Henry IV Part 1

Hotspur (Henry Percy) Character Analysis

Read our modern English translation.
As the son of Northumberland and nephew to Worcester, Hotspur is a rebel and a Percy. He is a hotheaded, bloodthirsty warrior who can’t control his speech or restrain his own rages. Hotspur furiously resents King Henry’s power and proudly looks down on Prince Hal, whom he believes to be a lowlife, dishonorable sissy compared to himself.

Hotspur (Henry Percy) Quotes in Henry IV Part 1

The Henry IV Part 1 quotes below are all either spoken by Hotspur (Henry Percy) or refer to Hotspur (Henry Percy). For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Appearances Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Simon & Schuster edition of Henry IV Part 1 published in 2005.
Act 1, Scene 1 Quotes

…thou mak’st me sad and mak’st me sin
In envy that my Lord Northumberland
Should be the father to so blest a son—
A son who is the theme of honour’s tongue,
Amongst a grove the very straightest plant,
Who is sweet Fortune’s minion and her pride—
Whilst I, by looking on the praise of him
See riot and dishnor stain the brow
Of my young Harry. O, that it could be proved
That some night-tripping fairy had exchanged
In cradle clothes our children where they lay,
And called mine Percy, his Plantagenet!

Related Characters: King Henry IV (speaker), Prince Hal (Henry, Prince of Wales), Hotspur (Henry Percy), Northumberland
Page Number: 1.1.77-88
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariat

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniLorem iLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse c

A+

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Henry IV Part 1 quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Act 1, Scene 3 Quotes

With many holiday and lady terms
He questioned me; amongst the rest demanded
My prisoners in your majesty’s behalf.
I then, all smarting with my wounds being cold—
To be so pestered with a popinjay!—
Out of my grief and my impatience
Answered neglectingly, I know not what—
He should, or should not—for he made me mad
To see him shine so brisk, and smell so sweet,
And talk so like a waiting gentlewoman

So cowardly, and but for these vile guns
He would himself have been a soldier.

Related Characters: Hotspur (Henry Percy) (speaker), King Henry IV
Page Number: 1.3.47-66
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culp

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est labor

But shall it be that you, that set the crown
Upon the head of this forgetful man
And for his sake wear the detested blot
Of murderous subornation, shall it be,
That you a world of curses undergo,
Being the agents, or base second means,
The cords, the ladder, or the hangman rather?

Related Characters: Hotspur (Henry Percy) (speaker), King Henry IV, Northumberland
Page Number: 1.3.164-170
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in repre

Act 2, Scene 3 Quotes

Thy spirit within thee hath been so at war,
And thus hath so bestirr’d thee in thy sleep,
That beads of sweat have stood upon thy brow,
Like bubbles in a late-disturbed stream;
And in thy face strange motions have appear’d
Such as we see when men restrain their breath
On some great sudden hest. O, what portents are these?
Some heavy business hath my lord in hand,
And I must know it, else he loves me not.

Related Characters: Lady Kate Percy (speaker), Hotspur (Henry Percy)
Page Number: 2.3.58-67
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident,

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Act 3, Scene 1 Quotes

…you are too willful-blame;
And since your coming hither have done enough
To put him quite beside his patience.
You must needs learn, lord, to amend this fault:
Though sometimes it shows greatness, courage, blood—
And that’s the dearest grace it renders you,--
Yet oftentimes it doth present harsh rage,
Defect of manners, want of government,
Pride, haughtiness, opinion and disdain…

Related Characters: Earl of Worcester (speaker), Hotspur (Henry Percy)
Related Symbols: Blood
Page Number: 3.1.182-191
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate ve

Act 4, Scene 3 Quotes

…the King hath sent to know
The nature of your griefs; and whereupon
You conjure them from the breast of civil peace
Such bold hostility, teaching his duteous land
Audacious cruelty. If that the King
Have any way your good deserts forgot,
Which he confesseth to be manifold,
He bids you name your griefs; and with all speed
You shall have your desires with interest,
And pardon absolute for yourself and these
Herein misled by your suggestion.

