Don Quixote

Don Quixote

Sansón Carrasco Character Analysis

A nosy student who joins the priest and the barber in their quest to put an end to Quixote's knight-errantry. His desire to improve Quixote's mental health becomes mixed with a desire for revenge. He sometimes masquerades as the Knight of the Spangles as well as the Knight of the White Moon.

Sansón Carrasco Quotes in Don Quixote

The Don Quixote quotes below are all either spoken by Sansón Carrasco or refer to Sansón Carrasco. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
).
Part 2, Chapter 3 Quotes

It’s so very intelligible that it doesn’t pose any difficulties at all: children leaf through it, adolescents read it, grown men understand it and old men praise it, and, in short, it’s so well-thumbed and well-perused and well-known by all kinds of people that as soon as they see a skinny nag pass by they say: “Look, there goes Rocinante.” And the people who have most taken to it are the page-boys. There’s not a lord’s antechamber without its Quixote. … All in all, this history provides the most delightful and least harmful entertainment ever, because nowhere in it can one find the slightest suspicion of language that isn’t wholesome or thoughts that aren’t Catholic.

Related Characters: Sansón Carrasco (speaker), Don Quixote de la Mancha
Get the entire Don Quixote LitChart as a printable PDF.
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Sansón Carrasco Character Timeline in Don Quixote

The timeline below shows where the character Sansón Carrasco appears in Don Quixote. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 2, Chapter 3
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...a book about a knight errant must be accurate and admiring. Sancho returns with Sansón Carrasco, the young student from Salamanca, who tells Don Quixote that he has become the most... (full context)
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Quixote asks Carrasco whether the book described every adventure in detail, hoping that it has omitted some of... (full context)
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Carrasco tells Sancho that he is also an important and beloved character in the book, which... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 4
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Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...days after that he saw the donkey carrying Ginés de Pasamonte and took it back. Carrasco explains, though, that the author mentions Sancho riding the donkey before he retrieves it from... (full context)
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Sancho is concerned that his master attacks too freely and irresponsibly, and warns Quixote and Carrasco that he will take care of his master but he won’t fight for him anymore.... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 7
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The despairing housekeeper runs to find Carrasco and asks him to stop Quixote from running away again. Carrasco promises to do all... (full context)
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As Sancho processes his disappointment, Carrasco comes in and ceremoniously encourages Quixote to set off on his third sally without delay.... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 12
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...Mancha to admit that she is the most beautiful woman in the world. Suddenly the Knight of the Forest hears voices and walks over to the two friends. He talks to Quixote about love... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 14
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The Knight of the Forest tells Quixote that he is in love with a woman named Casildea de Vandalia, who... (full context)
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...to make sure he survived the fall and discovers that the mysterious knight is Sansón Carrasco. The Squire of the Forest runs up to them, without the horrible nose, and asks... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 15
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Carrasco had planned with the priest and the barber to let Quixote leave on his sally... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 16
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...by his recent victory. He and Sancho discuss whether the knight and squire were really Carrasco and Tomé Cecial, as they appeared to be. Quixote explains that since the graduate has... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 50
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...the news that she runs outside to make announcements. She sees the priest and Sansón Carrasco walking down the street and tells them she had become the wife of a governor.... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 64
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...a moon on his shield greets him. He tells Don Quixote that he is the Knight of the White Moon , and he has come to do battle with him over the respective beauties of... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 65
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...find out his true identity. The Knight tells him that he is the student Sansón Carrasco, and he has tricked Quixote into returning to the village so that he might regain... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 70
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Cide Hamete explains that the student Carrasco found out Quixote’s location from the Duke’s page, spoke to the Duke about his adventures... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 73
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They run into the priest and the student Carrasco at the outskirts, and the boys follow them into the village, mocking them all the... (full context)