Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

by

J. K. Rowling

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Hogwarts: A History Symbol Analysis

Hogwarts: A History Symbol Icon

Hogwarts: A History is one of Hermione's favorite books and has been for the previous three years that she's been a Hogwarts student. It offers the history of the school and an overview of the various magical rules and enchantments that protect the school. For example, the book informs Hermione that it is impossible to Apparate on school grounds. However, at the beginning of her fourth year, Hermione discovers her beloved reference text leaves a number of things out in its exploration of Hogwarts--namely, that all the domestic labor at the school is performed by house-elves. This impresses on Hermione that she can't believe everything she reads outright; instead, she needs to understand that everything written expresses information from the perspective of the writer, rather than presenting an objective truth. This realization brings about Hermione's intellectual coming-of-age, turning her into an adult capable of thinking critically about what she reads.

Hogwarts: A History Quotes in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

The Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire quotes below all refer to the symbol of Hogwarts: A History. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
History, Community, and Coming of Age Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Scholastic edition of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire published in 2002.
Chapter Fifteen Quotes

"It's all in Hogwarts: A History. Though, of course, that book's not entirely reliable. A Revised History of Hogwarts would be a more accurate title. Or A Highly Biased and Selective History of Hogwarts, Which Glosses Over the Nastier Aspects of the School."

"What are you on about?" said Ron, though Harry thought he knew what was coming.

"House-elves!" said Hermione, her eyes flashing. "Not once, in over a thousand pages, does Hogwarts: A History mention that we are all colluding in the oppression of a hundred slaves!"

Related Characters: Ron Weasley (speaker), Hermione Granger (speaker), Harry Potter
Related Symbols: Hogwarts: A History
Page Number: 238
Explanation and Analysis:
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Hogwarts: A History Symbol Timeline in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

The timeline below shows where the symbol Hogwarts: A History appears in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter Fifteen
Reading, Critical Thinking, and Truth Theme Icon
...the judging. Hermione interjects that three of the judges will be school headmasters, according to Hogwarts: A History . She suggests that the book should actually be called A Revised History of Hogwarts... (full context)
Chapter Twenty-Eight
Reading, Critical Thinking, and Truth Theme Icon
...her. Harry suggests that Skeeter is electronically bugging Hermione, but Hermione says that according to Hogwarts: A History , Muggle technology doesn't work at Hogwarts. (full context)