Fight Club

Fight Club Chapter 27 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
The Narrator wakes up in the ruins of his old condo. He “checks,” and finds that he still has his testicles. He peers out of the edges of the ruined condo and sees the ground, stories below him. He contemplates jumping, but then remembers Marla, and decides that she’s worth living for—he has to protect her.
The Narrator survived the last chapter with his testicles intact: it seems that the space monkeys have freed him, though Palahniuk never fully explains why. Possibly, the space monkeys free the Narrator because of their respect for Tyler, who, in their minds, is the same person as the Narrator (that’s why a man shouts, “Don't hurt him!” at the end of the last chapter). Here, The Narrator contemplates suicide; guilty and afraid of what he’s done as Tyler, he considers killing himself. In doing so, the Narrator would arguably be “sacrificing” himself, as Tyler has been talking about throughout the novel—thus, he would still be doing Tyler’s bidding in a way.
Themes
Consumerism, Perfection, and Modernity Theme Icon
Masculinity in Modern Society Theme Icon
Death, Pain, and the “Real” Theme Icon
Rebellion and Sacrifice Theme Icon
The Narrator goes downstairs, and the doorman greets him, calling him, “Sir.” The Narrator calls Marla and tells her to meet him in the place where they first met—he warns her that her life might be in danger. Reluctantly, Marla agrees.
Strangely, the Narrator continues to command the admiration of the space monkeys (even after they turned against him in the last scene). This suggests that the group isn’t as well organized as it might seem—many of its members don’t know that “Tyler” has turned against them.
Themes
Consumerism, Perfection, and Modernity Theme Icon
Masculinity in Modern Society Theme Icon
Death, Pain, and the “Real” Theme Icon
Shortly afterwards, the Narrator is standing with Marla in the basement of the First Methodist church, where they first ran into each other in the testicular cancer support group. There’s another testicular cancer support group going on, but Marla yells at the Narrator, “You killed someone! I called the police.” She tells The Narrator that she saw him shoot a man at a hotel. The Narrator is horrified, but tells Marla that it was Tyler who committed such a crime. Marla adds, “And you don’t have cancer, either!” Suddenly, everyone in the cancer support group looks at the Narrator, horribly offended.
The style becomes increasingly disjointed as the novel reaches an end. The Narrator’s moments of dissociation grow more pronounced—he’s still “becoming” Tyler, but now he’s conscious of his own divided personality. Evidently, the Narrator (as Tyler) killed a man during his most recent dissociative episode. The passage is darkly hilarious: it’s the fact that the Narrator is pretending to have cancer (not the fact that he murdered someone) that turns people’s heads, as if lying about your own manner of death is worse than causing actual death.
Themes
Consumerism, Perfection, and Modernity Theme Icon
Masculinity in Modern Society Theme Icon
Death, Pain, and the “Real” Theme Icon
Repression and the Unconscious Mind Theme Icon
The Narrator tries to tell Marla the truth: he’s afraid Project Mayhem might try to hurt Marla. Marla is suspicious, and asks why the Narrator is telling her this—the Narrator explains, “Because I think I like you.” The Narrator leaves the building, thinking, “I have to take care of Tyler Durden.”
The Narrator believes that he has to deal with Tyler Durden once and for all, but he doesn’t reveal how he intends to do so. The Narrator’s impetus for “taking care” of Tyler is his affection for Marla, though he’s careful not to use the word “love.”
Themes
Consumerism, Perfection, and Modernity Theme Icon
Masculinity in Modern Society Theme Icon
Death, Pain, and the “Real” Theme Icon
Repression and the Unconscious Mind Theme Icon
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