Howards End

by

E. M. Forster

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Margaret Schlegel Character Analysis

Margaret is twenty-nine years old and unmarried at the beginning of Howards End, unusual for a woman at the time. She has been watching over her younger siblings, Helen and Tibby, since the age of thirteen, when their mother died. Their mother was an English heiress who married a German intellectual. Never having been to university, Margaret is nonetheless highly educated and cultured. With an inherited fortune ensuring lifelong financial security, she enjoys unlimited leisure time to study art, literature, and philosophy, and tends to muse deeply about human nature and society. She loves deeply, as well, and her generous love for her family, her country, and her husband can compel her to overlook their worst flaws. She makes a sudden and profound connection with Ruth Wilcox, a woman her mother’s age, before Ruth’s death at just fifty-one years old. Ruth leaves her old house, Howards End, to Margaret, but Ruth’s family refuses to accept her wishes and keeps her will a secret. Margaret then gradually develops an affection for Ruth’s widowed husband, Henry, despite their dramatically different temperaments, and marries him. Her relationship with Henry leads her to forgo some of her former principles. Earlier in the novel, she and Helen befriended a young man named Leonard Bast, and became troubled by his financial hardship and his difficulties achieving his modest dreams of becoming knowledgeable about art. When later she learns that Leonard’s wife, Jacky, was Henry’s mistress long ago, she swiftly abandons the Basts to abject poverty. She remains loyal to her sister above all, and defies Henry when he tries to stop Helen from sleeping in Howards End on Helen’s final night in England. After the crisis that follows, she brings both the Wilcox and the Schlegel families together in Howards End, and reconciles them to building a new future together. Henry finally gives her Howards End, and she bequeaths it to her nephew, Helen’s son.

Margaret Schlegel Quotes in Howards End

The Howards End quotes below are all either spoken by Margaret Schlegel or refer to Margaret Schlegel. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Class and Privilege Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Dover Thrift Editions edition of Howards End published in 2002.
Chapter 4 Quotes

“When I saw all the others so placid, and Paul mad with terror in case I said the wrong thing, I felt for a moment that the whole Wilcox family was a fraud, just a wall of newspapers and motor-cars and golf-clubs, and that if it fell I should find nothing behind it but panic and emptiness.”

Related Characters: Helen Schlegel (speaker), Margaret Schlegel, Paul Wilcox
Related Symbols: Cars and Walks
Page Number: 17
Explanation and Analysis:
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“The truth is that there is a great outer life that you and I have never touched—a life in which telegrams and anger count. Personal relations, that we think supreme, are not supreme there. There love means marriage settlements, death, death duties. So far I’m clear. But here my difficulty. This outer life, though obviously horrid; often seems the real one—there’s grit in it. It does breed character. Do personal relations lead to sloppiness in the end?”

“Oh, Meg—, that’s what I felt, only not so clearly, when the Wilcoxes were so competent, and seemed to have their hands on all the ropes.”

Related Characters: Margaret Schlegel (speaker), Helen Schlegel (speaker), Paul Wilcox
Page Number: 18
Explanation and Analysis:
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“It is the vice of a vulgar mind to be thrilled by bigness, to think that a thousand square miles are a thousand times more wonderful than one square mile, and that a million square miles are almost the same as heaven.”

Related Characters: Margaret Schlegel
Related Symbols: Howards End
Page Number: 20
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 5 Quotes

It will be generally admitted that Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony is the most sublime noise that has ever penetrated into the ear of man…you are bound to admit that such a noise is cheap at two shillings. It is cheap, even if you hear it in the Queen’s Hall, dreariest music-room in London, though not as dreary as the Free Trade Hall, Manchester; and even if you sit on the extreme left of that hall, so that the brass bumps at you before the rest of the orchestra arrives, it is still cheap.

Related Characters: Margaret Schlegel, Leonard Bast
Page Number: 21
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 7 Quotes

“You and I and the Wilcoxes stand upon money as upon islands. It is so firm beneath our feet that we forget its very existence. It’s only when we see some one near us tottering that we realise all that an independent income means. Last night, when we were talking up here round the fire, I began to think that the very soul of the world is economic, and that the lowest abyss is not the absence of love, but the absence of coin.”

