Half Broke Horses

by

Jeannette Walls

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Lily Casey Smith Character Analysis

The protagonist and narrator of the story, Lily Casey Smith grows up in the rural West over the first half of the twentieth century. Fiercely independent and resourceful, Lily’s no-nonsense attitude allows her to thrive even in the face of natural disaster, personal tragedy, and reductive attitudes toward women. Lily respects people who do not complain about their lot in life, and is extremely hardworking. Raised by a carriage horse trainer, she feels a strong connection to horses and begins “breaking” them—or making them submissive—at age six. She also loves school and excels academically, but is forced to drop out when Dad uses her tuition money to buy Great Danes. Not content with waiting around for a man to propose to her on the family ranch, at age fifteen Lily makes a 500-mile journey across the desert to reach Red Lake, where she gets her first job as a teacher in a one-room schoolhouse. She loves teaching because it is one place where she can be her own boss, and she finds the work of educating impoverished children—especially girls—deeply fulfilling. When she loses her job due to the return of many certified teachers at the end of World War I, she takes a train by herself to Chicago. She lives in the city for eight years, during which time she works as a maid and attends rallies for women’s suffrage with her friend and roommate Minnie Hagan. She also has a brief, doomed marriage to the two-timing Ted Conover. Upon discovering that he has another wife, Lily annuls the marriage but also asserts her strength by telling Ted that he could never “destroy” her. Indeed, Lily reveals her strength of character repeatedly throughout the story by refusing to bow to restrictive gender roles or arbitrary societal rules with which she disagrees. Upon deciding she wants children, she approaches Jim Smith about marriage, and insists that their union be an equal partnership. She proves invaluable to keeping their family afloat during the Great Depression and while running a 180,000-acre ranch. When the family moves to Phoenix, Lily quickly grows weary of the bureaucracy that accompanies teaching and living in the city. Like Jim and her children, Rosemary and Little Jim, Lily is most at peace when living in harmony with the natural world. Even so, she embraces modern technology’s ability to improve work at the ranch and to bolster her own sense of independence. Much as she enjoys riding horses, she grows to love driving cars and, above all, flying airplanes—to Lily, the ultimate symbol of progress and personal freedom.

Lily Casey Smith Quotes in Half Broke Horses

The Half Broke Horses quotes below are all either spoken by Lily Casey Smith or refer to Lily Casey Smith. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Women’s Strength in a Man’s World Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Scribner edition of Half Broke Horses published in 2010.
Chapter 1  Quotes

The windmill still lay toppled over the caved-in house, and the yard was strewn with branches. Dad was always going on about the easterners who came out to west Texas but weren't tough enough to cut it, and now we were folding our hand as well. Sometimes it didn't matter how much gumption you had. What mattered were the cards you'd been dealt.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker)
Page Number: 28
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 2  Quotes

Most of the other girls came from rich ranch families. Whereas I was used to hollering like a horse trainer, they had whispery voices and ladylike manners and matching luggage. Some of the girls complained about the gray uniforms we had to wear, but I liked the way they leveled out the differences between those who could afford fancy store-bought clothes and those of us, like me, who had only home-dyed beechnut brown dresses. I did make friends, however, trying to follow Dad’s advice to figure out what someone wanted and help her get it, though it was hard, when you saw someone doing something wrong, to resist the temptation to correct her. Especially if that someone acted hoity-toity.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker), Dad / Adam Casey
Page Number: 38-39
Explanation and Analysis:

Mom and Dad always talked as if it was a matter of course that Helen and I would marry and Buster would inherit the property, though I had to admit I'd never actually met a boy I liked, not to mention felt like marrying. On the other hand, women who didn't marry became old maids, spinsters who slept in the attic, sat in a corner peeling potatoes all day, and were a burden on their families, like our neighbor Old Man Pucket’s sister, Louella.

