The character of Richard Rodriguez in Hunger of Memory from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes

Hunger of Memory

Richard Rodriguez Character Analysis

Rodriguez grew up in Sacramento, California, the third child of Mexican immigrant parents. From a young age, he loved books and he achieved great academic success, earning degrees from Stanford and Columbia, as well as receiving a Fulbright Scholarship. Ultimately, however, Rodriguez’s discomfort with affirmative action and his alienation from his colleagues led him to leave his job as a university professor to focus on his writing. Though Rodriguez is the author of this book, he is also a character within the text. Rodriguez’s narrative voice is distinct from the character of his childhood self, and this distance allows Rodriguez (as the author) to reflect on Rodriguez the boy and describe the profound changes he has experienced as a result of his education. Rodriguez’s narrative voice encompasses an impressive range—lyrical, didactic, elegiac—demonstrating that, although his opinions may generate controversy, he is without doubt a master of his craft.

Richard Rodriguez Quotes in Hunger of Memory

The Hunger of Memory quotes below are all either spoken by Richard Rodriguez or refer to Richard Rodriguez. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Private vs. Public Identity Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Dial Press edition of Hunger of Memory published in 2004.
Prologue Quotes

Aztec ruins hold no special interest for me. I do not search Mexican graveyards for ties to unnamable ancestors. I assume I retain certain features of gesture and mood derived from buried lives. I also speak Spanish today. And read García Lorca and García Márquez at my leisure. But what consolation can that fact bring against the knowledge that my mother and father have never heard of García Lorca or García Márquez?

Related Symbols: Books
Page Number: 3-4
Explanation and Analysis:
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Language has been the great subject of my life. In college and graduate school, I was registered as an “English major.” But well before then, from my first day of school, I was a student of language. Obsessed by the way it determined my public identity. The way it permits me here to describe myself, writing…

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker)
Page Number: 6
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 1 Quotes

The odd truth is that my first-grade classmates could have become bilingual, in the conventional sense of that word, more easily than I. Had they been taught (as upper-middle-class children are often taught early) a second language like Spanish or French, they could have regarded it simply as that: another public language. In my case such bilingualism could not have been so quickly achieved. What I did not believe was that I could speak a single public language.

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker)
Page Number: 18
Explanation and Analysis:
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One Saturday morning I entered the kitchen where my parents were talking in Spanish. I did not realize that they were talking in Spanish however until, at the moment they saw me, I heard their voices change to speak English. Those gringo sounds they uttered startled me. Pushed me away. In that moment of trivial misunderstanding and profound insight, I felt my throat twisted by unsounded grief. I turned quickly and left the room. But I had no place to escape to with Spanish. (The spell was broken.) My brother and sisters were speaking English in another part of the house.

Related Symbols: Silence
Page Number: 20-21
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My mother met the wrath of her brother, her only brother, when he came up from Mexico one summer with his family. He saw his nieces and nephews for the very first time. After listening to me, he looked away and said what a disgrace it was that I couldn’t speak Spanish, “su propio idioma.” He made that remark to my mother; I noticed, however, that he stared at my father.

Page Number: 29
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He wanted to know what she had said. I started to tell him, to say—to translate her Spanish words into English. The problem was, however, that though I knew how to translate exactly what she had told me, I realized that any translation would distort the deepest meaning of her message: It had been directed only to me. This message of intimacy could never be translated because it was not in the words she had used but passed through them. So any translation would have seemed wrong; her words would have been stripped of an essential meaning.

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker), Rodriguez’s Grandmother
Page Number: 31
Explanation and Analysis:
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Behind this screen there gleams an astonishing promise: One can become a public person while still remaining a private person. At the very same time one can be both! There need be no tension between the self in the crowd and the self apart from the crowd! Who would not want to believe such an idea? Who can be surprised that the scheme has won the support of many middle-class Americans?

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker)
Page Number: 35
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 2 Quotes

Those times I remembered the loss of my past with regret, I quickly reminded myself of all the things my teachers could give me. (They could make me an educated man.) I tightened my grip on pencil and books. I evaded nostalgia. Tried hard to forget. But one does not forget by trying to forget. One only remembers. I remembered too well that education had changed my family’s life. I would not have become a scholarship boy had I not so often remembered.