Related Characters: Margaret Schlegel (speaker), Juley Munt
Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 14 Quotes

…[Leonard’s] outburst ended in a swamp of books. No disrespect to these great names. The fault is ours, not theirs. They mean us to use them for sign-posts, and are not to blame if, in our weakness, we mistake the sign-post for the destination. And Leonard had reached the destination. He had visited the county of Surrey when darkness covered its amenities, and its cosy villas had re-entered ancient night. Every twelve hours this miracle happens, but he had troubled to go and see for himself. Within his cramped little mind dwelt something that was greater than Jefferies’ books—the spirit that led Jefferies to write them.

Related Symbols: Cars and Walks, Books
Page Number: 85-86
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Chapter 15 Quotes

“It is so slurred over and hushed up, there is so little clear thinking…so few of us think clearly about our own private incomes, and admit that independent thoughts are in nine cases out of ten the result of independent means. Money: give Mr. Bast money, and don’t bother about his ideals. He’ll pick up those for himself.”

Related Characters: Margaret Schlegel (speaker), Leonard Bast
Related Symbols: Books
Page Number: 90
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 19 Quotes

“I don’t intend him, or any man or any woman, to be all my life—good heavens, no! There are heaps of things in me that he doesn’t, and shall never, understand.”

Thus she spoke before the wedding ceremony and the physical union, before the astonishing glass shade had fallen that interposes between married couples and the world. She was to keep her independence more than do most women as yet…Yet he did alter her character—a little. There was an unforeseen surprise, a cessation of the winds and odours of life, a social pressure that would have her think conjugally.

Related Characters: Margaret Schlegel (speaker)
Page Number: 125
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 20 Quotes

It was the first [Margaret] had heard of the mews behind Ducie Street. When she was a possible tenant it had suppressed itself, not consciously, but automatically. The breezy Wilcox manner, though genuine, lacked the clearness of vision that is imperative for truth. When Henry lived in Ducie Street he remembered the mews; when he tried to let he forgot it; and if any one had remarked that the mews must be either there or not, he would have felt annoyed, and afterwards have found some opportunity of stigmatising the speaker as academic. So does my grocer stigmatise me when I complain of the quality of his sultanas, and he answers in one breath that they are the best sultanas, and how can I expect the best sultanas at that price? It is a flaw inherent in the business mind, and Margaret may do well to be tender to it, considering all that the business mind has done for England.

Related Characters: Margaret Schlegel, Henry Wilcox
Page Number: 130
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 22 Quotes

Whether as boy, husband, or widower, [Henry] had always the sneaking belief that bodily passion is bad…Religion had confirmed him. The words that were read aloud on Sunday to him and to other respectable men were the words that had once kindled the souls of St. Catherine and St. Francis into a white-hot hatred of the carnal. He could not be as the saints and love the Infinite with a seraphic ardour, but he could be a little ashamed of loving a wife. Amabat, amare timebat. And it was here that Margaret hoped to help him.

…Only connect! That was the whole of her sermon. Only connect the prose and the passion, and both will be exalted, and human love will be seen at its height.

Related Characters: Margaret Schlegel, Henry Wilcox
Page Number: 134
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 23 Quotes

[Margaret] was glad to go there, for Henry had implied his business rather than described it, and the formlessness and vagueness that one associates with Africa itself had hitherto brooded over the main sources of his wealth. Not that a visit to the office cleared things up…even when she penetrated to the inner depths, she found only the ordinary table and Turkey carpet, and though the map over the fireplace did depict a helping of West Africa, it was a very ordinary map. Another map hung opposite, on which the whole continent appeared, looking like a whale marked out for blubber.

Related Characters: Margaret Schlegel, Henry Wilcox
Page Number: 140
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 25 Quotes

Nothing could have exceeded the kindness of the two men. They raised windows for some ladies, and lowered them for others, they rang the bell for the servant, they identified the colleges as the train slipped past Oxford, they caught books or bag-purses in the act of tumbling on to the floor…. Margaret bowed to a charm of which she did not wholly approve, and said nothing when the Oxford colleges were identified wrongly. “Male and female created He them”; the journey to Shrewsbury confirmed this questionable statement, and the long glass saloon, that moved so easily and felt so comfortable, became a forcing-house for the idea of sex.