Page Number: 39
Explanation and Analysis:

The problem with half-broke horses like these was that no one took the time to train them. Cowboys who could ride anything caught them and ran them on fear, spurring and quirting them too hard, taking pride in staying on no matter how desperately they bucked and fishtailed. Not properly broken, they were always scared and hated humans. A lot of times the cowboys released them once the roundup was over, but by then they'd lost some of the instincts that kept them alive out in the desert. They were, however, intelligent and had pluck, and if you broke them right, they made good horses.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker)
Related Symbols: Half Broke Horses
Page Number: 49
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 3  Quotes

I'd been on the road, out in the sun and sleeping in the open, for twenty-eight days. I was tired and caked with dirt. I'd lost weight, my clothes were heavy with grime and hung loosely, and when I looked in a mirror, my face seemed harder. My skin had darkened, and I had the beginnings of squint lines around my eyes. But I had made it, made it through that darned door.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker), Mother Albertina, Patches
Page Number: 61
Explanation and Analysis:

I couldn't help feeling a little burned about being told by Fish Face that I was now unqualified to do something I'd spent the last four years doing.

Superintendent Maclntosh seemed to know what I was thinking. "You're young and strong, and you got pretty eyes," he said. "You just find yourself a husband—one of these soldier boys—and you'll be fine."

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker), Mr. MacIntosh (speaker)
Page Number: 69
Explanation and Analysis:

As I listened to Dad, I could feel myself pulling away from him. All my life I'd been hearing Dad reminiscing about the past and railing against the future. I decided not to tell him about the red airplane. It would only get him more worked up. What Dad didn't understand was that no matter how much he hated or feared the future, it was coming, and there was only one way to deal with it: by climbing aboard.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker), Dad / Adam Casey
Related Symbols: The Red Airplane
Page Number: 68
Explanation and Analysis:

But no matter how much planning you do, one tiny miscalculation, one moment of distraction, can end it all in an instant. There was a lot of danger in this world, and you had to be smart about it. You had to do what you could to prevent disaster. That night at the boardinghouse, I got out a pair of scissors and a mirror, and although Mom always called my long brown hair my crowning glory, I cut it all off just below my ears.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker), Mom / Daisy Mae Peacock, Minnie Hanagan
Page Number: 73
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

I discovered that I loved cars even more than I loved horses. Cars didn't need to be fed if they weren't working, and they didn’t leave big piles of manure all over the place. Cars were faster than horses, and they didn't run off or kick down fences. They also didn't buck, bite, or rear, and they didn't need to be broke and trained, or caught and saddled up every time you needed to go somewhere. They didn't have a mind of their own. Cars obeyed you.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker), Jim Smith
Page Number: 98
Explanation and Analysis:

The parents of my schoolkids included cattle rustlers, drunks, land speculators, bootleggers, gamblers, and former prostitutes. They didn't mind me racing horses, playing poker, or drinking contraband whiskey, but my showing some compassion to a sister who'd been taken advantage of and then abandoned by a smooth-talking scoundrel filled them with moral indignation. It made me want to throttle them all.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker), Helen, Mr. MacIntosh
Page Number: 107
Explanation and Analysis:

She was convinced that Mom in particular would never forgive her for bringing shame on the family. Mom and Dad would disown her, she believed, the same way our servant girl Lupe's parents had kicked her out when she got pregnant. No man would ever want her again, Helen said, she had no place to go. She wasn't as strong as me, she said, and couldn't make it on her own.

"Don't you ever feel like giving up?" Helen asked. "I just feel like giving up."

"That's nonsense," I said. "You're much stronger than you think. There's always a way out." I talked again about the cottonwood tree. I also told her about the time I was sent home from the Sisters of Loretto because Dad wouldn't pay my tuition, and how Mother Albertina had told me that when God closes a window, he opens a door, and it was up to us to find it.

Page Number: 108
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

I realized that in the months since Helen had died, I hadn't been paying much attention to things like the sunrise, but that old sun had been coming up anyway. It didn't really care how I felt, it was going to rise and set regardless of whether I noticed it, and if I was going to enjoy it, that was up to me.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker)
Page Number: 113
Explanation and Analysis:

A distinctly malodorous aroma arose from the hole, and for a moment I missed my snazzy mail-order toilet with the shiny white porcelain bowl, the mahogany lid, and the nifty pull-chain flush. As I sat down, though, I realized that you can get so used to certain luxuries that you start to think they're necessities, but when you have to forgo them, you come to see that you don't need them after all. There was a big difference between needing things and wanting things—though a lot of people had trouble telling the two apart—and at the ranch, I could see, we'd have pretty much everything we'd need but precious little else.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker)
Page Number: 133
Explanation and Analysis:

"Just you remember," I said, "that this is what could happen when an animal gets freedom. Animals act like they hate to be penned up, but the fact is, they don't know what to do with freedom. And a lot of times it kills them."