Related Characters: Sir Walter Blunt (speaker), Hotspur (Henry Percy), King Henry IV, Earl of Worcester, Earl of Douglas, Sir Richard Vernon
Page Number: 4.3.47-57
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in cu

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est

Disgraced me in my happy victories,
Sought to entrap me by intelligence,
Rated mine uncle from the council board,
In rage dismissed my father from the court,
Broke oath on oath, committed wrong on wrong,
And in conclusion drove us to seek out
This head of safety, and withal to pry
Into his title, the which we find
Too indirect for long continuance.

Related Characters: Hotspur (Henry Percy) (speaker), King Henry IV
Page Number: 4.3.104-112
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui offi

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Act 5, Scene 2 Quotes

Arm, arm with speed: and, fellows, soldiers, friends,
Better consider what you have to do
Than I, that have not well the gift of tongue,
Can lift your blood up with persuasion.

Related Characters: Hotspur (Henry Percy) (speaker)
Page Number: 5.2.78-82
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolo

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo conLorem ipLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, cLorem ipLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam,

Get the entire Henry IV Part 1 LitChart as a printable PDF.
Henry iv part 1.pdf.medium

Hotspur (Henry Percy) Character Timeline in Henry IV Part 1

The timeline below shows where the character Hotspur (Henry Percy) appears in Henry IV Part 1. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, Scene 1
Honor Theme Icon
The Right to be King Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
Westmoreland explains that there’s more bad news to top off the Mortimer tragedy. Hotspur (Henry Percy, son of the Earl of Northumberland), and Archibald (Earl of Douglas) fought bloodily... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
Honor Theme Icon
The Right to be King Theme Icon
...he suddenly grows sad and jealous of Lord Northumberland whose honorable, upright son Henry Percy (Hotspur) puts the King’s own son Prince Henry (Prince Hal) to shame. The king wishes he... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
Honor Theme Icon
The Right to be King Theme Icon
Making himself change the subject, King Henry asks Westmoreland what he thinks of Hotspur’s pride, since Percy has sent word that he will keep all his war prisoners for... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 3
Honor Theme Icon
The Right to be King Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
In another room of the London palace, King Henry, Northumberland, Worcester, Hotspur, and Sir Walter Blunt gather with attendants. King Henry announces that he’s been acting too... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
Honor Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
Northumberland explains that there’s been a misunderstanding and that Hotspur never actually refused to turn over prisoners to King Henry. Hotspur himself chimes in, affirming... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
King Henry protests that in fact Hotspur still denies the crown his prisoners, since he has only agreed to turn them over... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
Hotspur protests that Mortimer has always been completely loyal to King Henry and that he has... (full context)
The Right to be King Theme Icon
Worcester returns. To Worcester, Hotspur angrily declares his loyalty to “the down-trod Mortimer” and vows to raise him higher than... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
The Right to be King Theme Icon
King Richard’s proclamation is news to Hotspur, who says that King Henry’s animosity towards Mortimer makes total sense to him now. He... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
Honor Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Worcester interrupts Hotspur’s speech, telling him to “say no more” for Worcester wants to tell him a secret.... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Worcester tries to explain a plan but keeps getting interrupted by Hotspur’s excited outbursts about his loyalty to Mortimer, his refusal to give up his prisoners, and... (full context)
The Right to be King Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
Worcester lays out his plot: Hotspur will release his prisoners without ransom, keeping only Douglas’ son as a bargaining chip against... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
...has always been suspicious of them and is now starting to punish them. He tells Hotspur to wait to act until he receives Worcester’s OK by letter. Hotspur exclaims excitedly that... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 3
Honor Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
At Warkworth Castle, Hotspur enters reading a letter from Richard Scroop, the Archbishop of York, that expresses wariness about... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Lady Kate Percy enters and Hotspur announces he’ll be leaving her within two hours. Lady Percy, distressed, begs Hotspur to tell... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Hotspur calls a servant to prepare his horse. He hasn’t been listening to Lady Percy at... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 1
Honor Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Hotspur, Worcester, Mortimer, and Glendower gather in a room of the Archdeacon’s house in Bangor, Wales.... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
