Farewell to Manzanar

by

Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston

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Jeanne Character Analysis

The memoir’s writer and protagonist, a Japanese-American girl who is interned with her family at the Manzanar camp at age seven. Jeanne narrates the details of life at Manzanar in a simple and brisk style, underscoring her curious and unsentimental nature, as well as her extreme youth during the experience. Jeanne’s feelings of deep love for her family contrast with her increasing inability to depend on them as the crisis of internment distracts their attention and depletes their emotional strength. Over the course of the memoir, Jeanne comes of age, developing from an adventurous and inquisitive child to a driven student trying to find her niche in a postwar society still permeated by prejudice against Asian Americans. During her teenage years, Jeanne feels that the best way to fit in and feel “American” is to distance herself from her Japanese roots; it’s only at the end of high school, when she has achieved grudging acceptance from her peers, that Jeanne realizes fitting in isn’t enough to satisfy her. From then on, she starts to respect and explore her complex identity as a Japanese-Americans—a process that culminates in the writing of her memoir.

Jeanne Quotes in Farewell to Manzanar

The Farewell to Manzanar quotes below are all either spoken by Jeanne or refer to Jeanne. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Houghton Mifflin edition of Farewell to Manzanar published in 1973.
Chapter 2 Quotes

Mama took out another dinner plate and hurled it at the floor, then another and another, never moving, never opening her mouth, just quivering and glaring at the retreating dealer, with tears streaming down her cheeks.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Mama, Papa
Page Number: 13
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

[Mama] would quickly subordinate her own desires to those of the family or those of the community, because she knew cooperation was the only way to survive. At the same time she placed a premium on personal privacy, respected it in others and insisted upon it for herself. Almost everyone at Manzanar had inherited this pair of traits from the generations before them who had learned to live in a small, crowded country like Japan. Because of the first they were able to take a desolate stretch of wasteland and gradually make it livable. But the entire situation there, especially in the beginning … was an open insult to that other, private self, a slap in the face you were powerless to challenge.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Mama, Papa
Page Number: 30
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

My own family, after three years of mess hall living, collapsed as an integrated unit. Whatever dignity or feeling of filial strength we may have known before December 1941 was lost, and we did not recover it until many years after the war …

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Mama, Papa
Page Number: 33
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 6 Quotes

[Papa] didn’t die there, but things finished for him there, whereas for me it was like a birthplace. The camp was where our lifelines intersected.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Papa
Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:

But as badly as he wanted us to believe it, he never did finish law school. Who knows why? He was terribly proud, sometimes absurdly proud, and he refused to defer to any man. Maybe … he saw ahead of him prejudices he refused to swallow, humiliations he refused to bear.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Mama, Papa
Page Number: 49
Explanation and Analysis:

He was not a great man. He wasn’t even a very successful man. He was a poser, a braggart, and a tyrant. But he had held onto his self-respect, he dreamed grand dreams, and he could work well at any task he turned his hand to …

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Mama, Papa
Page Number: 52
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

There had always been doors to keep some moments private. Here there were no doors. Nothing was private. And tonight [Papa] was far too serious—he seemed to have reached some final limit.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Mama, Papa, Kiyo
Page Number: 63
Explanation and Analysis:

I was proud of Kiyo and afraid for what would happen to him; but deeper than that, I felt the miserable sense of loss that comes when the center has collapsed and everything seems to be flying apart around you.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Mama, Papa, Kiyo
Page Number: 64
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 9 Quotes

For a man raised in Japan, there was no greater disgrace. And it was the humiliation. It brought him face to face with his own vulnerability, his own powerlessness. He had no rights, no home, no control over his own life.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Papa
Page Number: 65
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 11 Quotes

It is a patriotic song that can also be read as a proverb, as a personal credo for endurance. The stone can be the kingdom or it can be a man’s life. The moss is the greenery that, in time, will spring even from a rock.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Papa
Related Symbols: Stones
Page Number: 81
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 12 Quotes

The fact that America had accused us, or excluded us, or imprisoned us, or whatever it might be called, did not change the kind of world we wanted. Most of us were born in this country; we had no other models. Those parks and gardens lent it an Asian character, but in most ways it was a totally equipped American small town …

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker)
Page Number: 89
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 13 Quotes