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker), Rosemary
Page Number: 142
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 6 Quotes

That, I came to see, was the heart of the matter. You were free to choose enslavement, but the choice was a free one only if you knew what your alternatives were. I began to think of it as my job to make sure the girls I was teaching learned that it was a big world out there and there were other things they could do besides being brood-mares dressed in feed sacks.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker)
Page Number: 165
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

But the Jesuits were used to dealing with untamed ranch boys, and they regarded Little Jim as one more rambunctious rapscallion. Rosemary's teachers, however, saw her as a misfit. Most of the girls at the academy were demure, frail things, but Rosemary played with her pocketknife, yodeled in the choir, peed in the yard, and caught scorpions in a jar she kept under her bed. She loved to leap down the school's main staircase and once took it in two bounds only to come crashing into the Mother Superior. She was behaving more or less the way she did on the ranch, but what seemed normal in one situation can seem outright peculiar in another, and the nuns saw Rosemary as a wild child.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker), Rosemary, Little Jim
Related Symbols: Half Broke Horses
Page Number: 192
Explanation and Analysis:

Dad's death didn't hollow me out the way Helen's had. After all, everyone had assumed Dad was a goner back when he got kicked in the head as a child. Instead, he had cheated death and, despite his gimp and speech impediment, lived a long life doing pretty much what he wanted. He hadn't drawn the best of cards, but he’d played his hand darned well, so what was there to grieve over?

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker), Dad / Adam Casey, Helen
Page Number: 199
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

Cars were supposed to mean freedom, but all these people stuck in traffic on one way streets—where you weren't even allowed to make a U-turn to get the hell out of the jam—might as well have been sitting in cages. … Nothing had ever made me feel as free as flying and I was only a few hours away from getting my pilot’s license so I decided to take up lessons again. The airport had a flying school, but when I showed up one day, the clerk passed me an entire sheaf of forms and started yammering about eye exams physicals, takeoff slots, elevation restrictions and no-fly zones. I realized that these city folks had boxed off and chopped up the sky the same way they had the ground.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Red Airplane
Page Number: 224
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 9 Quotes

I felt there was a lot more I could say about the subject of danger. I could have given her an entire lecture on it, talking about my dad getting his head staved in by a horse when he was three, about my Chicago friend Minnie getting killed when her hair got caught in machinery, about my sister, Helen, taking her own life after accidentally getting pregnant. Life came with as much adventure and danger as any one body needed. You didn't have to go chasing after them. But the fact of the matter was, Rosemary hadn't really listened to what I had to say ever since that time we visited the Havasupai and I gave her the whipping for swimming with Fidel Hanna.

Page Number: 257
Explanation and Analysis:

I shook my head and looked at the lilies. "I could cut you all the slack in the world, but I still think my daughter needs an anchor."

"The problem with being attached to an anchor," he said, "is it's damned hard to fly."

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker), Rex Walls (speaker), Rosemary
Page Number: 258
Explanation and Analysis:

As Rosemary climbed into the car, Rex patted her behind like he owned it, then got in beside her. They were both still laughing as Rex gunned the motor the way he always did.

Jim put his arm around me and we watched them take off up the street, heading out into open country like a couple of half-broke horses.

Related Characters: Lily Casey Smith (speaker), Jim Smith, Rosemary, Rex Walls
Related Symbols: Half Broke Horses
Page Number: 265
Explanation and Analysis:
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Lily Casey Smith Character Timeline in Half Broke Horses

