Every Man in His Humour

by

Ben Jonson

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Downright Character Analysis

Downright is a no-nonsense squire with a fiery temper, and Wellbred’s half-brother. He frequently rubs people up the wrong way and lacks tact, resulting in his feud with Captain Bobadil and Master Matthew. The roguish behavior of Wellbred and his entourage angers Downright, at one point causing him to blame Dame Kitely for allowing the young gallants to spend time at her house. He is, however, considerably braver than the boastful Bobadil. When the two men nearly come to blows, Downright quickly disarms his opponent; Matthew, for his part, runs away. Downright roughly represents anger—or “choler” in the scheme of the four humours—but also acts as counterfoil to Matthew and Bobadil’s pretentiousness. He is, in a word, authentic.

Downright Quotes in Every Man in His Humour

The Every Man in His Humour quotes below are all either spoken by Downright or refer to Downright. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Oxford University Press edition of Every Man in His Humour published in 2009.
Act 4, Scene 8 Quotes

No harm done, brother, I warrant you: since there is no harm done, Anger costs a man nothing: and a tall man is never his own man, till he be angry. To keep his valour in obscurity, is to keep himself, as it were, in a cloak bag. What's a musician, unless he play? What's a tall man, unless he fight? For, indeed, all this, my wise brother stands upon, absolutely: and that made me fall in with him so resolutely.

Related Characters: Wellbred (speaker), Downright, Kitely
Page Number: 78
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 5, Scene 2 Quotes

JUSTICE CLEMENT: Nay, keep out, sir; I know not your pretence. You send me word, sir, you are a soldier: why, sir, you shall be answered, here, here be them that have been amongst soldiers. Sir, your pleasure.

BOBADIL: Faith, sir, so it is, this gentleman, and myself, have been most uncivilly wronged, and beaten, by one Downright, a coarse fellow, about the town, here, and for mine own part, I protest, being a man in no sort given to this filthy humour of quarrelling, he hath assaulted me in the way of my peace; despoiled me of mine honour; disarmed me of my weapons; and rudely, laid me along, in the open streets: when I not so much as once offered to resist him.

JUSTICE CLEMENT: Oh God's precious! Is this the soldier? Here, take my armour off quickly, ‘twill make him swoon, I fear; he is not fit to look on't, that will put up a blow.

Related Characters: Captain Bobadil (speaker), Justice Clement (speaker), Wellbred, Downright
Related Symbols: Swords
Page Number: 90-91
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 5, Scene 3 Quotes

JUSTICE CLEMENT: Why, Master Downright, are you such a novice, to be served, and never see the warrant?

DOWNRIGHT: Sir. He did not serve it on me.

JUSTICE CLEMENT: No? how then?

DOWNRIGHT: Marry, sir, he came to me, and said, he must serve it, and he would use me kindly, and so—

JUSTICE CLEMENT: Oh, God's pity, was it so, sir? He must serve it? Give me my longsword there, and help me off; so. Come on, sir varlet, I must cut off your legs, sirrah; nay, stand up, I'll use you kindly, I must cut off your legs, I say.

Related Characters: Downright (speaker), Justice Clement (speaker), Brainworm
Related Symbols: Swords
Page Number: 90-91
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 5, Scene 5 Quotes

JUSTICE CLEMENT: Good complement! It will be their bridal night too. They are married anew. Come, I conjure the rest, to put off all discontent. You, master Downright, your anger; you, master Knowell, your cares; Master Kitely and his wife, their jealousy.

[…]

'Tis well, 'tis well! This night we'll dedicate to friendship, love, and laughter. Master bridegroom, take your bride and lead; everyone, a fellow. Here is my mistress, Brainworm! To whom all my addresses of courtship shall have their reference. Whose adventures, this day, when our grandchildren shall hear to be made a fable, I doubt not, but it shall find both spectators, and applause.