Related Characters: Margaret Schlegel
Page Number: 150
Explanation and Analysis:
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[Charles] described what he believed to have happened. Albert had flattened out a cat, and Miss Schlegel had lost her nerve, as any woman might. She had been got safely into the other car, but when it was in motion had leapt out again, in spite of all that they could say. After walking a little on the road, she had calmed down and had said that she was sorry. His father accepted this explanation, and neither knew that Margaret had artfully prepared the way for it. It fitted in too well with their view of feminine nature.

Related Symbols: Cars and Walks
Page Number: 153-154
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Chapter 26 Quotes

“I shall never get work now. If rich people fail at one profession, they can try another. Not I. I had my groove, and I’ve got out of it. I could do one particular branch of insurance in one particular office well enough to command a salary, but that’s all. Poetry’s nothing, Miss Schlegel. One’s thoughts about this and that are nothing. Your money, too, is nothing, if you’ll understand me. I mean if a man over twenty once loses his own particular job, it’s all over with him. I have seen it happen to others. Their friends gave them money for a little, but in the end they fall over the edge. It’s no good. It’s the whole world pulling. There always will be rich and poor.”

Related Characters: Leonard Bast (speaker), Margaret Schlegel
Related Symbols: Books
Page Number: 162
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 29 Quotes

Now and then [Henry] asked [Margaret] whether she could possibly forgive him, and she answered, “I have already forgiven you, Henry.” She chose her words carefully, and so saved him from panic. She played the girl, until he could rebuild his fortress and hide his soul from the world. When the butler came to clear away, Henry was in a very different mood—asked the fellow what he was in such a hurry for, complained of the noise last night in the servants’ hall. Margaret looked intently at the butler. He, as a handsome young man, was faintly attractive to her as a woman—an attraction so faint as scarcely to be perceptible, yet the skies would have fallen if she had mentioned it to Henry.

Related Characters: Margaret Schlegel (speaker), Henry Wilcox
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 33 Quotes

All was not sadness. The sun was shining without. The thrush sang his two syllables on the budding guelder-rose. Some children were playing uproariously in heaps of golden straw. It was the presence of sadness at all that surprised Margaret, and ended by giving her a feeling of completeness. In these English farms, if anywhere, one might see life steadily and see it whole, group in one vision its transitoriness and its eternal youth, connect—connect without bitterness until all men are brothers.

Related Characters: Margaret Schlegel
Related Symbols: Howards End
Page Number: 192
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 38 Quotes

“You shall see the connection if it kills you, Henry! You have had a mistress—I forgave you. My sister has a lover—you drive her from the house. Do you see the connection? Stupid, hypocritical, cruel—oh, contemptible!—a man who insults his wife when she’s alive and cants with her memory when she’s dead. A man who ruins a woman for his pleasure, and casts her off to ruin other men. And gives bad financial advice, and then says he is not responsible. These men are you. You can’t recognise them, because you cannot connect… Only say to yourself, ‘What Helen has done, I’ve done.’”

Page Number: 221
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 42 Quotes

Margaret was silent. Something shook her life in its inmost recesses, and she shivered.

“I didn’t do wrong, did I?” [Henry] asked, bending down.

“You didn’t, darling. Nothing has been done wrong.”

From the garden came laughter. “Here they are at last!” exclaimed Henry, disengaging himself with a smile. Helen rushed into the gloom, holding Tom by one hand and carrying her baby on the other. There were shouts of infectious joy.

“The field’s cut!” Helen cried excitedly—“the big meadow! We’ve seen to the very end, and it’ll be such a crop of hay as never!”

Related Characters: Margaret Schlegel (speaker), Helen Schlegel (speaker), Henry Wilcox (speaker), Ruth Wilcox
Related Symbols: Howards End
Page Number: 246
Explanation and Analysis:
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Margaret Schlegel Character Timeline in Howards End