The timeline below shows where the character Lily Casey Smith appears in Half Broke Horses. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1 
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As Lily, her younger brother Buster, and their younger sister Helen try to bring the family cows... (full context)
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...what saved them. She demands that they thank both her and their guardian angel. After Lily tells her father how she saved her siblings, he tells her that maybe she was... (full context)
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Lily notes that she was born in 1901, shortly after Dad got out of prison for... (full context)
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Lily and her family, like many in the area, live in a simple dugout in the... (full context)
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...who was thrown out of her own home after having a child out of wedlock. Lily likes Lupe because she never feels sorry for herself. (full context)
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...his share and is caught up in lawsuits against his elder brother over the herd. Lily notes that her father has a serious temper, in part due to his frustration with... (full context)
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Salt draw is home to frequent dangerous flash flooding. When Lily was eight, a flood poured into the dugout. Mom refused to help them bail the... (full context)
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Despite the way his speech makes him sound, Lily asserts that Dad is smart and well-read. He is a prolific writer, frequently focused on... (full context)
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...features and constitution. She dotes on Buster as the future of the family, and who Lily notes is “one of the fastest and smoothest talkers in the country.” Mom is not... (full context)
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Lily reflects on helping Dad train the horses from the time she turned five. Dad tells... (full context)
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Lily says she was in charge of breaking the horses, a job made easier by the... (full context)
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Lily also feeds chickens and collects eggs. Once a week she goes to the nearest town... (full context)
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Lily notes that tornados are frequent in Salt Draw, and that the inhabitants fear them even... (full context)
Chapter 2 
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...which Dad likes to call the “KC ranch,” where the countryside is so green that Lily can hardly believe her eyes. The ranch is farm-like, with tomato vines and peach orchards.... (full context)
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Despite being only eleven, Lily oversees the hiring of farmhands for her father. Dad is distracted by training horses, and... (full context)
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That fall Lily turns twelve and Buster enrolls in a Jesuit school, despite being two years younger than... (full context)
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Compared to the ranch, school feels like a vacation to Lily, and she excels academically. She begins to tutor other students and notes the differences between... (full context)
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One day Mother Albertina calls Lily into her study and tells her that while many girls are at the school to... (full context)
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Mother Albertina sees a tearful Lily to the train station and assures her that when God closes a window he opens... (full context)
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...tenant farmer Zachary Clemens, his wife, and daughter, Dorothy, to help out on the ranch. Lily admires Dorothy’s work ethic. One day Dorothy finds all four dogs shot dead by neighboring... (full context)
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Dad decides to file a legal claim against Old Man Pucket instead and appoints Lily to speak for him in court. Lily is well-prepared to make a presentation, but the... (full context)
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...them and they will be very difficult to ride due to their fear of humans. Lily takes to a mare who seems less skittish than the rest, saying that though she... (full context)
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...to continue to high school, having already achieved a higher education than most out West. Lily notices that he and Dorothy like each other and observes that he would need someone... (full context)
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Lily receives a letter from Mother Albertina. With World War I starting there is a shortage... (full context)
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Lily rides Patches to Red Lake, packing light and planning to stop at towns along the... (full context)
Chapter 3 
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As Lily travels, the road is hot and largely empty, apart from occasional cowboys or “wagonfulls of... (full context)
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After passing Indian Reservations, Lily falls into a rhythm with Priscilla Loosefoot, a Navajo woman not much older than Lily... (full context)
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After twenty-eight days, Lily arrives in Red Lake. She notes that she is filthy and has lost weight, and... (full context)
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Shortly after Lily’s arrival, she meets the county superintendent, Mr. MacIntosh. He explains that the board wants certified... (full context)
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...MacIntosh finds a certified teacher for Red Lake. For the next three years after that, Lily moves between small towns in the same county as a teacher. Despite her nomadic and... (full context)
During the ride back to the ranch, Lily sees a red airplane, her first ever. She excitedly gallops after it and, upon realizing... (full context)
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Having seen the airplane and cars in Arizona, Lily has doubts about the future of the carriage horse business. Lily no longer wants the... (full context)
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The trip to Chicago takes only four days, whereas Lily’s trip with Patches took a month to go half that distance. Lily gawks at the... (full context)
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Lily resigns herself to becoming a maid, and quickly finds work with a commodities trader and... (full context)
