Enduring Love

by

Ian McEwan

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John Logan Character Analysis

John Logan is a family doctor who lives with his wife, Jean, and their children, Rachael and Leo, in Oxford. A former mountain-rescue worker, Logan rushes unhesitatingly toward the scene of the ballooning accident and loses his life in part because his courage exceeds that of the rest of the group. When the other men attempting to hold down the runaway hot air balloon release their ropes, Logan, who is still holding on, is carried into the air and falls to his death, a turn of events that emphasizes Logan’s commitment to the cause of aiding a child in danger. Though his wife briefly suspects that Logan was having an affair in the months before the accident, she later learns that this was not, in fact, the case. Instead, Logan was practicing his habitual kindness yet again: offering a ride to a friend whose car had broken down (and whose affair with a younger woman is the relationship Jean mistakenly attributes to her husband). Throughout the novel, John Logan is consistently spoken of as “brave” by the other characters, and, indeed, much of Clarissa’s sorrow after the accident is due to the fact that a “good man” has perished.

John Logan Quotes in Enduring Love

The Enduring Love quotes below are all either spoken by John Logan or refer to John Logan. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Anchor Books edition of Enduring Love published in 1998.
Chapter 1 Quotes

I should make something clear. There may have been a vague communality of purpose, but we were never a team. There was no chance, no time. Coincidences of time and place, a predisposition to help, had brought us together under the balloon. No one was in charge—or everyone was, and we were in a shouting match.

Related Characters: Joe Rose (speaker), Jed Parry, John Logan, James Gadd, Joseph Lacey, Toby Greene
Page Number: 11
Explanation and Analysis:

Every fraction of a second that passed increased the drop, and the point must come when to let go would be impossible or fatal. And compared with me, Harry was safe, curled up in the basket. The balloon might well come down safely at the bottom of the hill. And perhaps my impulse to hang on was nothing more than a continuation of what I had been attempting moments before, simply a failure to adjust quickly.

Page Number: 14
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 24 Quotes

This breathless scrambling for forgiveness seemed to me almost mad, Mad Hatterish, here on the riverbank where Lewis Carroll, the dean of Christ Church, had once entertained the darling objects of his own obsessions. I caught Clarissa’s eye and we exchanged a half-smile, and it was as if we were pitching our own requests for mutual forgiveness, or at least tolerance, in there with Jean’s and Reid’s frantic counterpoint. I shrugged as though to say that, like her in her letter, I just did not know.

Page Number: 247-248
Explanation and Analysis:
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Enduring Love PDF

