Feed

Feed

by

M. T. Anderson

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Feed: Part 2: Salad Days, with Sneeze Guard Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
The next morning, the friends entertain themselves by blowing needles at a “skinless anatomy man on the wall.” The game is fun, and the day ends up being one of the best of Titus’s life. Everyone hits on Violet, but Violet only pays attention to Titus.
Without their feeds, the friends are forced to find ways to entertain themselves—disturbingly violent ways, by many standards, but at least they’re exercising some creativity.
Themes
Apathy, Happiness, and Satisfaction Theme Icon
Loga visits the hospital, but has to stop talking to her friends because her favorite feedcast is on. Everybody wants to know what’s happening in the feedcast. She explains that the characters are saying that they love each other, in the moonlight. Quendy is so moved she weeps.
Quendy’s crying suggests that feed entertainment, it’s implied, is so cheesy that it trains its consumers to think in terms of the most clichéd emotions.
Themes
Corporations and Consumerism Theme Icon
Apathy, Happiness, and Satisfaction Theme Icon
Violet and Titus sit together, talking about old music they liked as kids. Violet says, to her own surprise, “This is fun” and suggests, “Maybe these are our salad days.” Titus replies, “What’s happy about a salad?” “Ranch,” Violet replies.
“Salad days” is an idiom (from Shakespeare!) meaning a period of youthful exuberance and innocence. Violet clearly knows what the idiom means, but she’s willing to play along with Titus, who doesn’t. Even if Violet seems smarter and more mature than Titus, they’re attracted to each other’s creativity and uncommon decency.
Themes
Corporations and Consumerism Theme Icon
Apathy, Happiness, and Satisfaction Theme Icon
Resistance Theme Icon