The timeline below shows where the character Margaret Schlegel appears in Howards End. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
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Helen Schlegel writes three letters to her older sister “Meg,” or Margaret. Helen is staying at Howards End, an “old and little” house in the English countryside.... (full context)
Chapter 2
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Margaret shares Helen’s news with her aunt, Juley Munt, who is staying at the Schlegels’ home... (full context)
Chapter 3
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...the train, Mrs. Munt recalls when her sister Emily died after giving birth to Tibby. Margaret was only thirteen at the time, but she insisted that she didn’t need Juley to... (full context)
Chapter 4
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...family and his home, and he was momentarily swept up in her affection. She tells Margaret how she and Paul shared a magical kiss and exchanged promises on Sunday evening, but... (full context)
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Helen and Margaret despair that such a simple, natural thing as human relations, however messy, should cause such... (full context)
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Margaret and Helen resume the life of “personal relations,” hosting many agreeable people and promoting temperance,... (full context)
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Helen mostly agrees with Margaret about the importance of the “unseen,” although her character is less steady and responsible than... (full context)
Chapter 5
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Margaret, Helen, Tibby, and Mrs. Munt attend a performance of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, joined by the... (full context)
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...and emptiness!” that she leaves the concert early. The unfamiliar young man sitting next to Margaret notices that Helen accidentally grabbed his umbrella in her hasty exit. Margaret asks Tibby to... (full context)
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Margaret is offended that the boy seems to think that they intentionally stole his umbrella and... (full context)
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Margaret talks about art at length as they walk, and the boy wishes he could keep... (full context)
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Margaret chastises Helen for rudely frightening the boy away: “You oughtn’t to talk about stealing or... (full context)
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...coaxed him into stopping, instead of letting him be swamped by screaming women.” She and Margaret are shaken by this fleeting encounter, a brush with poverty resounding like “a goblin footfall”... (full context)
Chapter 7
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...Aunt Juley is anxious that a proximity to Paul may rekindle Helen’s disastrous infatuation, but Margaret declares that there can be no great risk of real disaster as long as one... (full context)
Chapter 8
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...the newcomer should wait to be called upon. Rather than call upon her in turn, Margaret writes her a letter to say that it would be best if the two families... (full context)
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Mrs. Wilcox replies that Margaret should not have written such a letter, because she had called to say that Paul... (full context)
Chapter 9
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Margaret hosts a luncheon-party to introduce Mrs. Wilcox to some of her friends, but they have... (full context)
Chapter 10
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Mrs. Wilcox asks Margaret to join her in shopping for Christmas presents one morning. Margaret is a great help... (full context)
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Over lunch, Margaret changes her mind, having understood that “Mrs. Wilcox, though a loving wife and mother, had... (full context)
Chapter 11
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...by Mrs. Wilcox. The note states that she wishes Howards End to be left to Margaret Schlegel. The Wilcoxes declare that such a note, handwritten in pencil by an invalid, could... (full context)
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Charles frets that Margaret could have colluded with his mother to acquire Howards End and may come down at... (full context)
Chapter 12
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As Henry predicted, Margaret was indeed unaware of Mrs. Wilcox’s wish for her to inherit Howards End. She wouldn’t... (full context)
Chapter 13
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Tibby returns from Oxford for Easter, and Margaret urges him to choose a profession to pursue. Tibby is reluctant to take up any... (full context)
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Helen interrupts Tibby and Margaret to exclaim that a poor woman has just visited the house, asking for her missing... (full context)
Chapter 14
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...Wickham Place the next day. The Schlegels don’t recognize him, but he reminds them that Margaret gave him her card after Helen took his umbrella years ago. His wife, Jacky, later... (full context)
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Helen and Margaret are thrilled by Leonard’s departure from mundane life. Though it was just a haphazard march... (full context)
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Helen and Margaret invite Leonard to call again, but he refuses, claiming that the connection they shared today... (full context)
Chapter 15
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Helen and Margaret go to a dinner party after their stimulating meeting with Leonard. After dinner, they debate... (full context)
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...make himself nearly a millionaire. He speaks patronizingly to the sisters, which Helen resents but Margaret forgives in a man of his age. When they tell him about their recent debate... (full context)
Chapter 16
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Margaret and Helen have Leonard over to discuss his company. He doesn’t like talking to them... (full context)
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...replies that it was rude of them to start “picking [his] brains for official information.” Margaret insists that she and Helen only sought to befriend him because of their mutual ambition... (full context)
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Henry smugly warns Margaret against trying to befriend such people who “aren’t our sort.” Margaret repeats that she and... (full context)
Chapter 17