By that time I was desperate to be “accepted,” and baton twirling was one trick I could perform that was thoroughly, unmistakably American—putting on the boots and a dress crisscrossed with braid, spinning the silver stick and tossing it high to the tune of a John Philip Sousa march.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker)
Page Number: 97
Explanation and Analysis:

It was all a mystery … and this woman was so old, even her dialect was foreign to me. She seemed an occult figure, more spirit than human. When she bowed to me from her knees at the end of the hour, I rushed out of there, back to more familiar surroundings.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker)
Page Number: 98
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 16 Quotes

Three years of wartime propaganda—racist headlines, atrocity movies, hate slogans, and fright-mask posters—had turned the Japanese face into something despicable and grotesque. Mama and Papa knew this. They had been reading the papers. Even I knew this, although it was not until many years later that I realized how bad things actually were.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Mama, Papa
Page Number: 115
Explanation and Analysis:

The physical violence didn’t trouble me. Somehow I didn’t quite believe that, or didn’t want to believe such things could happen to us. It was the humiliation. That continuous, unnamed ache I had been living with was precise and definable now. Call it the foretaste of being hated … At ten I saw that coming, like a judge’s sentence, and I would have stayed inside the camp forever rather than step outside and face such a moment.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Mama, Papa
Related Symbols: Barbed Wire
Page Number: 115
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 19 Quotes

One of the amazing things about America is the way it can both undermine you and keep you believing in your own possibilities, pumping you with hope.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Papa
Page Number: 139
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 20 Quotes

I smiled and sat down, suddenly aware of what being of Japanese ancestry was going to be like. I wouldn’t be faced with physical attack, or with overt shows of hatred. Rather, I would be seen as someone foreign, or as someone other than American, or perhaps not be seen at all.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Radine
Page Number: 142
Explanation and Analysis:

I couldn’t understand why [Papa] was home all day, when Mama had to go out working. I was ashamed of him for that and, in a deeper way, for being what had led to our imprisonment, that is, for being so unalterably Japanese. I would not bring my friends home for fear of what he would say or do.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Mama, Papa
Page Number: 149
Explanation and Analysis:

He was unforgivably a foreigner then, foreign to them, foreign to me, foreign to everyone but Mama, who sat next to him smiling with pleased modesty. Twelve years old at the time, I wanted to scream. I wanted to slide out of sight under the table and dissolve.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Mama, Papa
Page Number: 151
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 21 Quotes

To this day I have a recurring dream, which fills me each time with a terrible sense of loss and desolation. I see a young, beautifully blond and blue-eyed high school girl moving through a room full of others her own age, much admired by everyone, men and women both, myself included, as I watch through a window.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker)
Page Number: 154
Explanation and Analysis:

I wanted the carnival to end so I could go somewhere private, climb out of my stuffy dress, and cool off. But all eyes were on me. It was too late now not to follow this make-believe carpet to its plywood finale, and I did not yet know of any truer destination.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker)
Page Number: 164
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 22 Quotes

These rock gardens had outlived the barracks and the towers and would surely outlive the asphalt road and rusted pipes and shattered slabs of concrete. Each stone was a mouth, speaking for a family, for some man who had beautified his doorstep.

Related Characters: Jeanne (speaker), Papa
Related Symbols: Stones, Barbed Wire
Page Number: 172
Explanation and Analysis:
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Jeanne Character Timeline in Farewell to Manzanar

