Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

by

J. K. Rowling

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire can help.

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire: Chapter Seven Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Harry gets to his feet and sees that he's on a moor. Two grumpy wizards, dressed in mismatched Muggle clothes, greet Mr. Weasley and direct him towards his campsite. They come to a stone cottage and greet the man there, Mr. Roberts. He's clearly the only real Muggle present. Harry helps Mr. Weasley count out the Muggle money as Mr. Roberts says that the campers have been weird and foreign. Suddenly, a wizard appears next to Mr. Roberts, shouts "Obliviate," and Mr. Roberts dreamily gives Mr. Weasley his change. The wizard mutters that Ludo Bagman isn't helping with Mr. Roberts, since he keeps talking about Quidditch in front of him.
This wizard's aside about Ludo Bagman indicates that not all wizards take security as seriously as Mr. Weasley's explanation would've had Harry believe, given that Bagman doesn't seem concerned about keeping things secret from Muggles. This wizard's displeasure about Bagman begins to suggest that there's something to Percy's assessment, and that Bagman isn't an entirely good person.
Themes
History, Community, and Coming of Age Theme Icon
Good, Evil, Power, and Choice Theme Icon
Some of the tents look normal, while others have chimneys, gardens, and turrets. Mr. Weasley finds his spot and asks Harry and Hermione to help him set up the tents. When they're erected, Harry wonders how ten people will fit in them, but this question is soon answered for him: inside, the boys' tent has three rooms and a bathroom. Mr. Weasley sends Ron, Harry, and Hermione to fetch water, insisting they can't use the oven in the tent, to preserve anti-Muggle security. Harry realizes that he's never thought about how many wizards there must be in the world as he looks at the witches and wizards milling around.
Mr. Weasley's sense of what's appropriate in terms of security seems charming in light of the fact that a small tent has three rooms inside it. This shows that Mr. Weasley's conception of what the Muggle world is like is skewed, just as Vernon Dursley's beliefs regarding the Wizarding world are skewed. Harry's observation about the other witches and wizards continues to expand his understanding of his world.
Themes
History, Community, and Coming of Age Theme Icon
Empathy and Love Theme Icon
When Harry, Ron, and Hermione get to a group of tents covered in green shamrocks in support of the Irish team, they run into Seamus Finnigan and Dean Thomas, friends from Hogwarts. When the group climbs over the next hill, they see that the Bulgarian supporters' tents are covered in moving posters of Viktor Krum, the Bulgarian Seeker. Hermione remarks that he looks grumpy as the trio joins the line for water. This offends Ron, who admires Krum. They watch a Ministry wizard argue with another wizard who's wearing a ladies' nightgown and refusing to wear pants.
Hermione's assessment of Krum is innocuous in this situation, but it's telling that she makes this kind of judgment based only on Krum's appearance. Though Hermione will go on to be one of the most forward-thinking and openhearted individuals in Harry's circle, it's telling that she's also capable of making snap judgments about people--she's human, like anyone else.
Themes
Reading, Critical Thinking, and Truth Theme Icon
Activism and Diversity Theme Icon
After they get their water, Harry, Ron, and Hermione see several other friends from school. Harry realizes how many other Wizarding schools there must be in the world as he sees a group of foreign teenagers. Back at the tent, Hermione helps Mr. Weasley light a fire and Mr. Weasley tells Harry and Hermione about all the Ministry people passing by. Just after Bill, Charlie, and Percy arrive around lunchtime, Ludo Bagman stops by and happily says that everything is going well. He invites Mr. Weasley to bet on the match. Fred and George bet their entire savings and a fake wand on the improbable chance that Ireland will win, but Krum will get the Snitch. Bagman is thrilled with the fake wand and Percy looks scandalized at this.
Harry's realization that there are other Wizarding schools specifically helps to show him that the Wizarding world isn't just made up of adults--there are other fourteen-year-old wizards out there, just like him. In turn, this helps him develop a sense of camaraderie with these other teens. When Percy is so scandalized that Bagman thinks the twins' wand is funny, it shows that he agrees with Mrs. Weasley that there are defined and delineated ways for a young wizard to move forward in life, and joke wands aren't part of that.
Themes
History, Community, and Coming of Age Theme Icon
Empathy and Love Theme Icon
Related Quotes
Get the entire Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire LitChart as a printable PDF.
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire PDF
Bagman asks for a cup of tea and says he's looking for Mr. Crouch to translate for him. He settles himself and unconcernedly says that there's no news of Bertha Jorkins. Mr. Crouch arrives. He's dressed in a crisp suit and looks highly polished; Harry thinks that Percy's idolization makes sense. Mr. Crouch impatiently says that the Bulgarians want them to add seats to the Top Box and when Percy offers him tea, he calls Percy "Weatherby." He also tells Mr. Weasley that someone wants to talk to him about importing flying carpets, which is currently illegal.
When Mr. Crouch doesn't know Percy's name, even though it's implied that Percy has been in his office for about three months, it shows that Mr. Crouch doesn't think much of individuals below him in rank. This suggests that Crouch only gives time and attention to wizards he considers worthwhile--and that even perfect Percy isn't worthy of his attention.
Themes
Empathy and Love Theme Icon
Good, Evil, Power, and Choice Theme Icon
Bagman tries to talk about the other event that they're organizing, but Mr. Crouch insists that not all the details have been finalized and they can't tell anyone yet. He finally cuts Bagman off, thanks Percy for the tea, and leads Bagman away. Throughout the rest of the day, the excitement in the air intensifies and the Ministry stops trying to prevent people from performing magic. Ron purchases Ireland souvenirs as well as a figurine of Viktor Krum, while Harry buys both Ron and Hermione Omnioculars, which allow a person to slow down action and provide play-by-play breakdowns.
It's telling that Percy idolizes Mr. Crouch so much, even though Mr. Crouch isn't particularly kind to him. This suggests that Percy is beginning to internalize that this is an appropriate way to treat people who are less powerful than him, which doesn't bode well for Percy as an adult in the world. With this, the novel shows how role models can function to show young people what they can be as they grow, even when those examples may not be positive.
Themes
History, Community, and Coming of Age Theme Icon
Empathy and Love Theme Icon
Good, Evil, Power, and Choice Theme Icon