Harvest

by

Jim Crace

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The owner of the land on which the village is situated. Since Master Kent produced no sons with his wife, Lucy, her property is entailed to her cousin, Jordan. Jordan arrives in the village with the intention of converting it from collective agriculture to sheep farming, a business which will concentrate most of the profits in his hands and displace most of the villagers. Casting himself as a champion of “progress” but possessing no morals or respect for the people who have farmed his land for centuries, Jordan is emblematic of a pernicious modernity which strives for innovation and productivity without considering the human cost of these endeavors, ultimately conferring prosperity on a chosen few while disenfranchising the majority. He’s a notable foil to Master Kent, who shares his aristocratic background but completely lacks his pretensions and his aspirations to wealth.

Edmund Jordan Quotes in Harvest

The Harvest quotes below are all either spoken by Edmund Jordan or refer to Edmund Jordan. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Renewal and Decay Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Vintage edition of Harvest published in 2013.
Chapter 6 Quotes

I bring you sheep, and I supply a Holy Shepherd too. There’ll be a steeple, higher than the turret of this house, taller than any ancient oak that we might fell. This place will be visible from far. And I will have a bell cast for the very top of it to summon everyone to prayer. And hurry everyone to work.

Related Characters: Edmund Jordan (speaker), Master Kent
Related Symbols: Sheep
Page Number: 91
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

There’s nothing like a show of heavy justice–and a swinging corpse–to persuade a populace not used to formal discipline that their compliance in all matters–including those regarding wool and fence–is beyond debate.

Related Characters: Walter Thirsk (speaker), Edmund Jordan
Related Symbols: Sheep
Page Number: 108
Explanation and Analysis:

“Nothing but sheep,” he says, and laughs out loud. His joke, I think, is this: we are the sheep, already here, and munching at the grass. There’s none more pitiful than us, he thinks. There’s none more meek. There’s none to match our peevish fearfulness, our thoughtless lives, our vacant, puny faces, our dependency, our fretful scurrying, our plaints.

Related Characters: Walter Thirsk (speaker), Edmund Jordan
Related Symbols: Sheep
Page Number: 110
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

But none of these compare for patterned vividness with Mr. Quill’s designs. His endeavors are tidier and more wildly colorful–they’re certainly more blue–than anything that nature can provide. They’re rewarding in themselves. They are more pleasing than a barleycorn.

Related Characters: Walter Thirsk (speaker), Philip Earle/Mr. Quill, Edmund Jordan
Page Number: 119
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 9 Quotes

Dissent is never counted. It is weighed. The master always weighs the most. Besides, they can’t draw up a petition and fit it to the doorway of the church as other places do. It only takes a piece of paper and a nail, that’s true. But, even if they had a doorway to a church, none of them has a signature.

Related Characters: Walter Thirsk (speaker), Master Kent, Edmund Jordan, Lizzie Carr
Page Number: 130
Explanation and Analysis:

Our church ground has been desecrated by our surliness. Our usual scriptures are abused. This body on the cross is not the one that’s promised us. Yet, once again, it’s Mr. Quill who teaches us our shortcomings. It’s Mr. Quill who’s intimate and kind. It’s Mr. Quill who’s valiant. It will not make him popular.

Related Symbols: The Pillory
Page Number: 132
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 10 Quotes

“I have the sense my cousin is taking pleasure from sowing these anxieties, in the same way we take pleasure in the sowing of our seed,” says Master Kent. “I fear his harvesting. I think he means to shear us all, then turn us into mutton.”

Related Characters: Master Kent (speaker), Walter Thirsk, Edmund Jordan
Related Symbols: Sheep
Page Number: 142
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 11 Quotes

He must realize I’m not truly a villager. He knows I used to be the manor man. He sees that I stand apart. I’m separate. Indeed, I haven’t felt as separate in years. Perhaps it’s just as well, this recent, saddening detachment from the drove. I almost welcome it. These loose roots might save me yet.

Related Characters: Walter Thirsk (speaker), Edmund Jordan
Page Number: 161
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 13 Quotes

We’re used to looking out and seeing what’s preceded us, and what will also outlive us. Now we have to contemplate a land bare of both. Those woods that linked us to eternity will be removed by spring […] That grizzled oak which we believe is so old it must have come from Eden to our fields will be felled and rooted out.

Related Characters: Walter Thirsk (speaker), Master Kent, Edmund Jordan
Page Number: 174
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 14 Quotes

Frost and furrows. That’s the prompt. I know my duty now. I have to put the earth to the plow. The time has come to put the earth to plow, no matter what the Jordans say. The frost will finish what the plow begins. Winter will provide the spring.

