How I Learned to Drive

by

Paula Vogel

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Li’l Bit Character Analysis

Li’l Bit is the play’s central protagonist and the object of Uncle Peck’s sexual advances. A woman approaching thirty-five years old, her first act on stage is to introduce the play, saying that “sometimes to tell a secret you first have to teach a lesson.” What follows is built almost entirely from her recollections, told in fragments and jumping around chronologically. The play can thus be read as a journey into Li’l Bit’s psyche, through which the audience is asked to experience Li’l Bit’s trauma and memories as she goes over what happened with her uncle. In many of these fragments she is very young, ranging between eleven (in the play’s penultimate scene) to seventeen. As a young girl, she is sexually naïve but aware of her uncle’s attraction to her and, to a degree, encourages the attention. While at high school, she becomes aware of her increasing sexualization as those around her, like Uncle Peck, fixate on her breasts. Though she wants guidance from her mother and grandmother (channeled by the female and teenage choruses), they fail to help her. Over the course of their “relationship” she grows more and more confused, sometimes viewing Peck as a paternal figure, sometimes feeling attraction for him, and often feeling disgust at his actions. She is keen to get a good education, expressing an interest in Shakespeare, but is increasingly destabilized by what happens with her uncle. Just before she turns eighteen, when her relationship with Peck technically become “legal,” she finds the courage to tell her uncle that she doesn’t want to see him again. Ultimately, this allows her to move on, and in the final scene, after. checking her tires and adjusting her seat just like her uncle taught her, she drives off in her car, feeling a sense of power and freedom.

Li’l Bit Quotes in How I Learned to Drive

The How I Learned to Drive quotes below are all either spoken by Li’l Bit or refer to Li’l Bit. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Gender and Misogyny Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Theater Communications Group edition of How I Learned to Drive published in 2018.
How I Learned to Drive Quotes

It’s 1969. And I am very old, very cynical of the world, and I know it all. In short, I am seventeen years old, parking off a dark lane with a married man on an early summer night.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Uncle Peck
Related Symbols: Driving/Cars
Page Number: 9
Explanation and Analysis:

PECK. Don’t change the subject. I was talking about how good I am. (Beat.) Are you ever gonna let me show you how good I am?

LI’L BIT. Don’t go over the line now.

PECK. I won’t. I’m not gonna do anything you don’t want me

to do.

LI’L BIT. That’s right.

PECK. And I’ve been good all week.

LI’L BIT. You have?

PECK. Yes. All week. Not a single drink.

LI’L BIT. Good boy.

PECK. Do I get a reward? For not drinking?

LI’L BIT. A small one. It’s getting late.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Uncle Peck (speaker)
Related Symbols: Driving/Cars, The Line
Page Number: 10-11
Explanation and Analysis:

FEMALE GREEK CHORUS. (As mother). And of course, we were so excited to have a baby girl that when the nurse brought you in and said, “It’s a girl! It’s a baby girl!” I just had to see for myself. So we whipped your diapers down and parted your chubby little legs — and right between your legs there was—(Peck has come over during the above and chimes along:)
PECK. GREEK CHORUS.
Just a little bit. Just a little bit.

FEMALE GREEK CHORUS. (As mother). And when you were born, you were so tiny that you fit in Uncle Peck’s outstretched hand. (Peck stretches his hand out.)

Related Characters: Uncle Peck (speaker), Female Greek Chorus (speaker), Li’l Bit’s Mother (speaker), Li’l Bit
Page Number: 12-13
Explanation and Analysis:

MALE GREEK CHORUS. (As Grandfather.) How is Shakespeare going to help her lie on her back in the dark? (Li’l Bit is on her feet.)

LI’L BIT. You’re getting old. Big Papa. You are going to die —v ery very soon. Maybe even tonight. And when you get to heaven, God’s going to be a beautiful black woman in a long white robe. She’s gonna look at your chart and say: Uh-oh. Fornication. Dog-ugly mean with blood relatives. Oh. Uh-oh. Voted for George Wallace. Well, one last chance: If you can name the play, all will be forgiven. And then she’ll quote: “The quality of mercy is not strained." Your answer? Oh, too bad — Merchant of Venice: Act IV, Scene iii. And then she’ll send your ass to fry in hell with all the other crackers. Excuse me, please.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Male Greek Chorus (speaker), Li’l Bit’s Grandfather (speaker)
Page Number: 14-15
Explanation and Analysis:

PECK. Your grandfather’s ignorant. And you’re right — he’s going to die soon. But he’s family. Family is... family.

