, is a mere episode, or a sort of continuation, of that universal movement which originates in the lowest classes of the people, and extends successively to all the ranks of society. It is impossible to spend more effort in the pursuit of happiness.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 120
Explanation and Analysis:

But if the time be past at which such a choice was possible, and if some power superior to that of man already hurries us, without consulting our wishes, towards one or the other of these two governments, let us endeavor to make the best of that which is allotted to us, and, by finding out both its good and its evil tendencies, be able to foster the former and repress the latter to the utmost.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 124
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 12 Quotes

In my opinion, the main evil of the present democratic institutions of the Untied States does not arise, as is often asserted in Europe, from their weakness, but from their irresistible strength.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 128
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 13 Quotes

The jury teaches every man not to recoil before the responsibility of his own actions, and impresses him with that manly confidence without which no political virtue can exist. It invests each citizen with a kind of magistracy; it makes them all feel the duties which they are bound to discharge towards society, and the part which they take in its government. By obliging men to turn their attention to other affairs than their own, it rubs off that private selfishness which is the rust of society.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 143
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 14 Quotes

Those who hope to revive the monarchy of Henry IV or of Louis XIV appear to me to be afflicted with mental blindness; and when I consider the present condition of several European nations,—a condition to which all the others tend,—I am led to believe that they will soon be left with no other alternative than democratic liberty or the tyranny of the Caesars.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 154
Explanation and Analysis:

But I am very far from thinking that we ought to follow the example of the American democracy, and copy the means which it has employed to attain this end; for I am well aware of the influence which the nature of a country and its political antecedents exercise upon its political constitutions; and I should regard it as a great misfortune for mankind if liberty were to exist all over the world under the same features.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 155
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 16 Quotes

For myself, when I feel the hand of power lie heavy on my brow, I care but little to know who oppresses me; and I am not the more disposed to pass beneath the yoke because it is held out to me by the arms of a million of men.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 171
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 20 Quotes

In the ages in which active life is the condition of almost every one, men are therefore generally led to attach an excessive value to the rapid bursts and superficial conceptions of the intellect; and, on the other hand, to depreciate unduly its slower and deeper labors.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 189
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 23 Quotes

Nothing conceivable is so petty, so insipid, so crowded with paltry interests, in one word, so anti-poetic, as the life of a man in the United States.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 209
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 26 Quotes

I think that democratic communities have a natural taste for freedom: left to themselves, they will seek it, cherish it, and view any privation of it with regret. But for equality, their passion is ardent, insatiable, incessant, invincible: they call for equality in freedom; and if they cannot obtain that, they still call for equality in slavery.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 223
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 29 Quotes

Nothing, in my opinion, is more deserving of our attention than the intellectual and moral associations of America. […] If men are to remain civilized, or to become so, the art of associating together must grow and improve in the same ratio in which the equality of conditions is increased.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 234
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 34 Quotes

I am of opinion, upon the whole, that the manufacturing aristocracy which is growing up under our eyes is one of the harshest which ever existed in the world; but, at the same time, it is one of the most confined and least dangerous. Nevertheless, the friends of democracy should keep their eyes anxiously fixed in this direction; for if ever a permanent inequality of conditions and aristocracy again penetrates into the world, it may be predicted that this is the gate by which they will enter.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 256
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 38 Quotes

Democracy loosens social ties, but tightens natural ones; it brings kindred more closely together, whilst it throws citizens apart.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 271-272
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 45 Quotes

Variety is disappearing from the human race; the same ways of acting, thinking, and feeling are to be met with all over the world. This is not only because nations work more upon each other, and copy each other more faithfully; but as the men of each country relinquish more and more the peculiar opinions and feelings of a caste, a profession, or a family, they simultaneously arrive at something nearer to the constitution of man, which is everywhere the same.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 298
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 54 Quotes

I am of opinion, that, in the democratic ages which are opening upon us, individual independence and local liberties will ever be the products of art; that centralization will be the natural government.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 347
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 56 Quotes

The will of man is not shattered, but softened, bent, and guided; men are seldom forced by it to act, but they are constantly restrained from acting: such a power does not destroy, but it prevents existence; it does not tyrannize, but it compressed, enervates, extinguishes, and stupefies a people, till each nation is reduced to be nothing better than a flock of timid and industrious animals, of which the government is the shepherd.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 356-357
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 57 Quotes

I perceive mighty dangers which it is possible to ward off,—mighty evils which may be avoided or alleviated; and I cling with a firm hold to the belief that, for democratic nations to be virtuous and prosperous, they require but to will it.

Related Characters: Alexis de Tocqueville (speaker)
Page Number: 372
Explanation and Analysis:
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