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Margaret is fretting about their move when Evie invites her to lunch with her and her... (full context)
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Henry observes that Margaret talks to him the same way he heard her speaking to Leonard Bast, and she... (full context)
Chapter 18
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While staying with Aunt Juley, Margaret receives a letter from Henry saying that he plans to rent out his house in... (full context)
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Once they begin touring the house, Henry proposes to her quite unromantically. Margaret kindly pretends to be surprised, and she averts her eyes to avoid embarrassing him as... (full context)
Chapter 19
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Margaret returns to Aunt Juley’s house with her news. Helen bursts into tears when she realizes... (full context)
Chapter 20
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Margaret and Henry discuss their future. Henry mentions that he owns some shares in a currant-farm... (full context)
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Next Henry and Margaret talk about where to live—Howards End has been rented out to a tenant, Oniton is... (full context)
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Henry walks Margaret back to her aunt’s house and kisses her abruptly, without saying a word before or... (full context)
Chapter 21
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Charles objects to the news of his father’s engagement to Margaret. He rebukes his wife, Dolly, blaming her for setting up his sister, Evie, with her... (full context)
Chapter 22
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The next day, Margaret greets Henry with tenderness. She is eager to help him see how, in their marriage,... (full context)
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...passion is bad,” Henry is “ashamed” to admit he loves his wife. “Amabat, amare timebat,” Margaret thinks, or “he loved, and feared loving.” She wants him to overcome his fear and... (full context)
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Helen joins Margaret and Henry for a walk. Margaret tells Henry that Helen received a letter from Leonard... (full context)
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Henry then asks Margaret to go up to Howards End with him next week, which she says she would... (full context)
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Alone with Margaret, Helen denounces such men who “talk of the survival of the fittest, and cut down... (full context)
Chapter 23
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Margaret and Helen reconcile before Margaret leaves for Howards End, and Helen agrees to be civil... (full context)
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...Henry drops her off and drives over to get the key from the neighboring farmhouse, Margaret discovers that the house is unlocked, and she enters alone. The empty house is still... (full context)
Chapter 24
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The old woman who startled Margaret at Howards End was Miss Avery, a former friend of Ruth’s who lives on the... (full context)
Chapter 25
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Like Charles, Evie was unhappy at the news that her father was engaged to Margaret Schlegel, viewing it as an insult to their mother’s memory. But the onset of her... (full context)
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Margaret is distraught that only men have been left behind to manage the accident, and she... (full context)
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...they arrive at Oniton, Charles tells Henry what happened. They agree all too easily that Margaret was simply overcome by nerves and lost her senses. Nonetheless, Charles remains suspicious of the... (full context)
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While Charles speculates, he sees Margaret wander outside and happily behold her new home. She exclaims to herself, “I love this... (full context)
Chapter 26
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Margaret makes an effort to get to know the house and the town before the wedding.... (full context)
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At breakfast, Margaret observes Henry going about the day’s business with his customary stoicism, even on the occasion... (full context)
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...in the road to the church that will be difficult to manage by car, and Margaret asks if they can simply walk the short distance instead. He insists that “One can’t... (full context)
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Margaret and Henry look for the butler among the large crew of new servants to show... (full context)
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...business advice. While furious at Helen for acting so rashly and making such a scene, Margaret is sympathetic to Leonard’s plight, and she promises her sister that she will ask Henry... (full context)
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Margaret sits down with Henry and asks him if he could possibly offer her friend Leonard... (full context)
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However, Margaret’s happiness is diminished when she and Henry find Jacky still in the garden, having a... (full context)
Chapter 27
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...believes that no harm has been done. Leonard thanks her for working everything out with Margaret and Henry. Helen wants to discuss theories of personal responsibility, but Leonard has become jaded... (full context)
Chapter 28
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Back at Oniton, Margaret sits paralyzed for a time, then begins to compose a letter. She writes to Henry,... (full context)
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Despite everything, Margaret still faithfully believes that “Henry must have it as he liked, for she loved him,... (full context)
Chapter 29
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The next morning, Margaret greets Henry at breakfast and tells him what she had meant to write the previous... (full context)
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Margaret is not moved by Henry’s shallow emotional appeals and wishes he would plainly acknowledge the... (full context)
Chapter 30
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...going back to Wickham Place, but is leaving for Germany. She asks him to give Margaret her love and tell her that she wishes to be alone. She seems quite distraught,... (full context)
Chapter 31