...his birth was marked by fiery celestial portents and a great earthquake, signifying Glendower’s power. Hotspur retorts that such “signs” aren’t signs at all, but just common, natural phenomena that would... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Mortimer breaks up Glendower and Hotspur’s bickering by calling the men to the map. He shows them the three equal portions... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Hotspur and Glendower argue, and Hotspur insults Glendower’s English (Glendower is Welsh). Insulted, Glendower insists he... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Mortimer chastises Hotspur for fighting so much with Glendower. Hotspur says he can’t help it, he gets so... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Hotspur remarks that Welsh music is played by the devil and that he’d rather listen to... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 2
Appearances Theme Icon
Honor Theme Icon
The Right to be King Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
...more myself.” King Henry continues his long speech, comparing Prince Hal to King Richard and Hotspur to himself. He declares Hotspur a worthier heir to the throne than Hal and lists... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
Honor Theme Icon
The Right to be King Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
...own long speech asking forgiveness for past behavior and vowing to redeem himself by defeating Hotspur, and affirming he is King Henry’s son by achieving glory. Hal says he “will wear... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 1
Warfare Theme Icon
Hotspur, Worcester, and Douglas converse at the rebel camp near Shrewsbury. Hotspur and Douglas flatter one... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
Hotspur dismisses Worcester’s fears, insisting that fighting without Northumberland gives them a chance to win even... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
Honor Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
...come with even more. Vernon describes Prince Hal as “feather’d Mercury,” magnificently outfitted for battle. Hotspur balks at Vernon’s praise of Hal and declares that all King Henry’s troops “come like... (full context)
Warfare Theme Icon
...now have to take on King Henry’s thirty thousand troops at a great numerical disadvantage. Hotspur, though, remains optimistic and keen to charge into battle, calling the others to ride into... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 3
Warfare Theme Icon
Back at the rebel camp near Shrewsbury, Hotspur and Douglas want to charge straight into battle that night, hoping to defeat King Henry’s... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
The Right to be King Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Hotspur replies that King Henry “knows at what time to promise, when to pay” and launches... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Sir Walter Blunt asks whether he should convey their commitment to King Henry, but Hotspur says not to and tells Blunt that he’ll send his uncle with their reply in... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 4
Language Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
...the Archbishop’s allegiance with the rebels so the Archbishop fears that, if the king defeats Hotspur at Shrewsbury, he’ll attack the Archbishop next. He sends Sir Michael off with the letters... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 1
Honor Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
Prince Hal chimes in to praise Hotspur’s famous honor and courage and says that, though he has none of Hotspur’s noble deeds... (full context)
Warfare Theme Icon
Prince Hal doubts the rebels will accept peace because Douglas and Hotspur are so hot to fight. King Henry, Sir Walter Blunt, and Prince John exit to... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 2
Language Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
...would forever after remain suspicious of the rebels as “interpretation will misquote our looks.” Because Hotspur is just a hot-headed youth, his father Northumberland and Worcester himself would end up paying... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
Hotspur and Douglas enter with officers and soldiers and Worcester tells Hotspur that, despite his own... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
Hotspur calls his troops to arms, telling them to put themselves in the mood for battle... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 3
Honor Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
...bravely all day and says he needs to keep his sword to protect himself from Hotspur. When Hal reaches into Falstaff’s sword sheath to take his sword, he finds a bottle... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 4
Honor Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
Hotspur enters and confronts Prince Hal, who tells Hotspur that England isn’t big enough for the... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Warfare Theme Icon
Hotspur falls, wounded, and declares to Prince Hal that his loss of noble honor “wound[s] my... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
Noticing Hotspur on the ground, Falstaff is frightened, and stabs the body to make sure Hotspur is... (full context)
Appearances Theme Icon
Honor Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
...truly him. Falstaff brandishes the corpse on his shoulder, telling the princes he has killed Hotspur. When Hal balks at the story, Falstaff swears on his life that he himself delivered... (full context)