Page Number: 97
Explanation and Analysis:
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Downright Character Timeline in Every Man in His Humour

The timeline below shows where the character Downright appears in Every Man in His Humour. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, Scene 5
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Matthew complains to Bobadil about an argument he had with Downright, the no-nonsense half-brother of Wellbred, about men’s fashion. Matthew goes on to say that Downright... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 1
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...a cloth merchant, stands in front of his house with his assistant, Thomas Cash, and Downright. Kitely sends Cash away to complete a transaction for him and converses with Downright, explaining... (full context)
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Kitely has a thorny issue to bring up with Downright—Wellbred. The latter man, who lodges with Kitely, seems to have taken an “irregular” course and... (full context)
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Downright is annoyed to hear of Wellbred’s lewd behavior, and predicts he’ll end up in one... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 2
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...that he did not return to his lodging last night, but not before Bobadil calls Downright a “scavenger.” Kitely has to restrain Downright from going after Bobadil. Kitely implores Downright not... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 1
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...Wellbred that they were looking for him earlier. Bobadil tries to complain to Wellbred about Downright, but Wellbred insists he change the topic of conversation. (full context)
Act 4, Scene 1
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Back at Kitely’s, Downright chastises Dame Kitely for allowing Wellbred and his entourage into the house. He blames her,... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 2
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...Brainworm all enter at Kitely’s house. Matthew intends to read some poetry to Bridget, causing Downright to leave; he’d rather “endure the stocks.” (full context)
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...Matthew “who made these verses.” Matthew claims to have written them, “extempore,” that very morning. Downright re-enters, increasingly vexed by the people present. Wellbred implores Bridget not to accept Matthew’s advances,... (full context)
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Downright takes offence at Wellbred’s use of the word “tricks.” Tensions between them quickly ramp up,... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 3
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...my brother’s ancient humours” and leaves, with Stephen, Bobadil, Matthew, Edward and Brainworm in tow. Downright rants about Wellbred, Bobadil, and Matthew. Bridget criticizes him for being too angry. (full context)
Act 4, Scene 5
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...the Windmill tavern, Edward and Wellbred instruct Brainworm, still disguised, to take a message to Downright. They talk about Bridget Kitely, whom Edward admits he has affections for. Wellbred promises Edward... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 7
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Matthew, Edward, Bobadil, and Stephen speak disparagingly about Downright. Bobadil states that, with what he taught Matthew earlier about fighting, the latter should be... (full context)
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...right men and teach them how to fight properly. Edward (probably sarcastically) points out that Downright ought to be afraid of Bobadil. (full context)
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Just then, Downright arrives. Amazed that he has run into “these bragging rascals” yet again, he tells Bobadil... (full context)
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Downright leaves. Bobadil tries to excuse his cowardly behavior to Edward and Stephen by claiming he... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 8
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Back at Kitely’s house, Wellbred explains to Kitely and Dame Kitely that anger is in Downright’s nature—and that there was “no harm done” in the earlier altercation. Dame Kitely says that... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 9
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...their excuses. When Brainworm comes by, dressed as Roger Formal, they complain to him about Downright and ask for an arrest warrant. Brainworm says he will give them what they want... (full context)
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...and Matthew give Brainworm jewelry and silk stockings in exchange for a warrant. Matthew describes Downright as a “tall big man” wearing a cloak with “russet lace.” Brainworm promises to get... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 11
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...Bobadil on a street. He tells them that he is on his way to arrest Downright. As Stephen comes in wearing Downright’s cloak, Brainworm puts him under arrest. (full context)
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Stephen protests his innocence; Bobadil points out that he is wearing the same cloak as Downright. Just then, Downright comes in. Brainworm in turn tries to serve him with the warrant... (full context)
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Downright asks for his cloak back. With Stephen refusing, Downright tells Brainworm to arrest him for... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 2
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...by the servant, has come to fight him. Bobadil explains that his gripe is with Downright; he complains that Downright “despoiled me of mine honour” and disarmed him of his sword.... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 3
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Downright, Brainworm, and Stephen enter. Old Knowell explains that Stephen is his nephew. Stephen says he... (full context)
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...that it was Roger Formal who told him to make the arrests. Clement asks why Downright accepted the arrest without seeing the warrant. Downright explains that Brainworm had told him he... (full context)
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Justice Clement mocks Downright for following Brainworm’s instructions, waving his sword over Brainworm, saying that he “must cut” him—but... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 5
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...will have to “fast it out” for being “so false.” He tells Stephen to give Downright his cloak back. (full context)
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...make their peace. Clement tells the rest to rid themselves of their “discontent. You, Master Downright, your anger; you, Master Knowell, your cares; Master Kitely, and his wife, their jealousy.” Clement... (full context)