Related Characters: Walter Thirsk (speaker), Edmund Jordan
Page Number: 190
Explanation and Analysis:

The plowing’s done. The seed is spread. The weather is reminding me that, rain or shine, the earth abides, the land endures, the soil will persevere forever and a day. Its smell is pungent and high-seasoned. This is happiness.

Page Number: 207
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Harvest LitChart as a printable PDF.
Harvest PDF

Edmund Jordan Character Timeline in Harvest

The timeline below shows where the character Edmund Jordan appears in Harvest. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 5
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Outsiders and Blame Theme Icon
Around the same time, Edmund Jordan arrives with five servants, blowing his saddle horn to signal his approach. Walter says he... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
For the moment, the village has to welcome Edmund Jordan. The gentlemen pass into the manor house, the three sidemen carry the luggage, and Walter... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
A tall man dressed in a fine doublet, Master Jordan stands at one end of the room. He’s talking to Mr. Quill, and Walter can... (full context)
Chapter 6
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Outsiders and Blame Theme Icon
...Kitty. He’s too busy thinking over and replaying what he heard in the gallery. Master Jordan seems like an “efficient” and sensible man, although “sometimes his sense is colder than an... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Having dispatched these problems, Master Jordan announces his plans for “Progress and Prosperity.” His plan is no different from the one... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Jordan will allow Master Kent to stay on in the village, administering his affairs and directing... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Religion and Ritual Theme Icon
...cousin that there are sixty villagers who depend on the common land for food. Master Jordan only shrugs, saying that Mr. Baynham will employ the people he needs, but “we will... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Master Jordan quips that it’s Mr. Earle who doesn’t have to make economies, since he’s disabled and... (full context)
Chapter 7
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Walter himself isn’t sure who’s responsible. He’s suspicious of Master Jordan’s groom, who seems easily angered, but it could also be Brooker Higgs or the Derby... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Master Jordan gathers everyone and informs them they must stay within the barn while his men search... (full context)
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Master Jordan says that the village is too far from “ordinance and regulation,” and that they will... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
After the gathering, Master Kent relates his grievances to Walter. Jordan wanted to sell Willowjack’s carcass to grease makers, and it was only after prolonged argument... (full context)
Renewal and Decay Theme Icon
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Outsiders and Blame Theme Icon
Walter imagines Master Kent has been planning his negotiations with Jordan long before the new master arrived or anyone knew of his plans. However, everything seems... (full context)
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Walter is required to guide Jordan’s servants through the villages while they ransack the different cottages. He hasn’t been inside many... (full context)
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Religion and Ritual Theme Icon
...check search various outbuildings for bloody cloth. Inspecting the building where Cecily grew up, Master Jordan discovers a bloodstained piece of cloth, which Walter and Master Kent immediately recognize as Mistress... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Master Jordan considers this possibility. It makes sense, but Walter knows he wants to hang someone in... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Outsiders and Blame Theme Icon
Jordan questions Master Kent about the younger stranger, still imprisoned in the pillory. Affecting to be... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Religion and Ritual Theme Icon
Master Jordan paces in a circle “like a preacher.” Looking around the land, he laughs and says,... (full context)
Chapter 8
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
...sad to think of leaving Master Kent, but he’d prefer that to living under Master Jordan’s rule. He works as meticulously as possible turning dried calfskin into vellum, although he doesn’t... (full context)
Chapter 9
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
...night, Walter relates that Lizzie Carr, the young Gleaning Queen, has been detained by Master Jordan, along with Anne Rogers and Kitty Gosse. The youngest and strongest men should be agitating... (full context)
Outsiders and Blame Theme Icon
...possibility that “she’s brought a curse onto our land.” They’ve told their suspicion to Master Jordan, but instead he’s targeting their women and children. (full context)
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
...silence towards him, Walter intuits that if the villagers have to implicate someone to allay Jordan’s wrath, they will choose him, rather than sacrificing a native villager. Walter doesn’t blame them—after... (full context)
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
...Master Kent to employ him again. He can help his old master stand up to Jordan and keep his place in the house. While Walter feels he has many options for... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
While Walter listens, the villagers decide they must “petition” Jordan for the return of the women. They are certain that, as the majority, they will... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
...want to storm the manor house with sticks, but this isn’t a popular idea, given Jordan’s fierce sidemen. Others want to let the drama run its course and trust that Jordan... (full context)
Chapter 10
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Religion and Ritual Theme Icon
