Edward II

by

Christopher Marlowe

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After Gaveston's death, Edward II relies instead on the support and advice of two of Gaveston's former retainers: Spencer Junior and his father, Spencer Senior. Neither man is well born, but (as he had with Gaveston) Edward grants them noble status: Spencer Junior thus becomes the Earl of Cornwall—the position Gaveston himself had held. It is less clear whether Spencer also assumes Gaveston's role as the king's lover, because while Spencer does stand by (and attempt to influence) Edward, the two men never speak particularly passionately or personally to one another.

Spencer Junior Quotes in Edward II

The Edward II quotes below are all either spoken by Spencer Junior or refer to Spencer Junior . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Methuen Drama edition of Edward II published in 2014.
Act 2, Scene 1 Quotes

You must cast the scholar off
And learn to court it like a gentleman…
You must be proud, bold, pleasant, resolute,
And now and then, stab, as occasion serves.

Related Characters: Spencer Junior (speaker), Baldock
Page Number: 2.1.31–43
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 3, Scene 2 Quotes

Edward: O, shall I speak, or shall I sigh and die?

Spencer Junior: My lord, refer your vengeance to the sword
Upon these barons.

Related Characters: Edward II (speaker), Spencer Junior (speaker), Piers Gaveston, Guy, Earl of Warwick
Page Number: 3.2.121—123
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 3, Scene 3 Quotes

Mortimer Junior: Then, Edward, thou wilt fight it to the last,
And rather bathe thy sword in subjects' blood
Than banish that pernicious company?

Edward: Ay, traitors all! Rather than thus be braved,
Make England's civil towns huge heaps of stones
And ploughs to go about our palace gates.

Warwick: A desperate and unnatural resolution.

Related Characters: Edward II (speaker), Mortimer Junior (speaker), Guy, Earl of Warwick (speaker), Spencer Junior
Page Number: 3.3.27–33
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 4, Scene 6 Quotes

Spencer, I see our souls are fleeted hence;
We are deprived the sunshine of our life.
Make for a new life, man; throw up thy eyes,
And heart and hand to heaven's immortal throne,
Pay nature's debt with cheerful countenance.
Reduce we all our lessons unto this:
To die, sweet Spencer, therefore live we all;
Spencer, all live to die, and rise to fall.

Related Characters: Baldock (speaker), Edward II, Spencer Junior
Related Symbols: The Sun
Page Number: 4.6.104–111
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Edward II LitChart as a printable PDF.
Edward II PDF

