Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

by

J. K. Rowling

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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire: Chapter Eighteen Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Harry wakes up the next morning feeling miserable. He leaves the common room and comes face to face with Hermione, who has toast with her and suggests they go for a walk. He tells her what happened the night before and is thrilled that she believes him. Hermione thinks that Moody is right and someone fooled the goblet. She also says that Ron is extremely jealous, since Harry always gets all the attention. This makes Harry angry, but Hermione tries to change the subject and insists that Harry write to Sirius. Though he doesn't want to, Harry finally agrees.
When Hermione tries to make Harry see that Ron is just jealous, she's trying to encourage Harry to understand the ways in which his fame and power function and make others feel. Though there isn't a real fix in this situation, this does lead Harry to, in the future, make decisions that won't alienate Ron or that will help Ron feel more successful.
Themes
Empathy and Love Theme Icon
Good, Evil, Power, and Choice Theme Icon
Related Quotes
During lessons the next day, everyone seems convinced that Harry put his own name in. Hufflepuff students are especially cold to all Gryffindors, while Ron refuses to speak to Harry at all. In Care of Magical Creatures, Malfoy taunts Harry that he's going to die during the Tournament. Fortunately, Hagrid's lesson plan--taking the skrewts for walks--distracts Malfoy. Hagrid tells Harry he believes that Harry didn't put his own name in, but he seems worried about Harry's prospects.
The fact that Hagrid, an adult that Harry trusts, fears for Harry's fate in the tournament suggests that what's to come will be far above what Harry is capable of doing at this point in his magical education. In other words, it reinforces how young and immature Harry is and situates this Tournament as the experience that will bring about Harry's coming of age.
Themes
History, Community, and Coming of Age Theme Icon
Empathy and Love Theme Icon
Harry's next few days are horrendous, especially since Ron continues to ignore Harry. Harry understands why the Hufflepuffs hate him, especially since Cedric looks so much more like a champion. All of this is so distracting that Harry gets extra homework on Summoning Charms in Flitwick's class. When he and Hermione arrive in the dungeons for Potions, they see that every Slytherin student is wearing a badge that reads "Support Cedric Diggory--the REAL Hogwarts Champion!" When tapped, the badge changes to read "Potter Stinks." Ron doesn't stand up for Harry as the Slytherins laugh, but Hermione does. Malfoy insults her and Harry snaps. The boys shoot curses at each other that ricochet and hit Goyle and Hermione. Hermione's front teeth start growing rapidly.
Harry's observation that Cedric looks more like a champion again shows how hyperaware he is of how others perceive him in comparison to the other three champions, something that's related to where Harry is in puberty right now. He's still self-involved and thinks mostly about himself. Though Ron is certainly partially to blame at this point, this is likely one of the reasons that Harry and Ron aren't able to make up yet, as Harry cannot yet truly empathize with how Ron feels.
Themes
Empathy and Love Theme Icon
Snape arrives and listens to Malfoy accuse Harry of attacking him. He sends Goyle to the hospital wing and, upon seeing Hermione's teeth, insists that he doesn't see a difference in her appearance. Hermione starts to cry and runs away. Both Harry and Ron shout at Snape and he gives them detention. Ron chooses to sit with Dean and Seamus rather than Harry. Harry is livid, especially when Snape insinuates that he's going to poison Harry today to test his antidote. However, before Harry can begin brewing, Colin Creevy arrives to fetch Harry for Bagman and the Daily Prophet.
Snape's assessment of Hermione's appearance shows that, when given the option to be kind or cruel, Snape will nearly always choose to be cruel. His decision to send Goyle to the hospital wing, however, shows that Snape is capable of being kind to students; he just chooses not to and therefore becomes a "bad guy" in Harry, Ron, and Hermione's eyes.
Themes
Good, Evil, Power, and Choice Theme Icon
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Colin leads Harry to a classroom where there's an area set up for photos. Bagman leaps at the sight of Harry and explains that it's time to weigh the champions’ wands to test that they're in good condition. He introduces Harry to Rita Skeeter, who's working on a piece for the Daily Prophet. She asks if she can interview Harry and leads him to a broom cupboard. She asks to use a Quick-Quotes Quill and stands the acid green quill upright on a piece of parchment. When she tests it by giving it her name, it writes observations about her appearance and reputation. The quill writes of its own accord as Skeeter asks questions that seek to paint Harry as a rebel and a loveable underdog. She asks about his parents and he notices the quill writing that he's crying, though he isn’t. Fortunately, Dumbledore rescues Harry.
The Quick-Quotes Quill functions as a device that bridges the gap between what people say and what's published in the paper, and it does so right before Harry's eyes. By giving Harry insight into the specific mechanism that does this, the novel prepares Harry to understand why Rita Skeeter's articles contain the kinds of reporting they do--which in turn, allows Harry to understand that they don't tell a version of the truth that's trustworthy.
Themes
Reading, Critical Thinking, and Truth Theme Icon
Related Quotes
Harry takes a seat next to Cedric. Dumbledore introduces Mr. Ollivander, a Diagon Alley wand maker. He checks Fleur's wand first, then Krum's, Cedric's, and Harry's. All are in working order, and Harry is glad that Ollivander doesn't mention that Harry's wand shares a core with Voldemort's. The following photos take a long time to get right and when the adults finally release Harry, it's dinnertime. Harry eats alone and then returns to the dormitory. Ron briskly points out an owl for Harry and tells him about their detention arrangements with Snape. The letter is from Sirius and asks Harry to be alone by the fireplace late one night in November.
Again, though Harry has the opportunity here to try to make up with Ron and show some empathy for Ron's situation, he chooses not to. This again reminds the reader that becoming empathetic and a good person is something that someone chooses to do; it's not a natural or given state of being. When Harry is happy to keep his wand's history secret, it shows that he now understands how dangerous information can be if it gets into the wrong hands (like Rita Skeeter's).
Themes
Empathy and Love Theme Icon
Reading, Critical Thinking, and Truth Theme Icon
Good, Evil, Power, and Choice Theme Icon