LI’L BIT. Grown-ups are always saying that. Family.

PECK. Well, when you get a little older, you’ll see what we’re saying.

LI’L BIT. Uh-huh. So family is another acquired taste, like French kissing?

PECK. Come again?

LI’L BIT. You know, at first it really grosses you out, but in time you grow to like it?

PECK. Girl, you are... a handful.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Uncle Peck (speaker), Li’l Bit’s Grandfather
Page Number: 15-16
Explanation and Analysis:

TEENAGE GREEK CHORUS. (As Grandmother.) Your grandfather only cares that I do two things: have the table set and the bed turned down.

Page Number: 26
Explanation and Analysis:

And dramaturgically speaking, after the faltering and slightly comical “first act,” there was the very briefest of inter missions, and an extremely capable and forceful and sustained second act. And after the second act climax and a gentle denouement — before the post-play discussion — I lay on my back in the dark and I thought about you, Uncle Peck. Oh. Oh — this is the allure. Being older. Being the first. Being the translator, the teacher, the epicure, the already jaded. This is how the giver gets taken.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Uncle Peck
Page Number: 29
Explanation and Analysis:

LI’L BIT. 1967. In a parking lot of the Beltsville Agricultural Farms. The Initiation into a Boy's First Love.

PECK. (With a soft look on his face.) Of course, my favorite car will always be the ’56 Bel Air Sports Coupe. Chevy sold more ’55s, but the ’56! — a V-8 with Corvette option, 225 horse power; went from zero to sixty miles per hour in 8.9 seconds.

LI’L BIT. (To the audience.) Long after a mother's tits, but before a woman’s breasts:

PECK. Super-Turbo-Fire! What a Power Pack — mechanical lifters, twin four-barrel carbs, lightweight valves, dual exhausts —

LI’L BIT. (To the audience.) After the milk but before the beer:

PECK. A specific intake manifold, higher-lift camshaft, and the tightest squeeze Chevy had ever made —

LI’L BIT. (To the audience.) Long after he's squeezed down the birth canal but before he’s pushed his way back in: The boy falls in love with the thing that bears his weight with speed.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Uncle Peck (speaker)
Related Symbols: Driving/Cars
Page Number: 32
Explanation and Analysis:

PECK. So if you’re going to drive with me, I want you to take this very seriously.

LI’L BIT. I will, Uncle Peck. I want you to teach me to drive.

PECK. Good. You’re going to pass your test on the first try. Perfect score. Before the next four weeks are over, you’re going to know this baby inside and out. Treat her with respect.

LI’L BIT. Why is it a “she?”

PECK. Good question. It doesn't have to be a “she” — but when you close your eyes and think of someone who responds to your touch — someone who performs just for you and gives you what you ask for—I guess I always see a “she.” You can call her what you like.

LI’L BIT. (To the audience.) I closed my eyes — and decided not to change the gender.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Uncle Peck (speaker)
Related Symbols: Driving/Cars
Page Number: 35
Explanation and Analysis:

FEMALE GREEK CHORUS. You know, you should take it as a compliment that the guys want to watch you jiggle. They’re guys. That’s what they’re supposed to do.

LI’L BIT. I guess you’re right. But sometimes I feel like these alien life forces, these two mounds of flesh have grafted the selves onto my chest, and they’re using me until they can “propagate” and take over the world and they’ll just keep growing, with a mind of their own until I collapse under their weight and they suck all the nourishment out of my body and I finally just waste away while they get bigger and bigger and — (Li’l Bit’s classmates are just staring at her in disbelief.)

FEMALE GREEK CHORUS. — You are the strangest girl I have ever met. (Li’l Bit’s trying to joke but feels on the verge of tears.)

LI’L BIT. Or maybe someone’s implanted radio transmitters in my chest at a frequency I can’t hear, that girls can’t detect, but they’re sending out these signals to men who get mesmerized, like sirens, calling them to dash themselves on these “rocks” —

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Female Greek Chorus (speaker)
Page Number: 38
Explanation and Analysis:

PECK. For a thirteen year old, you have a body a twenty-year-old woman would die for.