Related Symbols: Books
Page Number: 53
Explanation and Analysis:
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Months later, two weeks of Christmas vacation: The first hours home were the hardest. (“What’s new?”) My parents and I sat in the kitchen for a conversation. (But, lacking the same words to develop our sentences and to shape our interests, what was there to say? What could I tell them of the term paper I had just finished on the “universality of Shakespeare’s appeal”?)

Related Symbols: Silence
Page Number: 61
Explanation and Analysis:
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Playfully she ran through complex sentences, calling the words alive with her voice, making it seem that the author somehow was speaking directly to me. I smiled just to listen to her. I sat there and sensed for the very first time some possibility of fellowship between a reader and a writer, a communication, never intimate like that I heard spoken words at home convey, but one nonetheless personal.

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker)
Related Symbols: Silence, Books
Page Number: 64
Explanation and Analysis:
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Here is no fabulous hero, no idealized scholar-worker. The scholarship boy does not straddle, cannot reconcile, the two great opposing cultures of his life. His success is unromantic and plain. He sits in the classroom and offers those sitting beside him no calming reassurance about their own lives.

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker)
Page Number: 70
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Negatively (for that is how this idea first occurred to me): My need to think so much and so abstractly about my parents and our relationship was in itself an indication of my long education. … And yet, positively: The ability to consider experience so abstractly allowed me to shape into desire what would otherwise have remained indefinite, meaningless longing in the British Museum.

Page Number: 77
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Chapter 3 Quotes

When all else was different for me (as a scholarship boy) between the two worlds of my life, the Church provided an essential link. During my first months in school, I remember being struck by the fact that—although they worshipped in English—the nuns and my classmates shared my family’s religion. The gringos were, in some way, like me, católicos.

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker)
Page Number: 87
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A child whose parents could not introduce him to books like Grimm’s Fairy Tales, I was introduced to the spheres of enchantment by the nighttime Catholicism of demons and angels. The superstitious Catholicism of home provided a kind of proletarian fairy world.

Related Symbols: Books
Page Number: 92
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In ceremonies of public worship, [my parents] have been moved, assured that their lives—all aspects of their lives, from waking to eating, from birth until death, all moments—possess great significance. Only the liturgy has encouraged them to dwell on the meaning of their lives. To think.

Page Number: 96
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Chapter 4 Quotes

The normal, extraordinary, animal excitement of feeling my body alive—riding shirtless on a bicycle in the warm wind created by furious self-propelled motion—the sensations that first had excited in me a sense of my maleness, I denied. I was too ashamed of my body. I wanted to forget that I had a body because I had a brown body.

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker)
Page Number: 135
Explanation and Analysis:
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At such times I suspected that education was making me effeminate. The odd thing, however, was that I did not judge my classmates so harshly. Nor did I consider my male teachers in high school effeminate. It was only myself I judged against some shadowy, mythical Mexican laborer—dark like me, yet very different.

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker)
Page Number: 137
Explanation and Analysis:
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In my bedroom were books by poets and novelists—books that I loved—in which male writers published feelings the men in my family never revealed or acknowledged in words. And it seemed to me that there was something unmanly about my attachment to literature. Even today, when so much about the myth of the macho no longer concerns me, I cannot altogether evade such notions.

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker), Rodriguez’s Father
Related Symbols: Books
Page Number: 139
Explanation and Analysis:
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I would not learn in three months what my father had meant by “real work.” I was not bound to this job; I could imagine its rapid conclusion. For me the sensation of exertion and fatigue could be savored. For my father or uncle, working at comparable jobs when they were my age, such sensations were to be feared.

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker), Rodriguez’s Father
Page Number: 143
Explanation and Analysis:
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I stood there. I wanted to say something more. But what could I say in Spanish, even if I could have pronounced the words right? Perhaps I just wanted to engage them in small talk, to be assured of their confidence, our familiarity. I thought for a moment to ask them where in Mexico they were from. Something like that. And maybe I wanted to tell them (a lie, if need be) that my parents were from the same part of Mexico.

