Down and Out in Paris and London

by

George Orwell

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Paddy Jacques Character Analysis

An Irishman Orwell meets at his first stay in a casual ward, Paddy Jacques is a veteran of the war with a deep knowledge of London’s charitable lodging houses. He is deeply ashamed of being a tramp, but he is well-versed in the tramp’s ways. He has blond, grizzled hair, a sunken face, and a way of walking that suggests he’d rather take a punch than give one. He is an extremely generous man, eager to share what food he has, but also ignorant and determined to remain so. Paddy is one of the more hopeless cases that Orwell meets in his time as a poor man. Given his lack of a complex inner life, Orwell believes that Paddy Jacques is made to be a laborer, but he cannot find work and is therefore doomed to days of monotony and want.

Paddy Jacques Quotes in Down and Out in Paris and London

The Down and Out in Paris and London quotes below are all either spoken by Paddy Jacques or refer to Paddy Jacques. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Mariner Books edition of Down and Out in Paris and London published in 1972.
Chapter 29 Quotes

The fact is that the Salvation Army are so in the habit of thinking themselves a charitable body, that they cannot even run a lodging house without it stinking of charity.

Related Characters: George Orwell (speaker), Paddy Jacques
Page Number: 158
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation long mobile
Chapter 30 Quotes

Another thing to remember is to keep your money covered up, except perhaps a penny in the hat. People won’t give you anything if they see you got a bob or two already.

Related Characters: Bozo (speaker), George Orwell, Paddy Jacques
Page Number: 163
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

The stars are a free show; it don’t cost anything to use your eyes.

Related Characters: Bozo (speaker), George Orwell, Paddy Jacques
Page Number: 164
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Chapter 33 Quotes

An educated man can put up with enforced idleness, which is one of the worst evils of poverty. But a man like Paddy, with no means of filling up time, is as miserable out of work as a dog on the chain. That is why it is such nonsense to pretend that those who have ‘come down in the world’ are to be pitied above all others. The man who really merits pity is the man who has been down from the start, and faces poverty with a blank, resourceless mind.

Related Characters: George Orwell (speaker), Paddy Jacques
Page Number: 180
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

It is curious how people take it for granted that they have a right to preach at you and pray over you as soon as your income falls below a certain level.

Related Characters: George Orwell (speaker), Paddy Jacques
Page Number: 181
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile

A man receiving charity practically always hates his benefactor—it is a fixed characteristic of human nature; and, when he has fifty or a hundred others to back him, he will show it.

Related Characters: George Orwell (speaker), Paddy Jacques
Page Number: 184
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
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Paddy Jacques Character Timeline in Down and Out in Paris and London

The timeline below shows where the character Paddy Jacques appears in Down and Out in Paris and London. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 27
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
Honesty Does Not Pay Theme Icon
Orwell pairs up with Paddy Jacques, a melancholy Irishman, and the two set out to make the 12-mile walk to... (full context)
Chapter 28
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
In Orwell’s opinion, Paddy Jacques is a typical English tramp of his time—ignorant and determined to remain that way,... (full context)
Chapter 29
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
For Orwell and Paddy, another day means another casual ward. The Edbury spike is notable only for the fact... (full context)
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
Eventually, Orwell and Paddy end up at a Salvation Army shelter, which Orwell contends is gloomier than a spike,... (full context)
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
...order them to go to bed, which they do in a dormitory-like room. Orwell and Paddy get hardly any sleep thanks to a man near them who calls out “Pip!” loudly... (full context)
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
Distrust of the Other Theme Icon
...to visit his friend B. and asks for a pound—B. gives him two. Orwell and Paddy then find another lodging house to stay in for the night—a dark, unpleasant place that... (full context)
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Honesty Does Not Pay Theme Icon
...time later to a man trying to steal the money from underneath his pillow. Thieves, Paddy tells Orwell, are simply a fact of life in lodging houses. (full context)
Chapter 30
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty as Opportunity Theme Icon
Orwell and Paddy go in search of Paddy’s friend Bozo, a pavement artist. They find him on the... (full context)
Poverty as Opportunity Theme Icon
...and he returns to the Embankment later on that night. Bozo then leads Orwell and Paddy to a lodging house he knows of south of the river. Bozo stops to star... (full context)
Chapter 33
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
Orwell and Paddy try for jobs as sandwich men but they find a long line of other prospective... (full context)
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
While Orwell and Paddy lounge in a lodging house, a slumming party, or group of well-off people eager to ... (full context)
Poverty as Opportunity Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
With the loan from B. dwindling to nothing, Orwell and Paddy go to a church near King’s Cross Station that offers free tea to tramps once... (full context)
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
Honesty Does Not Pay Theme Icon
Able to afford exactly one more night’s lodging (thanks to Paddy’s petty thievery), Paddy and Orwell travel to the Embankment where a clergyman is said to... (full context)
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty as Opportunity Theme Icon
Back at the lodging house, Orwell and Paddy loaf around. After a while, Bozo shows up, a little short of the money he... (full context)
Chapter 34
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
Orwell and Paddy set out for a spike that is sixteen miles away. Having spent the last several... (full context)
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
Honesty Does Not Pay Theme Icon
Orwell and Paddy set out for another spike. Again, they arrive before it opens, so Paddy begs at... (full context)
Chapter 35
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
Honesty Does Not Pay Theme Icon
Orwell and Paddy and a number of other tramps, including Bill, Fred, William, and a woman who considers... (full context)
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty as Opportunity Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
...rations of bread on a spike in protest of the bread’s hardness, and Orwell and Paddy begin the trek back to London. On their way, they meet Scotty, a Glaswegian tramp,... (full context)
Chapter 38
Poverty as Prison Theme Icon
Poverty as Opportunity Theme Icon
Poverty is Unnecessary Theme Icon
Orwell’s time as a tramp comes to an end. He parts ways with Paddy and secures a two-pound loan from B., living on that money until his work with... (full context)