LI’L BIT. The boys in school don’t think so.

PECK. The boys in school are little Neanderthals in short pants. You’re ten years ahead of them in maturity; it’s gonna take a while for them to catch up. (Peck clicks another shot; we see a faint smile on Li’l Bit on the screen.)

Girls turn into women long before boys turn into men.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Uncle Peck (speaker)
Page Number: 41
Explanation and Analysis:

PECK. Well, Li’l Bit — let me explain it this way. There are some people who have a... a “fire” in the belly. I think they go to work on Wall Street or they run for office. And then there are people who have a “fire” in their heads — and they become writers or scientists or historians. (He smiles a little at

her.) You. You’ve got a “fire” in the head. And then there are people like me.
LI’L BIT. Where do you have... a fire?

PECK. I have a fire in my heart. And sometimes the drinking helps.

LI’L BIT. There’s got to be other things that can help.

PECK. I suppose there are.

LI’L BIT. Does it help — to talk to me?

PECK. Yes. It does. (Quiet.) I don’t get to see you very much.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Uncle Peck (speaker)
Page Number: 46
Explanation and Analysis:

LI’L BIT. — Well, what the hell were those numbers all about! Forty-four days to go —only two more weeks.—And then just numbers—69—68—67—like some serial killer!

PECK. Li’l Bit! Whoa! This is me you’re talking to—I was just trying to pick up your spirits, trying to celebrate your birthday.

LI’L BIT. My eighteenth birthday. I'm not a child, Uncle Peck. You were counting down to my eighteenth birthday.

PECK. So?

LI’L BIT. So? So statutory rape is not in effect when a young woman turns eighteen. And you and I both know it. (Peck is walking on ice.)

PECK. I think you misunderstand.

LI’L BIT. 1 think I understand all too well. I know what you want to do five steps ahead of you doing it. Defensive Driving 101.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Uncle Peck (speaker)
Related Symbols: Driving/Cars
Page Number: 49
Explanation and Analysis:

LI’L BIT. Uncle Peck — I’ve been thinking a lot about this — and I came here tonight to tell you that — I’m not doing very well. I’m getting very confused — I can’t concentrate on my work — and now that I’m away — I’ve been going over and over it in my mind — and I don’t want us to “see” each other anymore. Other than with the rest of the family.

PECK. (Quiet.) Are you seeing other men?

LI’L BIT. (Getting agitated.) I — no, that’s not the reason — I — well, yes, I am seeing other — listen, it’s not really any body’s business!

PECK. Are you in love with anyone else?

LI’L BIT. That’s not what this is about.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Uncle Peck (speaker)
Page Number: 51
Explanation and Analysis:

PECK. Li’l Bit. Listen. Listen. Open your eyes and look at me. Come on. Just open your eyes, honey. (Li’l Bit, eyes squeezed shut, refuses.) All right then. I just want you to listen. Li’l Bit — I’m going to ask you just this once. Of your own free will. Just lie down on the bed with me — our clothes on — just lie down with me, a man and a woman... and let’s... hold one another. Nothing else. Before you say anything else. I want the chance to... hold you. Because sometimes the body knows things that the mind isn’t listening to... and after I’ve held you, then I want you to tell me what you feel.

LI'L BIT. You’ll just... hold me?

PECK. Yes. And then you can tell me what you’re feeling. (Li’l Bit half wanting to run, half wanting to get it over with, half wanting to be held by him.)

LI’L BIT. Yes. All right. Just hold. Nothing else.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Uncle Peck (speaker)
Page Number: 52
Explanation and Analysis:

LI’L BIT. Now that I’m old enough, there are some questions I would have liked to have asked him. Who did it to you, Uncle Peck? How old were you? Were you eleven? (Peck moves to the driver’s seat of the car and waits.) Sometimes I think of my uncle as a kind of Flying Dutch man. In the opera, the Dutchman is doomed to wander the sea; but every seven years he can come ashore, and if he finds a maiden who will love him of her own free will — he will be released.
And I see Uncle Peck in my mind, in his Chevy ’56, a spirit driving up and down the back roads of Carolina — looking for a young girl who, of her own free will, will love him. Release him.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Uncle Peck
Related Symbols: Driving/Cars
Page Number: 54-55
Explanation and Analysis:

FEMALE GREEK CHORUS. (As Mother.) I am not letting an eleven-year-old girl spend seven hours alone in the car with a man... I don’t like the way your uncle looks at you.