Related Symbols: Silence
Page Number: 145
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That is only to say that my complexion assumes its significance from the context of my life. My skin, in itself, means nothing. I stress the point because I know there are people who would label me “disadvantaged” because of my color. They make the same mistake I made as a boy, when I thought a disadvantaged life was circumscribed by particular occupations. … But I was not one of los pobres. What made me different from them was an attitude of mind, my imagination of myself.

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker)
Page Number: 148
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 5 Quotes

Academics would have violated their generation’s ideal of openness if they had said that their schools couldn’t accommodate disadvantaged Americans. To have acknowledged the truth about their schools, moreover, academics would have had to acknowledge their own position of privilege. And that would have been difficult. The middle-class academy does not deeply impress on students or teachers a sense of social advantage. The campus has become a place for “making it” rather than a place for those who, relatively speaking, “have it made.”

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker)
Page Number: 165
Explanation and Analysis:
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Chapter 6 Quotes

Adulthood seemed consumed by memory. I would tell myself otherwise. I would tell myself that the act of remembering is an act of the present. (In writing this autobiography, I am actually describing the man I have become—the man in the present.)

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker)
Related Symbols: Silence
Page Number: 190
Explanation and Analysis:
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My mother must use a high-pitched tone of voice when she addresses people who are not relatives. It is a tone of voice I have all my life heard her use away from the house. Coming home from grammar school with new friends, I would hear it, its reminder: My new intimates were strangers to her. Like my sisters and brother, over the years, I’ve grown used to hearing that voice. Expected to hear it. Though I suspect that voice has played deep in my soul, sounding a lyre, to recall my “betrayal,” my movement away from our family’s intimate past.

Page Number: 191-192
Explanation and Analysis:
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I have come to think of myself as engaged in writing graffiti. Encouraged by physical isolation to reveal what is most personal; determined at the same time to have my words seen by strangers. I have come to understand better why works of literature—while never intimate, never individually addressed to the reader—are so often among the most personal statements we hear in our lives.

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker)
Related Symbols: Books
Page Number: 203
Explanation and Analysis:
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All those faraway childhood mornings in Sacramento, walking together to school, [my siblings and I] talked but never mentioned a thing about what concerned us so much: the great event of our schooling, the change it forced on our lives. Years passed. Silence grew thicker, less penetrable. We grew older without ever speaking to each other about any of it. Intimacy grooved our voices in familiar notes; familiarity defined the limits of what could be said. Until we became adults. And now we see each other most years at noisy family gatherings where there is no place to stop the conversation, no right moment to turn the heads of listeners, no way to essay this, my voice.

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker), Rodriguez’s Siblings
Related Symbols: Silence
Page Number: 207
Explanation and Analysis:
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My mother stands waving toward no one in particular. She seems sad to me. How sad? Why? (Sad that we all are going home? Sad that it was not quite, can never be, the Christmas one remembers having had once?) I am tempted to ask her quietly if there is anything wrong. (But these are questions of paradise, Mama.)

Related Characters: Richard Rodriguez (speaker), Rodriguez’s Mother
Related Symbols: Silence
Page Number: 211-212
Explanation and Analysis:
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Richard Rodriguez Character Timeline in Hunger of Memory