The timeline below shows where the character Jeanne appears in Farewell to Manzanar. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: What is Pearl Harbor
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On the first weekend of December 1941, Jeanne Wakatsuki has just turned seven. She’s with her Mama and her sisters at the wharf... (full context)
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...together and share their nets. Standing at the harbor, Mama, Billy and Woody’s wives, and Jeanne wave goodbye. They don’t know exactly when the men will return, as the length of... (full context)
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Jeanne is used to seeing the boats disappear beyond the horizon, but this time they stop... (full context)
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...oil to Japanese submarines with his boat. The accusation makes Mama burst into tears and Jeanne hugs her legs, not understanding what’s going on. (full context)
Chapter 2: Shikata Ga Nai
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Over the years, the family has moved a lot due to Papa’s different jobs. Jeanne was born on a farm in Inglewood, but she grew up near the water in... (full context)
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When Jeanne was little, Papa often threatened to “sell [her] to the Chinaman” if she behaved badly.... (full context)
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...hardworking and proud to be considered “roughnecks”; they speak a slangy dialect of Japanese that Jeanne doesn’t understand, and because of this the other kids in her class despise her. Every... (full context)
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...uncertainty, as there are rumors going around about forcibly moving the entire Japanese population inland. Jeanne’s brothers constantly speculate on how to keep the family together if such a thing does... (full context)
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With Papa, the patriarch, gone, Jeanne’s brothers are anxious to take care of the family but not exactly sure how to... (full context)
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Mama and Woody go to work packing celery, while Jeanne and her siblings Kiyo and May go to school. Jeanne is confused and hurt that... (full context)
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...protection, away from the frontlines of naval operations. Proud to be wearing a new coat, Jeanne reports to a pickup point with her family and boards a Greyhound bus headed inland.... (full context)
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Jeanne is very excited about the trip, and she feels safe on the bus. Half the... (full context)
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By late afternoon, the bus reaches Manzanar. Jeanne sees a red, dusty landscape; dust swirls around the bus and pelts the windows. The... (full context)
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...the internees, as Japanese never eat rice with sweet foods. However, no one protests; when Jeanne opens her mouth Mama pokes her, warning her not to be impolite. (full context)
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In fact, the Wakatsukis are lucky to be living only with family members. Jeanne’s oldest sister and her husband live in a unit with strangers who constantly argue about... (full context)
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As the youngest child, Jeanne gets to sleep next to Mama. She’s happy about this and continues to sleep next... (full context)
Chapter 3: A Different Kind of Sand
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...their possessions are coated with dust that has floated inside. Even their eyebrows are gray. Jeanne and Kiyo find this funny, but Mama is scanning the surroundings with a mask-like face. (full context)
Chapter 4: A Common Master Plan
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That morning, Jeanne and her family wait half an hour in freezing wind to get breakfast. They bring... (full context)
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...form factories to turn old camps into usable clothes, but for now everyone makes do. Jeanne laughs when she sees Mama wearing old trousers much too big for her, but the... (full context)
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At the beginning, Jeanne is constantly plagued with stomach cramps and diarrhea, caused by typhoid vaccinations, spoiled food, and... (full context)
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The first time Jeanne and Mama visit the latrine on Block 16, they find it covered in excrement and... (full context)
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Eventually, the internees build partitions in the latrines, one by one. Mama and Jeanne’s sisters walk all the way across camp to use bathrooms with private toilets. Many women... (full context)
Chapter 5: Almost a Family
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Jeanne is too young to be humiliated by the camp as Mama is, but life at... (full context)
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...eating as a family. May has to bring food to Granny in the barracks, and Jeanne’s older siblings quickly start eating with their friends. Various family members trek across the camp... (full context)
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Although they have to stay near Mama, Jeanne and Kiyo eat with groups of other kids; they enjoy the independence. After a few... (full context)
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Jeanne says that after years of life at Manzanar, her family “collapsed as an integrated unit.”... (full context)
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After she’s released from Manzanar, Jeanne writes a paper for her middle-school journalism camps, describing a family tradition of night fishing... (full context)
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...with any special skills is asked to work, driven by “community spirit” or “outright patriotism.” Jeanne’s brothers work as carpenters, construction workers, and reservoir operations. Mama had been a dietician before... (full context)
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...twice a month, in which half the writing is censored; for the first time in Jeanne’s memory, he addresses his wife as “sweetheart.” Jeanne constantly craves her attention, grabbing her legs... (full context)
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Unable to depend on Mama, Jeanne seeks attention elsewhere, taking her “first steps” into the world outside her parents’ realm. She’s... (full context)
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Jeanne also gets to know Sister Mary Suzanne and Sister Mary Bernadette, two Japanese nuns who... (full context)