LI’L BIT. For god’s sake, mother! Just because you’ve gone through a bad time with my father — you think every man is evil!

FEMALE GREEK CHORUS. (As Mother.) Oh no, Li’l Bit not all men... We... we just haven’t been very lucky with the men in our family.

LI’L BIT. Just because you lost your husband — I still deserve a chance at having a father! Someone! A man who will look out for me! Don’t I get a chance?

FEMALE GREEK CHORUS. (As Mother.) I will feel terrible if something happens.

LI’L BIT. Mother! It’s in your head! Nothing will happen! I can take care of myself. And I can certainly handle Uncle Peck.

FEMALE GREEK CHORUS. (As Mother.) All right. But I’m warning you — if anything happens, I hold you responsible.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Female Greek Chorus (speaker), Li’l Bit’s Mother (speaker), Uncle Peck
Related Symbols: Driving/Cars
Page Number: 55-56
Explanation and Analysis:

TEENAGE GREEK CHORUS. Am I doing it right?

PECK. That’s right. Now, whatever you do, don’t let go of the wheel. You tell me whether to go faster or slower —

TEENAGE GREEK CHORUS. Not so fast, Uncle Peck!

PECK. Li’l Bit — I need you to watch the road — (Peck puts his hands on Li’l Bit’s breasts. She relaxes against him, silent, accepting his touch.)

TEENAGE GREEK CHORUS. Uncle Peck — what are you doing?

PECK. Keep driving. (He slips his hands under her blouse.)

TEENAGE GREEK CHORUS. Uncle Peck — please don’t do this —

PECK. —Just a moment longer... (Peck tenses against Li’l Bit.)

TEENAGE GREEK CHORUS. (Trying not to cry.) This isn’t happening. (Peck tenses more, sharply. He buries his face in Li’l Bit’s neck, and moans softly.)

Related Characters: Uncle Peck (speaker), Teenage Greek Chorus (speaker), Li’l Bit
Related Symbols: Driving/Cars
Page Number: Book Page 57
Explanation and Analysis:

LI’L BIT. The nearest sensation I feel — of flight in the body — I guess I feel when I’m driving. On a day like today. It’s five a.m. The radio says it’s going to be clear and crisp. I’ve got five hundred miles of highway ahead of me — and some back roads too. I filled the tank last night, and had the oil checked. Checked the tires, too. You’ve got to treat her... with respect.

Related Characters: Li’l Bit (speaker), Uncle Peck
Related Symbols: Driving/Cars
Page Number: 57-58
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire How I Learned to Drive LitChart as a printable PDF.
How I Learned to Drive PDF