The timeline below shows where the character Richard Rodriguez appears in Hunger of Memory. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Prologue: Middle-Class Pastoral
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Rodriguez sketches the arc of his life in broad strokes. “Once upon a time,” he writes,... (full context)
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Rodriguez also lays out the various ways in which he has been viewed by different groups.... (full context)
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Rodriguez elaborates by describing his memoir as a pastoral, a hymn to middle-class life. He claims... (full context)
Chapter 1: Aria
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Rodriguez started school knowing only fifty words of English. He lived in a middle-class neighborhood, and... (full context)
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Rodriguez describes his childhood growing up in a Spanish-speaking home. The sounds of Spanish were soft... (full context)
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Rodriguez elaborates on his disapproval of bilingual education. He points out that supporters of this policy... (full context)
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Rodriguez recalls a defining moment in his life: a trio of nuns from his Catholic school... (full context)
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Rodriguez returns to the question of bilingual education. “Bilingualists,” he writes, are convinced that schools should... (full context)
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Because he was caught between Spanish and English, Rodriguez’s childhood was one of “disabling confusion.” He recalls family members who would tease him about... (full context)
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Again, Rodriguez returns to the question of bilingual education. He argues that languages like Spanish or black... (full context)
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Rodriguez fondly recalls his childhood as a “magical realm of sound.” He confesses that he still... (full context)
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“Aria” closes with Rodriguez’s poetic remembrance of the last time he saw his grandmother before she died. He can... (full context)
Chapter 2: The Achievement of Desire
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Rodriguez achieved great academic success, beginning his schooling barely speaking English and ending up as a... (full context)
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When he was working on his dissertation in Britain, Rodriguez encountered Richard Hoggart’s The Uses of Literacy, which was unique in that it specifically addressed... (full context)
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Throughout his childhood, people commented on how proud Rodriguez’s parents must have been of him. Rodriguez says that these comments felt ironic to him,... (full context)
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Rodriguez begins to explore his relationship with books. Hoggart writes that the scholarship boy sees books... (full context)
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Continuing with the question of the scholarship boy, Rodriguez writes that other students and academics loathe the scholarship boy because the contrast between his... (full context)
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Rodriguez recalls the moment of intense disillusionment he felt while working on his graduate dissertation. He... (full context)
Chapter 3: Credo
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This essay opens with a handful of memories from the childhoods of Rodriguez’s mother and father. Rodriguez emphasizes that his parents recall growing up in Mexican towns “where... (full context)
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Rodriguez writes, “I was un católico before I was a Catholic.” As a child he didn’t... (full context)
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Rodriguez outlines some key lessons from various stages of his education. He goes on to recall... (full context)
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Rodriguez shifts to detailing some of the changes he has noticed in the Church over time... (full context)
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Rodriguez admits that, when he was younger, he would never have discussed his spirituality openly. He... (full context)
Chapter 4: Complexion
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Rodriguez first describes how, in his current life as a respected author, he meets many people... (full context)
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Rodriguez reflects on the fact that he and his older sister are the only members of... (full context)
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Rodriguez elaborates that his extended family members shared his mother’s (and sister’s) preference for light skin.... (full context)
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Expanding his discussion further, Rodriguez explains how important symbols and appearances were to his parents. He recalls that when his... (full context)
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Rodriguez writes that his first memory of “sexual excitement” is linked to his sense of his... (full context)
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In one of the most extended vignettes of the memoir, Rodriguez describes the summer construction job he worked while an undergraduate at Stanford. The job was... (full context)
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Rodriguez draws the essay to a close by arguing that interpretations of his complexion are based... (full context)
Chapter 5: Profession
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Rodriguez opens this essay by explaining that he has been the beneficiary of affirmative action. This... (full context)
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Rodriguez provides a brief history of affirmative action. He argues that this policy has its roots... (full context)
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Rodriguez elaborates on the reasons he thinks affirmative action has been a failed policy. He argues... (full context)
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Rodriguez admits that he is guilty of having accepted the benefits of affirmative action, even after... (full context)
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Rodriguez further details his argument that affirmative action is only a superficial solution. He writes that,... (full context)
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Thus far, Rodriguez has been addressing the status of affirmative action in the 1960s. He now shifts to... (full context)
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Rodriguez shifts focus to discuss the white student protests that occurred during his years in graduate... (full context)
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Closing the essay, Rodriguez reflects on the deep uneasiness he began to feel in the mid-1970s as he began... (full context)
Chapter 6: Mr. Secrets
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Rodriguez recalls how, following the publication of his first autobiographical essay, he received a letter from... (full context)
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Rodriguez continues, arguing that his mother’s use of the phrase los gringos indicates that his mother... (full context)
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Rodriguez describes struggling to explain to his parents his impulse to write. Once, when his mother... (full context)
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Rodriguez begins to reflect on what is contained in his parents’ silence. He wonders about his... (full context)
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Rodriguez writes that he responded to his mother’s letter, trying to explain to her that he... (full context)
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Rodriguez writes that he sees his brother and sisters a couple of times a year, but... (full context)