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With no school to attend and no real home, Jeanne begins to study catechism with the nuns. She’s attracted not just by the candy they... (full context)
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...a Greyhound bus. Everyone goes to meet him except Chizu, who has just given birth. Jeanne will never forget Papa’s cane, which emerges from the bus before he does. Father has... (full context)
Chapter 6: Whatever He Did Had Flourish
...He continues to use it even after his limp disappears—it becomes a dignifying accessory, and Jeanne calls it a “sad, homemade version” of the samurai swords his ancestors wielded in Japan.... (full context)
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...education and often brags that he attended law school, but he never actually finished university. Jeanne doesn’t know why he dropped out, but she surmises that because he was “absurdly proud”... (full context)
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...has to work as a migrant laborer while supporting Mama and eight children. Just before Jeanne is born, he becomes a fisherman, doing well enough to buy his two boats and... (full context)
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Jeanne acknowledges that even without internment, Papa could have lost his business or wrecked a boat—being... (full context)
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For Jeanne, the prewar years are represented by Papa and Mama’s silver anniversary celebration in 1940: Papa... (full context)
Chapter 7: Fort Lincoln: An Interview
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Jeanne takes on Papa’s perspective, imagining his intake interview at Fort Lincoln. Papa tells the officer... (full context)
Chapter 8: Inu
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Jeanne, who has just turned eight, explains Papa’s behavior by concluding that Papa thinks he is... (full context)
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...enough food to lying about where she had been. Mama falls on a mattress and Jeanne crawls under a bunk. If she were at home, she could go into another room... (full context)
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...“go ahead, if that will make you happy.” He stands over her, brandishing his cane. Jeanne has witnessed many angry scenes since Papa’s return, but tonight it seems more serious than... (full context)
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...punches Papa in the face. Papa’s nose starts bleeding, and Kiyo steps back in horror; Jeanne feels like he’s “bloodying the nose of God.” He expects to be punished, but Papa... (full context)
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...in the family.” Papa accepts the apology and Kiyo is reinstated in the barracks, but Jeanne feels that something has changed forever. Papa continues to drink and continues to abuse Mama,... (full context)
Chapter 9: The Mess Hall Bells
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Papa never speaks about his time in Fort Lincoln, and Jeanne believes that his silence is a result of his deep shame at being accused of... (full context)
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Jeanne says that the men’s festering bitterness finally erupts in what is now known as the... (full context)
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...not participate in the riot and makes the children stay inside for its duration, but Jeanne remembers the unnatural quiet that lasts throughout the preceding morning, and hearing crowds rush outside... (full context)
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All night after the riot, demonstrators keep the mess hall bells ringing, so Jeanne can’t sleep. She looks out the window and sees the searchlights sweeping over the camp.... (full context)
Chapter 10: The Reservoir Shack: An Aside
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In an aside, Jeanne takes on the perspective of her brother-in-law Kaz, the foreman of a reservoir crew and... (full context)
Chapter 11: Yes Yes No No
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...tree as an apology for all the hardship that lead up to the riot. For Jeanne, the holiday season is dispiriting—there are no good presents, the weather is terrible, and Papa... (full context)
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Jeanne is too young to understand the quandary; she only knows that men are constantly coming... (full context)
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During the meeting, Jeanne plays hopscotch with other girls in the windy yard. Walking home, hears men yelling inside... (full context)
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As Jeanne later finds out, when Papa speaks during the meeting people begin murmuring and calling him... (full context)
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A minute later, a sandstorm hits. The men drag Papa into the barracks and Jeanne follows him. He sits silently inside while Mama pours him tea, and Woody and Chizu... (full context)
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Later, Jeanne learns that Papa had grown up singing the national anthem every morning at school. Unlike... (full context)
Chapter 12: Manzanar, U.S.A.
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...that curves along a row of elm trees. A woman is walking down the path; Jeanne knows that this road leads towards the edge of the camp, but the barbed wire... (full context)
Chapter 13: Outings, Explorations
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After moving to Block 28 an establishing a better sense of order, Jeanne becomes happier and more tranquil in Manzanar. Moreover, she finally has a real school to... (full context)
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Jeanne sings in the elementary school glee club, learning folk songs that are popular throughout the... (full context)
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Jeanne’s favorite leader is Lois—like many Caucasians who volunteer at the camp, she’s a Quaker. She’s... (full context)
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Still, Jeanne reflects that if someone told her she was free to leave Manzanar, she would have... (full context)
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Instead of thinking about the outside, Jeanne focuses her energy on explorations within the camp, looking for “that special thing I could... (full context)
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Even at ten, Jeanne is much more drawn to “American” activities like baton twirling than traditional Japanese skills. She... (full context)
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Still, Jeanne is fascinated with the Japanese lifestyle the geisha embodies, and she explores it through two... (full context)