Li’l Bit Character Timeline in How I Learned to Drive

The timeline below shows where the character Li’l Bit appears in How I Learned to Drive. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
How I Learned to Drive
Memory and Trauma Theme Icon
An official-sounding voice announces, “Safety first —You and Driver Education.” Li’l Bit , a “well-endowed” woman of around thirty-five years of age, comes on stage. She announces... (full context)
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Peck and Li’l Bit are in his car. He tells her he loves the smell of her hair and,... (full context)
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Peck insists that he has been “good” and wants to show Li’l Bit how good he is. She tells him not to “go over the line” and then... (full context)
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Peck rubs Li’l Bit ’s breasts, saying “I tell you, you can keep all the cathedrals of Europe. Just... (full context)
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Back in the present, Li’l Bit explains how members of her family are nicknamed for their genitalia. Her mother was called... (full context)
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...“Driving in First Gear.” The scene is now a typical family dinner in 1969, and Li’l Bit ’s family is commenting on the size of her breasts. The male chorus, in the... (full context)
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As Li’l Bit gets increasingly infuriated with her grandfather, Peck cautions her not to “let him get to... (full context)
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Li’l Bit retorts that Big Papa is going to die soon, and that when he’s at the... (full context)
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In these situations, explains Li’l Bit in the present, she would then storm out of the house weeping. Her Aunt Mary,... (full context)
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Peck would then have a heart to heart with Li’l Bit , reassuring her while also insisting that “Family is… family.” He says that she’ll understand... (full context)
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The action cuts forward to 1970. Li’l Bit explains that she got kicked out of her “fancy school” and that rumors were flying... (full context)
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The off-stage voice cuts in, announcing, “You and the Reverse Gear.” In this scene, Li’l Bit is at a high-end restaurant with Peck, celebrating passing her driving test. He suggests that... (full context)
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Here, the female chorus interjects as Li’l Bit ’s mother to give “A Mother’s Guide to Social Drinking.” It instructs that a lady... (full context)
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Back in the restaurant, Li’l Bit orders a dry martini, which Peck calls a “drink fit for a woman of the... (full context)
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Li’l Bit has one more drink, allowed by the waiter because Peck implies that he will pay... (full context)
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Having left the restaurant, Li’l Bit and Peck sit in his car. He intends to take her home, but she asks... (full context)
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Peck asks Li’l Bit : “have I forced you to anything?” He tells her that they are just enjoying... (full context)
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Li’l Bit then addresses the audience, introducing what she calls “On Men, Sex and Women: Part 1.”... (full context)
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The female chorus/ Li’l Bit ’s mother states that men only want one thing, “and once they have it they... (full context)
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...insisting she’s never had one and that they’re made up. The female chorus reveals that Li’l Bit ’s grandmother was fourteen—and still a believer in Santa and the Easter Bunny—when she met... (full context)
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The action flashes forward briefly to 1979, when Li’l Bit is twenty-seven. She meets a man who is ten years her junior on a bus... (full context)
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The play moves on to “On Men, Sex and Women: Part II.” This time, Li’l Bit is fifteen years old. She tentatively asks her grandmother and mother, played by the same... (full context)
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The two choruses argue, with the mother wanting to give Li’l Bit the information that her own mother failed to do. The teenage chorus/grandmother shouts that, “if... (full context)
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...she had known more about “the facts of life,” she wouldn’t have had to marry Li’l Bit ’s father. The teenage chorus/grandmother says it was her own fault. The male chorus interjects... (full context)
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...the same song playing on the radio in Peck’s car, in which he sits with Li’l Bit . It is 1967. As Peck talks enthusiastically about his first car, Li’l Bit addresses... (full context)
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This scene is one of Li’l Bit ’s driving lessons with Peck. He asks her what the first thing is to “adjust,”... (full context)
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In a serious tone, Peck insists on how important it is to him that Li’l Bit learn to drive well. He tells her that she is the closest thing to a... (full context)
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Li’l Bit promises to take Peck’s teaching seriously. In return, he says, she’ll be able to pass... (full context)
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Li’l Bit recounts some of her high school experiences, all of which involve her breasts. The male... (full context)
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...school vignette takes place in the gym showers. The female chorus and teenage chorus trick Li’l Bit into showering first. They are amazed to see that her breasts are real; the female... (full context)
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The next vignette begins with the off-stage voice saying, “Were You Prepared?” Li’l Bit is talking to the female chorus about feeling self-conscious. Meanwhile, Peck is setting up a... (full context)
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The female chorus tells Li’l Bit that she should “take it as a compliment that the guys want to watch you... (full context)