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Lily loves the hustle and bustle of Chicago and grows close with her roommate, a spunky... (full context)
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Lily’s new haircut makes her feel modern and flapper-like, and attracts the attention of Ted Conover,... (full context)
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Ted is often away for work, but Lily does not mind because she is so busy with her own job and school. She... (full context)
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At the hospital Lily calls Ted’s office, introducing herself as his wife and asking how to reach him on... (full context)
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The next morning, Lily finds that Ted has nearly drained their joint bank account. She packs her gun in... (full context)
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Lily is angry but knows she will survive. She reflects again on the inability to predict... (full context)
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Lily applies to the Arizona state teachers’ college in Flagstaff and works multiple jobs while waiting... (full context)
Chapter 4
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Lily loves college and feels more focused than her younger classmates, but worries about paying the... (full context)
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Lily is strict with her students, reflecting that, like horses, it is easier to gain their... (full context)
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Word spreads about Lily breaking the mustang, and her help with horses becomes sought after in Red Lake. Rooster... (full context)
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Lily buys a red silk shirt to wear at the horse races so spectators can recognize... (full context)
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Jim teaches Lily to drive on a Ford Model T. Lily realizes she loves cars even more than... (full context)
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It soon becomes clear that Jim is courting Lily, and though she is not interested in marriage, she admires his work ethic and lack... (full context)
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Helen has been writing to Lily about her life in Hollywood and the series of men she has been seeing. One... (full context)
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Lily is shocked at how frail and jittery Helen appears upon her arrival at Red Lake.... (full context)
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Lily tries to assure Helen that they will find a way to survive. She insists their... (full context)
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The next day Lily plans to take Helen to the Grand Canyon to put their problems in perspective. Lily... (full context)
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Father Cavanaugh refuses to let Lily bury Helen in the Catholic cemetery because suicide is a sin. Lily, Jim, and Rooster... (full context)
Chapter 5
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Lily feels overwhelmed by grief following Helen’s death, and resents Red Lake for not affording her... (full context)
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Jim and Lily marry in the classroom once school is out for the summer, with Rooster as Jim’s... (full context)
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When Lily is eight and a half months pregnant, Jim insists she stays home. She quickly gets... (full context)
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Two weeks later, Lily gives birth with the help of local midwife Granny Combs, who uses a “mind-over-matter” method... (full context)
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...limit.” The garage loses business as people can no longer afford to buy gas, and Lily fears they will go into bankruptcy. One day Mr. Lee, a local Chinese man who... (full context)
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...with two women sitting inside and asks to buy alcohol. Sensing he is already drunk, Lily refuses, causing him to become angry and call her “the sister of a whore who’d... (full context)
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Lily and Jim decide to auction off their belongings and look for work in California. Before... (full context)
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...garage filled with twenty-six different vehicles, ranging from covered wagons to a Chevy pickup truck. Lily knows she and Jim will have to play every role on the ranch, but that... (full context)
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...The family tours the land for ten days but finds no natural source of water. Lily suggests renting a bulldozer to build a dam, and writes up calculations about how much... (full context)
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...buy cattle for cheap and hire twelve cowboys to drive the cattle to the ranch. Lily tries to keep Rosemary away from them. Rosemary is like a “half-broke” horse herself, Lily... (full context)
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To manage her workload at the ranch, Lily says she will not do any unnecessary cleaning, or “maids work.” This includes washing clothes,... (full context)
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Lily senses a growing tension between herself and Rosemary, who has become more rambunctious after spending... (full context)
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That winter Lily and Jim buy a long-range radio, along with two giant batteries, since they still don’t... (full context)
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Over the next year, a serious drought occurs and Lily and Jim save the ranch by hauling drums of water from another town. When the... (full context)
Chapter 6
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...to buy the neighboring Hackberry ranch, which has a windmill with well water. He and Lily now preside over 180,000 acres of land. Lily loves Hackberry, and believes its well means... (full context)
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Lily is now nearing her thirty-ninth birthday. When the family drives by a sign for flying... (full context)
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Still needing more income, Lily writes to Grady Gammage, who helped her get her job in Red Lake, about teaching... (full context)
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Lily observes that the students’ houses are like “breeding factories” where up to seven wives “churn... (full context)
