How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?

by

Moustafa Bayoumi

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The primary religious scripture in Islam and the most important text in Arabic literature, which God reportedly revealed to the Prophet Muhammad piece by piece over his last 23 years of life. Muslim religious services often include recitations of the Qur’an (also a popular competitive activity) and sermons interpreting it.

Qur’an Quotes in How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?

The How Does It Feel to Be a Problem? quotes below are all either spoken by Qur’an or refer to Qur’an. For each quote, you can also see the other terms and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Racism, Discrimination, and Foreign Policy Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin edition of How Does It Feel to Be a Problem? published in 2008.
Rami Quotes

But still it's not enough. “There are a lot of Muslims,” Ezzat says, “but there is no Islam.”

Related Characters: Moustafa Bayoumi (speaker), Ezzat (speaker), Rami
Page Number: 223
Explanation and Analysis:
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How Does It Feel to Be a Problem? PDF

Qur’an Term Timeline in How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?

The timeline below shows where the term Qur’an appears in How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Omar
Arab American Identities Theme Icon
Faith, Tradition, and Islam Theme Icon
Growing Up and Self-Discovery Theme Icon
...Later, they would make the engagement official by publicly reciting the first chapter of the Qur’an. But if he does not find a job, there is no chance Nadine’s family will... (full context)
Rami
Faith, Tradition, and Islam Theme Icon
Justice, Activism, and the Future of American Democracy Theme Icon
...muscular; Ezzat, 21, is talkative and just as imposing. Rami recites a verse from the Qur’an—both are devout, and both their fathers are elsewhere: Rami’s in a New Jersey detention center,... (full context)
Arab American Identities Theme Icon
Faith, Tradition, and Islam Theme Icon
...His family is not very religious, so he first learns to pray and study the Qur’an from his uncle. Rami’s father manages to buy his own store, which summarily burns down.... (full context)
Faith, Tradition, and Islam Theme Icon
Growing Up and Self-Discovery Theme Icon
Rami turns to the Qur’an for solace, listening to a famous reciter on the internet while he follows along with... (full context)
Faith, Tradition, and Islam Theme Icon
...he knows his religion is the right one, how he knows that Allah wrote the Qur’an—Rami is speechless, and when they switch roles, he is astonished at Ezzat’s brilliant explanations of... (full context)
Faith, Tradition, and Islam Theme Icon
...not blame the West or advocate violence; rather, they focus on teaching morality through the Qur’an, and Rami begins seeking to propagate his knowledge, a practice called da‘wa. He takes a... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Foreign Policy Theme Icon
Faith, Tradition, and Islam Theme Icon
Growing Up and Self-Discovery Theme Icon
Justice, Activism, and the Future of American Democracy Theme Icon
Bayoumi accompanies Rami and Mohammad for their da‘wa work, sending free Qur’ans to anyone who requests them from a tiny office in Staten Island—about 3,000 per month,... (full context)
Racism, Discrimination, and Foreign Policy Theme Icon
Faith, Tradition, and Islam Theme Icon
...chat with another man named Mohammad, a recent immigrant from Egypt; once, they talk about Qur’anic recitation and imagine preaching in Mecca, then notice the police searching a car nearby and... (full context)
Faith, Tradition, and Islam Theme Icon
Growing Up and Self-Discovery Theme Icon
...Rami talks, eloquently but a bit nervously, about coping with death and dying “with the Qur’an in your heart.” Muslims should rebuild the Islamic world for themselves by “purify[ing] your hearts,”... (full context)