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Li’l Bit then puts forward another metaphor for her breasts: “maybe someone’s implanted radio transmitters in my... (full context)
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Suddenly it’s 1965 and Li’l Bit is in Peck’s basement. Peck is adjusting the camera on his tripod. He puts on... (full context)
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Peck trains the camera on Li’l Bit and asks her to respond to the music with her body, “almost like dancing.” He... (full context)
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Peck tells Li’l Bit that “for a thirteen-year-old, you have a body a twenty-year old woman would die for.”... (full context)
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As Peck tells her that she looks “beautiful,” Li’l Bit praises the beauty of Aunt Mary (Peck’s wife). Peck says that Aunt Mary’s beauty doesn’t... (full context)
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...keep this up,” says Peck, “in five years’ time we’ll have a really professional portfolio.” Li’l Bit is shocked, wondering what he’s referring too. He says that she needs to be eighteen... (full context)
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Peck is adamant that there’s nothing wrong in what they’re doing. As Li’l Bit continues to complain about Peck’s intentions with the photographs, he tries to calm her down,... (full context)
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Li’l Bit has her eyes firmly closed. Peck asks her to look at him and tells her... (full context)
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...the female chorus/Aunt Mary doesn’t blame her husband: he “fights against it.” She instead blames Li’l Bit for being such a “sly one.” Aunt Mary can’t wait till Li’l Bit goes off... (full context)
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...action shifts back to Christmas 1964 (with the off-stage voice repeating, “You and Reverse Gear”). Li’l Bit is in the kitchen with Peck. The latter has an apron on and is doing... (full context)
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Li’l Bit seems concerned with Peck’s well-being. She asks him why he drinks so much. He explains... (full context)
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Out of sympathy for Peck, Li’l Bit offers to make a deal with him. She proposes that they meet once a week... (full context)
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...late 1969. The male and female choruses read out notes and gifts from Peck to Li’l Bit . They are sent to her college dorm room, and include chocolates, roses, a tape... (full context)
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The messages from Peck grow increasingly desperate, counting down the days to Li’l Bit ’s eighteenth birthday (when he plans to visit her) and asking her to send him... (full context)
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The off-stage voice announces: “Shifting Forward from Third to Fourth gear.” It’s December 10, 1969. Li’l Bit and Peck are in a “very nice” hotel room, an ice bucket with champagne in... (full context)
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Li’l Bit accuses Peck of wanting to her celebrate her birthday because it makes her legal to... (full context)
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Peck asks why—if she’s so “pissed off”— Li’l Bit wanted to meet in the hotel room instead of a restaurant. She explains that she... (full context)
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Peck toasts to Li’l Bit ’s birthday and asks how her schooling is going. She explains that she thinks she... (full context)
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The small talk fades away. After a brief silence, both Li’l Bit and Peck try to speak; they both have something to say. Peck goes first, explaining... (full context)
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Peck, hurt, asks if Li’l Bit has been seeing other men, and if she’s in love with anyone else. Agitated, she... (full context)
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Peck downs his champagne and asks Li’l Bit to open her eyes. All he wants, he says, is to lie down on the... (full context)
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Peck and Li’l Bit hold each other on the bed. The male chorus and the female chorus (who is... (full context)
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Li’l Bit leans in to kiss Peck, but “wrenches herself free.” She lies in response to his... (full context)
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Back in the present, Li’l Bit addresses the audience. She explains how she never saw Peck again. Over the seven years... (full context)
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Now that she’s old enough, says Li’l Bit , she has a question she wishes she could ask Peck: “Who did it to... (full context)
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The off-stage voice announces a shift back in “reverse gear” to the summer of 1962. Li’l Bit is trying to convince her mother (played by the female chorus) to let her spend... (full context)
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Li’l Bit tries to reassure the female chorus/mother that “nothing will happen!” She says that just because... (full context)
Family and Abuse Theme Icon
Memory and Trauma Theme Icon
Sexuality Theme Icon
...to 1962, the “first driving lesson.” On the backroads of Carolina, Peck offers to let Li’l Bit drive, even though she is well under age. For this scene only, Li’l Bit’s lines... (full context)
Family and Abuse Theme Icon
Memory and Trauma Theme Icon
Sexuality Theme Icon
Li’l Bit can’t reach the car’s pedals, so Peck gets her to sit on his lap and... (full context)
Family and Abuse Theme Icon
Memory and Trauma Theme Icon
Peck and the teenage chorus fade away. Li’l Bit steps out of the car as the off-stage voice announces: “Driving in Today’s World.” The... (full context)
Gender and Misogyny Theme Icon
Family and Abuse Theme Icon
Memory and Trauma Theme Icon
Sexuality Theme Icon
Li’l Bit says she has still “never known what it feels like to jog or dance. Anything... (full context)
Family and Abuse Theme Icon
Memory and Trauma Theme Icon
Sexuality Theme Icon
Getting into the car, Li’l Bit checks “the most important control on the dashboard—the radio.” As she tries to find the... (full context)