John Logan Character Timeline in Enduring Love

The timeline below shows where the character John Logan appears in Enduring Love. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
...toward the balloon, the wind drops for a moment, and Joe slows his pace. Yet John Logan, another of the men rushing toward the balloon, continues running at full speed. John... (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
...many more steps. Joe begins to run again but is beat to the balloon by John Logan, who takes hold of another of the dangling ropes. When Joe finally arrives at... (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
...his telling, the men have come to the edge of the slope. Beside Joe is John Logan, whom Joe now reveals to be “a family doctor from Oxford” and a member... (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
...from the basket, James Gadd is trying to climb over them, and Jed Parry and John Logan are shouting their own suggestions. As the great gust of wind arrives, James Gadd... (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
...into the air, taking the five remaining men—Joe, Jed Parry, Joseph Lacey, Toby Greene, and John Logan—with it. Joe recounts the infinitesimally brief moment of thought that follows: either he must... (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
...to the ground, as, around him, do Jed Parry, Joseph Lacey, and Toby Greene. Only John Logan continues to hang on, and with only his small weight to hold the balloon... (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
By the time Joe regains his footing, the balloon, and John Logan, are “fifty yards away” and very high in the air. Unable to believe what... (full context)
Chapter 2
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
In the moments immediately after John Logan’s fall, Joe again slows the pace of his narrative, indicating that he wishes to... (full context)
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...states that “sorrow seem[s] a long way off” to him. Joe takes note of where John Logan’s body has landed—in a second field at the base of the slope—but, as he... (full context)
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...even euphoric, Joe telephones the police then strides down the hill in the direction of John Logan’s body. Perversely, Joe has convinced himself that Logan might still be alive, and though... (full context)
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
He pauses to urinate against a tree trunk then approaches Logan’s body from the rear. He notices sheep grazing in the field, and though he wants... (full context)
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
When Joe finally looks straight at Logan’s body, the corpse seems to him like “some stumpy antenna of [Logan’s] present or previous... (full context)
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
As Joe looks at Logan’s body, he is joined by Jed Parry, who has come down the hill behind him.... (full context)
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...but by smiling. As the chapter ends, two policemen are striding down the hill to Logan’s body, and Parry is looking at Joe with a “radiating” expression of “love and pity.” (full context)
Chapter 3
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...but they are drawn inevitably back to what they could have done themselves to save John Logan. (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...they are, for the moment, locked, they cannot escape it for long, returning instead to Logan’s fall. Overwhelmed by the horror of the memory, the two of them retreat “into the... (full context)
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...tell Clarissa that he loves her, but instead he is drawn to a description of John Logan’s body, confessing that it is “far worse in recollection than it had been at... (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...are back in their seats, going over the story once more. When Clarissa insists that Logan “was a good man,” Joe is reminded of “the routine surgical procedure that left Clarissa... (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...that the child, Harry Gadd, is unharmed. Neither Joe nor Clarissa wants to believe that John Logan “died for nothing,” but Clarissa goes a step further, insisting that Logan’s death “must... (full context)
Chapter 4
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
...the piece, Joe telephones the police and learns that he must attend an inquest concerning John Logan’s death in six weeks’ time. He takes a taxi across town to meet with... (full context)
Chapter 6
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
...unadorned table on his side of the roof the next morning, Joe thinks again about John Logan and his responsibility for Logan’s death. He examines the rope burns on his hands... (full context)
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
Picturing that prospective scene, Joe imagines Jean Logan dressed in black with children clinging to her knees. Soon enough, however, this creation of... (full context)
Chapter 12
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
Two days after the arrival of Parry’s letter, Joe drives to Oxford to visit John Logan’s widow, Jean Logan. In his thoughts is his “sense of failure at science,” an... (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Fifteen minutes away from Jean Logan’s house now, Joe considers why he has come. He has spoken to Jean on the... (full context)
Chapter 13
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
A grief-stricken Jean Logan meets Joe at the door. Following her inside, Joe reflects upon the house’s décor, which... (full context)
Obsession Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...She asks Joe if “one door or two” were open on the car from which John Logan ran into the field, and she speculates that whoever was with him must have... (full context)
Chapter 14
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
As he stares at Jean Logan’s children, Joe reflects on his and Clarissa’s history with kids. Though Joe has “never looked... (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
...the situation fully. For the children’s benefit as well as Jean’s, Joe states loudly that John Logan was “a very determined and courageous man” and that, by refusing to let go... (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
As Joe finishes these remarks, Jean Logan begins to respond. She agrees that her husband was brave, but she insists simultaneously that... (full context)
Obsession Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
As Joe prepares to leave, Jean Logan gives him the names and telephone numbers of the other accident witnesses, whom she means... (full context)
Chapter 15
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...drives through the Chilterns and revisits the scene of the ballooning accident. He parks where John Logan’s car was parked and imagines what the woman with Logan might have been able... (full context)
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
...each of the important places from the day of the accident, including the spots where John Logan fell and where Jed Parry asked Joe to pray. Joe feels, strangely, as if... (full context)
Chapter 17
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...simultaneously realizes that he feels “nothing at all.” Instead, his thoughts jump, “froglike,” to Jean Logan, with whom Joe now understands Clarissa to have something in common. Both are women who... (full context)
Obsession Theme Icon
Thinking about Jean Logan immediately puts Joe in mind of the errand she has set him on, despite the... (full context)
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Clarissa herself, Joe recalls, is unsure about the number of doors she saw open on John Logan’s car, but she is certain that she didn’t see a woman. Joe remembers briefly... (full context)
Chapter 24
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
Arriving at Jean Logan’s house, Joe and Clarissa are greeted by Leo, who is “naked but for face paint... (full context)
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
Joe asks Jean Logan to hear the “story” he wishes to communicate “at first hand.” He makes a telephone... (full context)
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...rejoin the others by the picnic. There, the children share a memory of their father, John Logan, and a family vacation on which they accompanied him. Joe feels as if the... (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...a while, a man and a younger woman approach the group and join them. Jean Logan expresses concern about whether she can “meet” this woman, and Clarissa assures her that “it’s... (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
...to the accident,” Lacey assured them. Now, however, Reid sees that he has caused Jean Logan “distress,” and he apologizes to her with great sincerity. (full context)
The Importance of Loyalty Theme Icon
Rationalism vs. Intuition Theme Icon
Obsession Theme Icon
The Nature of Love Theme Icon
Rather than taking comfort from James Reid’s story, Jean Logan is further distraught. “Who,” she asks, “is going to forgive [her]” for doubting her husband’s... (full context)