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The local patriarch, Uncle Eli, scolds Lily for teaching the girls “worldly ways,” and says the town will shun her if she... (full context)
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Lily gets another job in Peach Springs, where she agrees to be the teacher, janitor, cook,... (full context)
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Lily decides to use the hearse to run a taxi business on weekends and puts some... (full context)
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Lily decides to show the children what Christmas is like, and tries to convince them that... (full context)
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Deputy Johnson’s son Johnny Johnson is in Lily’s class, and a real trouble maker. He kisses Rosemary and sticks his hand up another... (full context)
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Lily is determined to prove to the town that Deputy Johnson did not break her spirit.... (full context)
Chapter 7
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...while playing outside, but their parents tell them to “tough it out.” One day while Lily is driving with Rosemary, the hearse gets stuck in the mud. Lily spots a group... (full context)
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Sensing the kids need more “civilizing,” Lily and Jim send both to boarding schools. Lily vows to finish her degree and join... (full context)
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...she and Little Jim are ecstatic to return to life on the ranch. By then, Lily has earned her college degree. She easily finds another teaching job in a town called... (full context)
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Lily trades beef for gasoline ration coupons and sets off with Rosemary in the hearse. They... (full context)
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...old folks’ home, where he appears very frail and is too sick to be moved. Lily is proud that Rosemary remains stoic beside her grandfather, and thinks that she has “a... (full context)
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Dad left the KC Ranch to Buster and the homestead on Salt Draw to Lily, but also owed thousands in back taxes. Lily debates selling the land to pay them... (full context)
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...war going on, the military is using the railroad system to ship troops and equipment. Lily and Jim take the cattle to market when the train is available in December, and... (full context)
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...need to know as a rancher. Jim agrees, and slaughters one a few days later. Lily reflects that unlike herself, Rosemary has grown up around cowboys and as such has been... (full context)
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...next summer Clarice Pearl, a woman with the Department of Education, writes to request that Lily drive her and a nurse to a Havasupai village to investigate hygiene standards. Lily asks... (full context)
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Lily tries to explain some background about local tribal traditions while she drives, but the officials... (full context)
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The next night Lily wakes to discover that Rosemary had snuck out to go swimming with Fidel and his... (full context)
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Lily sends Rosemary back to boarding school. The Poms declare their intention to sell the ranch.... (full context)
Chapter 8
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Lily and Jim get much needed dentures when they get to Phoenix, which makes Lily immensely... (full context)
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Jim gets a job as a warehouse manager and Lily as a high school teacher. They also buy other properties to rent out, for the... (full context)
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...Saturday. When Hiroshima happens, Rosemary is deeply disturbed by the atom bomb and disagrees with Lily that it was for the greater good. Rosemary paints and draws obsessively, which Lily considers... (full context)
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For the first time in her life, Lily does not enjoy teaching. Her wealthier students do not obey her, and no longer being... (full context)
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Gaiter calls Jim to offer him his job back managing the ranch, but he and Lily immediately agree that they do not want to have to work for Gaiter. Lily also... (full context)
Chapter 9
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Lily gets a job as a teacher in the tiny town of Horse Mesa, which has... (full context)
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Lily discovers she has a knack for politics. She helps the United Federation of Teachers stop... (full context)
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...named Diane and drops out of school to become a police officer. Upon his marriage, Lily thinks, “one down.” Lily agrees to let Rosemary study art in college as long she... (full context)
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...art. He comes to Horse Mesa to see her paintings, which he praises effusively. When Lily shows him her dentures, he pulls out his own, saying he lost his teeth in... (full context)
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Lily continues to be suspicious of Rex, who is charming but unstable. Rosemary likes Rex specifically... (full context)
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...spooked and takes off. Recognizing that the horse is scared and needs permission to stop, Lily stands in front of her and gets her to slow down. When she does stop,... (full context)
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The next day Lily insists that Rex is dangerous, but Rosemary says if you worry about danger you miss... (full context)
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Rex shows up with a bouquet of lilies by way of apology. Lily still insists that Rosemary needs an anchor in her life, but Rex says that makes... (full context)
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Rex pulls over to a trailer park and introduces Lily to Gus, an old air force buddy who jokingly warns Lily against letting Rex marry... (full context)
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That spring, Rosemary announces she is going to marry Rex, causing Lily to remark that she is the one kid she couldn’t teach. Rex decides not to... (full context)
Epilogue
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Lily and Jim stay in Horse Mesa, with Jim becoming the town’s unofficial mayor after he... (full context)