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Fed up with the geisha, Jeanne turns to ballet, which seems like a fun idea. She reports to an abandoned barracks... (full context)
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To be polite, Jeanne participates in the day’s class. But when the woman eventually takes off her ballet shoes... (full context)
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Jeanne’s most serious “exploration” is her flirtation with Catholicism. She resumes studying with the nuns Sister... (full context)
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A few days later, Jeanne announces to her parents that she’s going to be baptized and confirmed. Papa is immediately... (full context)
Chapter 14: In the Firebreak
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In retrospect, Jeanne is thankful that Papa prevented her from making such a serious religious decision at the... (full context)
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As the youngest child, Jeanne is used to receiving a lot of attention from her parents, but now she turns... (full context)
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...camp hospital, everyone is very worried—the hospital has very little blood plasma, and one of Jeanne’s sisters had to receive blood from Woody during labor, while her sister-in-law actually died from... (full context)
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On the second afternoon, Jeanne is walking through a firebreak to the hospital with Papa when they see Mama running... (full context)
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...Mama’s hands finger the yarn. Both of them continue to weep and talk quietly, as Jeanne watches. (full context)
Chapter 15: Departures
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...nineteen other young men. A photo of their departure later appears in the camp paper. Jeanne is almost as distraught as if Papa were leaving, since Woody has been such a... (full context)
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As Jeanne watches Woody depart, she stands between Mama and Chizu; because of this, she remembers the... (full context)
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...where they will be living, or what their citizenship status will be, when Woody returns. Jeanne says that when the answers to these questions become clear, the family only becomes more... (full context)
Chapter 16: Free to Go
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...property is surely occupied by others now. Moreover, Mama and Papa—and to a limited extent, Jeanne—know that throughout the war American society has been permeated by “racist headlines, atrocity movies, hate... (full context)
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Moreover, the Wakatsukis are now used to living only among other Japanese. Jeanne notes ironically that before the war, Japanese-Americans were often accused of being “clannish” and reluctant... (full context)
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...man is assaulted in Seattle, while a mob opens fire on a Fresno farmhouse. When Jeanne’s sister May leaves for the East Coast with her husband, armed guards escort her to... (full context)
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All this is very confusing to Jeanne, as she’s always imagined the world outside as “inaccessible yet wonderfully desirable”—she conjures the outside... (full context)
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Jeanne isn’t worried about physical violence—she can’t actually make herself believe that such things would happen.... (full context)
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Many of Jeanne’s older siblings are more restless at Manzanar than worried about racial hostility—they decide to relocate... (full context)
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...now that Papa is free to leave Manzanar he has no idea where to go. Jeanne compares his paralysis to that of black slaves at the end of the Civil War... (full context)
Chapter 17: It’s All Starting Over
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When Mama gets tired of arguing, she tells Jeanne to rub her back and release some of the tension. Since Jeanne isn’t strong enough... (full context)
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...must return to the outside world. Just as Pearl Harbor ended the prewar period of Jeanne’s life, this “appalling climax” is the end of her time at Manzanar. Internees are happy... (full context)
Chapter 18: Ka-ke, Near Hiroshima: April 1946
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Jeanne takes on the perspective of her brother, Woody, who is stationed in Japan with occupying... (full context)
Chapter 19: Re-Entry
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Jeanne and Mama go in the first trip; Papa is driving frantically and becomes outraged every... (full context)
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...some sign of hostility towards Japanese-Americans, something to match the stories they’ve heard. Even though Jeanne doesn’t understand exactly what’s going on, she’s heard so many people talking about hatred that... (full context)
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...Service helps the family find an apartment in a Long Beach government housing project. For Jeanne, it’s exciting to live somewhere with its own stove and flushing toilet; not until years... (full context)
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Papa never quite recovers from this blow, but he doesn’t give up either. For Jeanne, this demonstrates the way that America “can both undermine you and keep you believing in... (full context)
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Jeanne gradually begins to lose her sense of dread and fear. She’s soothed by listening to... (full context)
Chapter 20: A Double Impulse
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On Jeanne’s first day of sixth grade, her kindly teacher asks her to read a page aloud.... (full context)
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In her years at Manzanar, although Jeanne knew her family hadn’t done anything wrong, she never truly questioned why the government put... (full context)
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From that day on, Jeanne frequently wants to be invisible. She feels that if people notice her, they will only... (full context)
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However, another part of Jeanne wants to “prove” that she belongs in America, just as Woody proved his patriotism by... (full context)
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Soon, Jeanne learns that she’s accepted in certain areas of school life—she’s expected to be a good... (full context)
