Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

by

J. K. Rowling

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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire: Chapter Six Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Harry wakes before dawn when Mrs. Weasley shakes him. In the kitchen Mr. Weasley asks Harry to check to make sure that his Muggle outfit is appropriate, while Fred grumbles about Percy, Bill, and Charlie getting to Apparate to the match. Harry learns that wizards must pass a test to Apparate and there are many possible complications to doing it wrong, including Splinching (leaving parts of one's body behind). Just as Mr. Weasley starts to lead the group out the door, Mrs. Weasley notices something in George's pockets and starts Summoning Ton-Tongue Toffees out of them. Fred shouts that they spent six months developing the candies, which Mrs. Weasley insists is why they didn't get more O.W.L.s. The twins leave without kissing her goodbye.
Again, the revelation that wizards must take a test in order to Apparate legally continues to add to Harry's conception of what adult wizard life is like, especially since Apparation is held up as being akin to learning to drive a car or at the very least, independently navigate public transit in the Muggle world. Mrs. Weasley's outburst about the Ton-Tongue Toffees again indicates that she has a very narrow view of what's appropriate for her children to aspire to, and that she's going to do whatever she can to push them in a direction she approves of.
Themes
History, Community, and Coming of Age Theme Icon
As they walk, Mr. Weasley tells Harry about all the precautions the Ministry has put in place to organize the World Cup and keep Muggles away. He says that most wizards are getting to the match using Portkeys, which are objects that are bewitched to transport large groups. The group climbs a steep hill and then begins to look for the Portkey. A man yells to Mr. Weasley that he has it; it's an old boot. Mr. Weasley introduces Amos Diggory and his son, Cedric, a sixth-year Hufflepuff and Quidditch player at Hogwarts. Mr. Diggory notices Harry and says that he's told Cedric that beating Harry Potter at Quidditch last year will be something to tell his children. Cedric looks embarrassed and tries to make his father stop.
When Harry learns about the tools the Ministry uses to organize the World Cup and for transportation, he begins to get a sense of how huge this endeavor is and what goes into making the Wizarding world the way it is. In essence, this shows Harry that his world has many layers that he hasn't yet considered, given that his experience in this world has thus far been confined to the school years at Hogwarts and brief visits to the Weasleys' home during summer vacations.
Themes
History, Community, and Coming of Age Theme Icon
With a minute until the appointed time, Mr. Weasley explains that everyone needs to touch the Portkey. They all stand in a circle around the boot and suddenly, Harry feels as though a hook is grabbing his stomach. He lurches forward and flies through the air, finally slamming into the ground and falling over.
Again, introducing Harry to this other mode of transportation in the Wizarding world allows him to expand his conception of the limits of his world.
Themes
History, Community, and Coming of Age Theme Icon