How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?

by

Moustafa Bayoumi

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Al Jazeera Term Analysis

A major global media network owned by the government of Qatar (a small, wealthy, highly developed country on the Arabian Peninsula), which is often controversial in the West for presenting multiple competing viewpoints about Middle Eastern politics.

Al Jazeera Quotes in How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?

The How Does It Feel to Be a Problem? quotes below are all either spoken by Al Jazeera or refer to Al Jazeera. For each quote, you can also see the other terms and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Racism, Discrimination, and Foreign Policy Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin edition of How Does It Feel to Be a Problem? published in 2008.
Omar Quotes

“But look, Omar,” she said. “I'm a friend of your family. And just for the future, I'd like to warn you.” She paused. “This,” she said, pointing to the line on his résumé that Omar was most proud of, his work at Al Jazeera, “this could work against you in the future. Especially if you want to get work with people who feel threatened by the whole Arab thing.”

Related Characters: Moustafa Bayoumi (speaker), Omar
Page Number: 208
Explanation and Analysis:
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Al Jazeera Term Timeline in How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?

The timeline below shows where the term Al Jazeera appears in How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Omar
Racism, Discrimination, and Foreign Policy Theme Icon
Justice, Activism, and the Future of American Democracy Theme Icon
...market nine months before, when he graduated with a communications degree and an internship at Al Jazeera . Now he wonders, “could it be that American media organizations won’t hire him because... (full context)
Arab American Identities Theme Icon
Growing Up and Self-Discovery Theme Icon
Justice, Activism, and the Future of American Democracy Theme Icon
...dressed in a suit after a job interview, and he talks about his work at Al-Jazeera and aspirations to work at an American media network. He is half-Chilean, half-Palestinian, and speaks... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Foreign Policy Theme Icon
Growing Up and Self-Discovery Theme Icon
Justice, Activism, and the Future of American Democracy Theme Icon
In early 2005, Omar interviews for a job with Al Jazeera ’s office in the UN. He is immediately impressed by the main correspondent and explains... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Foreign Policy Theme Icon
Growing Up and Self-Discovery Theme Icon
Justice, Activism, and the Future of American Democracy Theme Icon
...nonprofit housing organization run by a family acquaintance, who tells him that his time at Al Jazeera “could work against [him] in the future.” Soon thereafter, his supervisor calls it “a terrorist... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Foreign Policy Theme Icon
Growing Up and Self-Discovery Theme Icon
...major network involves discrimination—not necessarily against his Arab identity, but there is definitely suspicion of Al Jazeera . His friends and cousins with “much more Arabic-sounding names” all have jobs already. Omar’s... (full context)