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Jeanne excels at school and extracurriculars, but she’s still not satisfied and doesn’t feel that she... (full context)
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Jeanne doesn’t truly blame Radine—she’s used to people’s parents being suspicious of her. As if in... (full context)
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Jeanne teaches Radine to baton twirl, which bring the two girls even closer together. Practicing every... (full context)
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Jeanne explains that for her, it’s easier to gain acceptance from men’s organizations than women’s. Like... (full context)
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Jeanne’s brothers are proud of her new role in the parades, but Papa is not; he... (full context)
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However, Jeanne’s feeling influenced less and less by her family; she doesn’t like being in the crowded... (full context)
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...it also seems like he’s “shrinking” in comparison. Papa starts drinking again, a development which Jeanne witnesses in “sorrow and disgust.” She channels her shame at the family’s poverty, their strained... (full context)
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Papa refuses to come to the parades when Jeanne marches, but she’s even more upset when he does show up to events. One night... (full context)
Chapter  21: The Girl of My Dreams
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Jeanne says that she can trace her path over the next few years by her shifting... (full context)
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...majority white high school, everything changes. Radine is asked to join high school sororities, while Jeanne is excluded. Boys flirt with Jeanne but ask Radine to dances. In the school band,... (full context)
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Jeanne isn’t discouraged by discriminatory treatment but rather by witnessing the social acceptance Radine achieves so... (full context)
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Jeanne doesn’t want to change herself or her heritage. She just craves the acceptance that Radine... (full context)
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Jeanne loses interest in school and starts cutting class and hanging out in the streets. She... (full context)
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As a senior in high school, Jeanne starts over in San Jose; despite the stigma of her race, she has a certain... (full context)
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The next day, while the ballots are being counted, Jeanne’s friend Leonard Rodriguez runs up to her and says that he caught the teachers trying... (full context)
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Jeanne affects nonchalance and pretends not to care about the outcome, reluctant to admit how much... (full context)
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That night, Jeanne has to admit to Papa that she has won the carnival queen contest. When she... (full context)
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Furiously, Papa demands that Jeanne sign up for Japanese deportment classes at a nearby Buddhist church. He says he’ll allow... (full context)
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Papa never mentions the carnival queen contest again, but Jeanne can sense he’s reluctantly proud of her independence and ability to stand up for herself.... (full context)
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Under Mama’s influence, Jeanne decides on an elegant but modest ball gown—unlike the other girls in the ceremony, who... (full context)
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...like a church, with a plywood throne and a carpet made out of bed sheets. Jeanne waits in the locker room with her four attendants. One of them is Lois Carson,... (full context)
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Jeanne walks onto the carpet of sheets, feeling like a bride. There’s a polite round of... (full context)
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Jeanne reaches the throne and looks back at her attendants. She knows that after the ceremony... (full context)
Chapter 22: Ten Thousand Voices
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Jeanne says that as she comes to comprehend the enormity of internment, she becomes deeply ashamed... (full context)
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Jeanne is the first person in her family to finish college, and to marry a non-Japanese... (full context)
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Jeanne compares the family’s inability to discuss internment to an episode she and Kiyo underwent. Waiting... (full context)
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In 1972, thirty years after she first arrived there, Jeanne and her husband take their three children on a road trip to Manzanar. The highway... (full context)
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...graveyard, and some elms planted by internees remain. Standing in the wind among the ruins, Jeanne thinks of Mama, who has been dead for seven years. She believes in ghosts, and... (full context)
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Jeanne walks through the camp with her husband, identifying the foundations of different buildings. In some... (full context)
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Jeanne comes across the remains of a park, but it soon fades into desolate weeds. At... (full context)
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Jeanne and her husband look for the remnants of Block 28. Soon, they smell the few... (full context)
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Jeanne’s husband walks the kids back to the car, and Jeanne watches her eleven-year-old daughter walk... (full context)
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This visit has helped Jeanne finally jettison the shame and guilt that she’s always associated with internment. These days, she... (full context)
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Jeanne slowly walks back to the car, finding another collection of stones on the way. It... (full context)
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Jeanne imagines an episode right before the family’s departure from Manzanar, which she now realizes is... (full context)
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Late in the afternoon, Mama, Jeanne, Chizu, and May see Papa proudly returning with the new sedan. He smells like whiskey;... (full context)
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...plunging through a firebreak. By this time, the women have stopped shouting. From this angle, Jeanne can’t see the barbed wire fence; she knows she should be afraid, as she normally... (full context)