Fast Food Nation

Walt Disney Character Analysis

The founder of the Walt Disney Company, famous for its animated films and its theme parks. Walt Disney was, like Ray Kroc, a corporate visionary who saw the enormous profits company’s might be able to reap when they marketed their products to children. Like Kroc, too, Disney was a strong anti-union campaigner, although Disney was an even more stridently conservative than Kroc, who still expressed sympathies for some liberal (though non-union) causes.
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Walt Disney Character Timeline in Fast Food Nation

The timeline below shows where the character Walt Disney appears in Fast Food Nation. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2: Your Trusted Friends
Greed, Corporations, and “The Bottom Line” Theme Icon
Independence vs. the Social Contract Theme Icon
Bureaucracy and Complex Systems Theme Icon
...notes that the tone of the McDonald’s museum, and indeed its entire corporate complex, is “Disneyesque,” and he argues that this is not a coincidence, since Kroc—the man who took the... (full context)
Greed, Corporations, and “The Bottom Line” Theme Icon
Independence vs. the Social Contract Theme Icon
Bureaucracy and Complex Systems Theme Icon
Work and “The Good Life” Theme Icon
Both Kroc and Disney were self-educated, and their training facilities they christened “universities,” to make employees at Disney and... (full context)
Greed, Corporations, and “The Bottom Line” Theme Icon
Independence vs. the Social Contract Theme Icon
Bureaucracy and Complex Systems Theme Icon
Work and “The Good Life” Theme Icon
Schlosser notes that, after purchasing McDonald’s franchising rights, Kroc sent a letter to Disney, then already quite famous as head of the Disney movie studio, to ask to sell... (full context)
Greed, Corporations, and “The Bottom Line” Theme Icon
Independence vs. the Social Contract Theme Icon
Bureaucracy and Complex Systems Theme Icon
Work and “The Good Life” Theme Icon
Schlosser explains Disney’s methods for making cartoons during the 1930s and ‘40s: for Disney, his studio was “a... (full context)
Greed, Corporations, and “The Bottom Line” Theme Icon
Independence vs. the Social Contract Theme Icon
Bureaucracy and Complex Systems Theme Icon
Work and “The Good Life” Theme Icon
Disney, as Schlosser notes, was a strong supporter of Republican causes. Ronald Reagan, a former movie... (full context)
Greed, Corporations, and “The Bottom Line” Theme Icon
Independence vs. the Social Contract Theme Icon
Bureaucracy and Complex Systems Theme Icon
Work and “The Good Life” Theme Icon
Disney was also greatly enamored with “progress,” not unlike Carl Karcher, the founder of Carl’s Jr.... (full context)
Greed, Corporations, and “The Bottom Line” Theme Icon
Independence vs. the Social Contract Theme Icon
Bureaucracy and Complex Systems Theme Icon
Schlosser writes that corporate synergy reached a new zenith in 1996, when McDonald’s and Disney signed a ten-year agreement for cross-promotion of products between the companies—especially the marketing of Disney... (full context)