Every Man in His Humour

by

Ben Jonson

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Every Man in His Humour: Act 4, Scene 3 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Kitely comes in, wondering about the cause of the commotion. Wellbred blames it on “one of my brother’s ancient humours” and leaves, with Stephen, Bobadil, Matthew, Edward and Brainworm in tow. Downright rants about Wellbred, Bobadil, and Matthew. Bridget criticizes him for being too angry.
Wellbred is implying that Downright’s behavior is excessively “choleric.” Bridget, like Dame Kitely earlier, acts to a degree as a voice of reason.
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Bridget and Dame Kitely praise Edward, with Bridget suggesting she has affections for him. Dame Kitely says he is “of an exceeding fair disposition, and of very excellent good parts!” After they exit, Kitely misinterprets “parts” to mean Edward’s body, rather than the most likely intended meaning of personal qualities. Kitely thinks the “gallants” are hiding in the house and goes in to search.
Bridget’s praise for Edward sets up their betrothal later in the play. Again, a word is taken in a way that it is not necessarily intended. By “parts,” Dame Kitely most likely means “characteristics” rather than bodily parts. Kitely’s jealousy ensures he can only take it one way, however.
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