Spencer Junior Character Timeline in Edward II

The timeline below shows where the character Spencer Junior appears in Edward II. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 2, Scene 1
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Spencer Junior and Baldock—two retainers of the recently deceased Earl of Gloucester—enter, discussing whom they should serve... (full context)
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
Baldock reminds Spencer Junior that Gaveston is exiled and can therefore do little to help him, but Spencer says... (full context)
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Lady Margaret's arrival interrupts Baldock and Spencer Junior's banter, and the two men listen as she reads aloud from letters from Gaveston and... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 2
Language and Violence Theme Icon
Edward, Isabella, Lancaster, Mortimer Junior, Warwick, Pembroke, and Kent are waiting for Gaveston's arrival. The King is impatient and preoccupied... (full context)
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Fear of the Other and Internal Discord Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
Mortimer Junior describes the scene that will decorate his shield: “A lofty cedar tree fair flourishing…And by... (full context)
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
In an aside to the other nobles, Mortimer Junior worries that Gaveston's presence will just deepen Edward's fervor. At that very moment, however, Gaveston... (full context)
Fear of the Other and Internal Discord Theme Icon
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
As Gaveston leaves, Isabella laments Mortimer Junior's rash actions. Mortimer, unrepentant, implies that his only regret is that he didn’t kill Gaveston.... (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
Warwick, Mortimer Junior, Lancaster, and Pembroke are now more convinced than ever of the need for Gaveston's death.... (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
As the nobles make plans, a messenger arrives with a letter from Scotland, informing Mortimer Junior that his uncle, Mortimer Senior, is being held for ransom. Mortimer feels that Edward should... (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
A guard arrives just as Mortimer Junior is hinting darkly at what he will do if Edward does not agree to his... (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
Edward begins to complain about the behavior of Lancaster and Mortimer Junior, but the nobles cut him off in order to list their own grievances: that the... (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
Mortimer Junior and Lancaster leave, resolving to sell the Mortimer castle for ransom money and then “purchase... (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
...nobles going to war, and Edward again taunts her about her supposed affair with Mortimer Junior. Lady Margaret and Gaveston, who have entered with Isabella, urge Edward to be kinder to... (full context)
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Fear of the Other and Internal Discord Theme Icon
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Edward and Gaveston discuss what to do about Mortimer Junior now that he is openly threatening “civil wars”: Gaveston favors imprisoning or murdering him, but... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 4
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Fighting is already underway as the scene opens and Edward frantically questions Spencer Junior as to Gaveston's whereabouts. Just then, however, he catches sight of Gaveston, and the two... (full context)
Fear of the Other and Internal Discord Theme Icon
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Lancaster, Warwick, and Mortimer Junior burst in. They are searching for Edward, and Mortimer interrupts Isabella's lament about her efforts... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 2
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
Edward waits anxiously with Spencer Junior and Baldock. He knows that he cannot save Gaveston's life, and fears that the nobles... (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Spencer Senior, Spencer Junior's father, arrives and announces that he has brought a company of soldiers to defend Edward's... (full context)
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Fear of the Other and Internal Discord Theme Icon
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Spencer Junior notices Isabella approaching with Prince Edward and Levune, a messenger from France. Edward II asks... (full context)
Fear of the Other and Internal Discord Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
...beheading of Gaveston. Edward despairingly wonders whether he should “speak, or…sigh and die?”, but Spencer Junior—who remarks that Warwick's actions are “flatly against law of arms”—urges the King to “refer [his]... (full context)
Language and Violence Theme Icon
...in blood, / And stain my royal standard with the same.” He then makes Spencer Junior Earl of Gloucester and Lord Chamberlain—two of Gaveston's former positions. (full context)
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Fear of the Other and Internal Discord Theme Icon
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
Spencer Junior remarks that a herald has arrived from the nobles. The herald greets Edward and reports... (full context)
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
...no right to dictate the King's “sports, his pleasures, and his company.” He embraces Spencer Junior to prove his point. He further orders the herald to tell the nobles that he... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 3
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
...intends to “pour vengeance” on everyone who is up in arms against their sovereign. Spencer Junior shares his belief that “right will prevail,” but Spencer Senior remarks that their forces are... (full context)
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Fear of the Other and Internal Discord Theme Icon
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Mortimer Junior, Kent, Lancaster, Warwick, and Pembroke appear, and the two sides exchange boasts and insults. Lancaster... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 4
Fortune and Tragedy Theme Icon
As trumpets sound, Edward, Spencer Senior, Spencer Junior, Baldock, and Levune appear, and they have a number of nobles (Kent, Warwick, Lancaster, and... (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Fortune and Tragedy Theme Icon
Mortimer Junior laments the state of the country, which he addresses directly: “England, unkind to thy nobility,... (full context)
Fear of the Other and Internal Discord Theme Icon
Spencer Junior instructs Levune to go to France and bribe the king and nobility there to withhold... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 2
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
...is determined not to leave her side until he is old enough to challenge Spencer Junior. Isabella, for her part, remarks proudly on how hopeful her son makes her and agrees... (full context)
Fear of the Other and Internal Discord Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
Fortune and Tragedy Theme Icon
Isabella is surprised to see Kent and Mortimer Junior, whom she had heard were dead. Mortimer, however, explains that he is "reserved for better... (full context)
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Sir John urges Kent and Mortimer Junior to accompany Isabella to Hainault, where they will be able to raise both money and... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 3
Fear of the Other and Internal Discord Theme Icon
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
...victory and the fact that he has gotten his own way with regards to Spencer Junior. He asks Maltravers to read the list of executed rebels, and then gloats that Isabella's... (full context)
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
A messenger arrives from France with a letter for Spencer Junior from Levune. It explains both that Levune succeeded in buying off the French nobility and... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 5
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Battle is once more underway, and Edward's forces are in disarray. Spencer Junior urges the King to flee to Ireland, but Edward refuses, vowing to fight to the... (full context)
Sex, Lineage, and the Natural Order Theme Icon
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
...“punish this unnatural revolt.” However, he then chastises himself for speaking so openly, knowing Mortimer Junior will kill him if he discovers his loyalties have changed. Finally, Kent confirms for the... (full context)
Fortune and Tragedy Theme Icon
Isabella, Mortimer Junior, Prince Edward, and Sir John now appear as well. Isabella appoints Prince Edward viceroy and... (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Kent asks Isabella what she intends to do with Edward II, and Mortimer Junior grows irritated, saying that that is a matter for Parliament to decide. Privately, however, he... (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
As the group discusses the whereabouts of Spencer Junior and Baldock, Rhys ap Howell (a Welsh lord),  and the Mayor of Bristol enter. Rhys... (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
Mortimer Junior gives orders for Spencer Senior's execution, but the latter condemns Mortimer and Isabella as “rebels”... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 6
Fortune and Tragedy Theme Icon
Edward II, Baldock, and Spencer Junior have disguised themselves and taken refuge in a monastery. The Abbot assures Edward that he... (full context)
Language and Violence Theme Icon
Despite the monks' reassurances, Spencer Junior fears that their location will be betrayed. Baldock explains that bad weather thwarted their voyage... (full context)
Fear of the Other and Internal Discord Theme Icon
Suddenly, Spencer Junior urges Edward to look up: Rhys ap Howell and the Earl of Leicester have discovered... (full context)
Fortune and Tragedy Theme Icon
...and quotes a Latin proverb about the precariousness of power. Aloud, however, he arrests Spencer Junior and Baldock for treason. (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Fortune and Tragedy Theme Icon
..."lour[ed] unkindly on a king" before inviting Leicester to kill him rather than imprison Spencer Junior and Baldock. Edward then begins to say his goodbye to his companions, blaming their misfortunes... (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Fortune and Tragedy Theme Icon
...unmoved, however, Edward remarks that “that shall be shall be” and bids farewell to Spencer Junior and Baldock before Leicester escorts him from the room. (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
Language and Violence Theme Icon
Fortune and Tragedy Theme Icon
Spencer Junior and Baldock mourn their parting with Edward, likening him both to the sun and to... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 3
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
...he will ever be allowed to rest, and offers up his heart to satisfy Mortimer Junior's desire for revenge. He then remarks that he will likely die soon anyway: he is... (full context)
Monarchy, Legitimacy, and Loyalty Theme Icon
...saying that he is now suffering for his sake, as Gaveston and Spencer Senior and Junior died for him. (full context)