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...empty after the former renter left. Miss Avery will continue to look after the property. Margaret and Henry are married quietly at Margaret’s insistence, without the grand celebration that was once... (full context)
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...the reminder of his narrowly avoided scandal and ruin. He is glad to have married Margaret after all—pleased with a wife whose interest in poetry or social issues distinguishes her from... (full context)
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Margaret is unhappy to be yet again without a permanent home. They spend the winter in... (full context)
Chapter 32
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Dolly pays Margaret a visit, and Margaret shows her the plans for the big house she and Henry... (full context)
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Dolly tells Margaret that Miss Avery has unpacked some of the Schlegels’ belongings being stored at Howards End.... (full context)
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...returned it. Miss Avery was extremely insulted and threw the necklace into her duck pond. Margaret agrees that returning the necklace was rude of Evie, given that it was probably presented... (full context)
Chapter 33
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Margaret goes down to the town of Hilton to see what has become of her stored... (full context)
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Miss Avery’s niece, Madge, takes Margaret to meet Miss Avery at Howards End, telling Margaret how her aunt has become more... (full context)
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Margaret politely tours Howards End with Miss Avery, and notes that her furniture and possessions suit... (full context)
Chapter 34
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...sick with minor colds and coughs all winter, Aunt Juley comes down with acute pneumonia. Margaret and Tibby go down to be at her bedside, and Helen plans to come back... (full context)
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Margaret is greatly concerned by Helen’s continued absence. She has not seen her sister in eight... (full context)
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Margaret can’t believe that her sister continues to go to such lengths to avoid seeing her.... (full context)
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...for her at Howards End, but brought her to a nursing home instead. He tells Margaret she should write to Helen, pretending to be highly offended and informing her that her... (full context)
Chapter 35
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Margaret and Henry lunch with Dolly before heading over to Howards End to ambush Helen. Margaret... (full context)
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Henry picks up a doctor, and Margaret becomes more and more convinced that the men’s attitudes about Helen are all clinical and... (full context)
Chapter 36
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Margaret cannot speak to the men at first. Henry orders her to give them the keys... (full context)
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The doctor weakly suggests that Helen could be suffering from a nervous breakdown, but Margaret disagrees defiantly. She says that her sister’s situation requires great affection, which neither man has... (full context)
Chapter 37
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Margaret apologizes to her sister for her grave betrayal of her trust. Helen explains that she... (full context)
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Helen asks Margaret if they may spend one last night together in the house, fully furnished with all... (full context)
Chapter 38
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Margaret talks with Henry at Charles’s house. Henry says he told Charles about Helen and Charles... (full context)
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Margaret asks Henry if Helen may stay the night at Howards End. He refuses, saying he... (full context)
Chapter 39
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...prejudiced against Helen, stemming from her disastrous entanglement with Paul. He suspects that she and Margaret are trying to get Howards End, and he feels very possessive of the house, despite... (full context)
Chapter 40
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Margaret and Helen talk at Howards End, each repenting for their part in the disastrous confrontation... (full context)
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...enthusiastic about justice now.” She describes how overwrought she was by the time she got Margaret’s letters, and how dismayed she was to learn of Leonard’s dual humiliation at Henry’s hands.... (full context)
Chapter 41
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Leonard briefly sees Margaret in St. Paul’s Cathedral one day and feels compelled to confess his mistake to her.... (full context)
Chapter 42
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...returns to his house in Hilton, where Henry tells him what happened with Helen and Margaret earlier. Henry entrusts his son with escorting Helen and Margaret from Howards End first thing... (full context)
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Margaret explains that Leonard had been in the final stages of heart disease. Charles is so... (full context)
Chapter 43
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...and he agrees that Leonard died of heart disease. The police also arrive and question Margaret about Leonard and Charles. She doesn’t feel Charles to be responsible for Leonard’s heart attack... (full context)
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...Helen plans to leave for Germany, where she can live without as much social stigma. Margaret plans to accompany her sister and help her raise her child. She is unable to... (full context)
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Henry summons Margaret to Charles’s house, where she returns the keys to Howards End and tells him she... (full context)
Chapter 44
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...takes Helen’s young son to play with the hay Tom’s father is harvesting. Helen and Margaret are sitting on the lawn at the edge of the field while the Wilcoxes talk... (full context)
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Helen thanks Margaret for heroically settling them all down at Howards End, instead of leaving Helen to raise... (full context)
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Paul calls Margaret into the house, where Henry, Evie, Dolly and he are sitting in an airless room,... (full context)
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When everyone else has left, Margaret asks Henry what Dolly meant, and he explains what happened after his wife’s death years... (full context)