...kept them waiting outside the house, refusing to let them see Master Kent or Master Jordan. Instead, Mr. Baynham came to the door and suggested cryptically that there’s “witchery about.” Walter... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Outsiders and Blame Theme Icon
...the Chart-Maker’s accomplice. With so many more logical culprits to pursue, the villagers assume that Jordan will free the women. (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
...own version of events. He spent the night locked in his room, but he heard Jordan’s men torturing Anne and Kitty and probably raping them until they confessed to witchcraft. Master... (full context)
Religion and Ritual Theme Icon
The sidemen brought these confessions to Master Jordan, who was smoking downstairs. Next, they brought in the confused Lizzie Carr and induced her... (full context)
Outsiders and Blame Theme Icon
...to the strangers. Master Kent says that Mr. Quill is still at large, but that Jordan’s men are searching for him now. (full context)
Chapter 11
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Walter sees Master Jordan’s groom prowling around the village. He imagines the man feels dissatisfied, since as a lesser... (full context)
Renewal and Decay Theme Icon
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
...Walter knows the man doesn’t understand how much the villagers hate everyone associated with Master Jordan. On any other day, they’d be too busy working to bother with him, but with... (full context)
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
...and asks roughly where his daughter is. Thinking himself protected by his attachment to Master Jordan, the groom responds scornfully, telling him that she’s likely to burn with the other women.... (full context)
Renewal and Decay Theme Icon
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Outsiders and Blame Theme Icon
...not have seen a human face before.” This means they’ll be safer from pursuit by Jordan’s men. Walter hopes they reach another village in a few days, where they can build... (full context)
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
...of her ongoing imprisonment. He doesn’t want to stay in his own cottage in case Jordan’s men come looking for him. Now that the villagers have left, he could sleep wherever... (full context)
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
On the other hand, Master Kent has told Walter that Master Jordan doesn’t suspect him, and on the contrary considers him a man he can “rely upon.”... (full context)
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Outsiders and Blame Theme Icon
...sleeps fitfully all night. In his dreams, he’s tormented by “demons” who say that he’s Jordan’s servant now, and that worse things are coming for him. He also dreams that his... (full context)
Renewal and Decay Theme Icon
Outsiders and Blame Theme Icon
...in the village who was born in the area. The only people left are Walter, Jordan and his men, and Mr. Quill and the strangers. (full context)
Chapter 12
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
The next morning, with the village empty, Master Jordan is pleased. He invites Walter into the manor house and feeds him breakfast while asking... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Religion and Ritual Theme Icon
...that he’s worried Master Kent will be “deposed,” showing his loyalty to his old master. Jordan reassures Walter that Master Kent will be taken care of. Jordan lectures Walter on his... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Innocently, Walter asks where Mr. Quill is. Jordan doesn’t respond but only remarks that his cheek is very bruised, and that he hopes... (full context)
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Jordan informs Walter that he and Master Kent will leave today, taking the prisoners with them.... (full context)
Renewal and Decay Theme Icon
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Religion and Ritual Theme Icon
...master could be “mistaken for equals,” since they look so similar. Master Kent says that Jordan became less interested in his captives after the villagers fled, and he was able to... (full context)
Chapter 13
Renewal and Decay Theme Icon
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
By midday, Walter is waiting with the horses for Jordan’s departure. They’re unsettled because, with the groom out of commission, they’ve been free for the... (full context)
Renewal and Decay Theme Icon
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
Soon, Walter sees Master Kent and Master Jordan riding next to each other. Their large hats identify them as rich men, since they... (full context)
Religion and Ritual Theme Icon
...women before they reach the town. To Walter, the procession looks like a pageant, with Jordan representing “Privilege,” followed by “the Guilty and the Innocent,” and with “Despair,” invisible, bringing up... (full context)
Chapter 14
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
...lay and the room where the sidemen slept and tortured the women. Walter takes Master Jordan’s bed, which is covered in carpets. When he lies down on this makeshift nest, he... (full context)
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Religion and Ritual Theme Icon
...that he’d be happy to remain in the village, despite his shame at submitting to Jordan’s authority. However, this morning he feels haunted and fearful, and wonders if he should have... (full context)
Chapter 15
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
Progress and Dispossession Theme Icon
...improper. After all, he slept in Kitty’s cottage because he didn’t feel right taking Master Jordan’s bed. He imagines they’ve lit the fire in the kitchen, probably using furniture as fuel... (full context)
Individuals and the Community Theme Icon
...are to blame for everything, even though Walter knows that nothing would have prevented Master Jordan from arriving and disrupting the village life. Still, the mushrooms have “set our lives alight.” (full context)
Chapter 16
Outsiders and Blame Theme Icon
...been a night ago, or earlier, when the imprisoned women named him. He wonders if Jordan’s men or the young man and Mistress Beldam are responsible. He feels that he’s failed... (full context)