I Am Malala

Tor Pekai Yousafzai Character Analysis

Malala’s mother, Tor Pekai, is a loving parent, though she lacks the necessary education to inspire her daughter as Ziauddin, her husband, does. She is intensely religious, and always prays five times a day (as the Quran suggests). Tor Pekai often feels insecure about her lack of a formal education, especially because Ziauddin is an educated, literate man. Nevertheless, she shares her husband’s passion for equality, and encourages Malala to learn and speak out against the Taliban. In a sense, Tor Pekai represents a cautionary tale for Malala: while Malala loves her mother, she lobbies for women to enjoy the educational opportunities that her mother was never given.
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Tor Pekai Yousafzai Character Timeline in I Am Malala

The timeline below shows where the character Tor Pekai Yousafzai appears in I Am Malala. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: A Daughter Is Born
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...Malala’s father, unlike the majority of Swati men, never hits his wife, whose name is Tor Pekai . Malala notes that the people in her community aspire to have paler skin. Malala’s... (full context)
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Malala continues describing her family. Tor Pekai is very religious, and always prays five times a day, as is the Muslim custom.... (full context)
Chapter 2: My Father the Falcon
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...his bravery. Shortly after his “conversion” to jihad, Ziauddin met Faiz Mohammed, the brother of Tor Pekai , his future wife. Faiz Muhammed helped to convince Ziauddin to reconsider his desire for... (full context)
Chapter 3: Growing up in a School
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...notes that her mother began and finished school at the age of six. At first Tor Pekai was proud of being the only girl in her school, but ultimately, she couldn’t force... (full context)
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...college. He was a good teacher, but the pay was low. He planned to marry Tor Pekai , but found that he didn’t have enough money to do so. One of his... (full context)
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In the midst of his financial difficulties, Ziauddin married Tor Pekai . He kept this information fairly private—in Pakistan, weddings are huge, expensive affairs, and if... (full context)
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Malala continues describing her parents’ history. Ziauddin, now married to Tor Pekai , set to work improving his new school. Tor Pekai helped out by painting the... (full context)
Chapter 4: The Village
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...had the qualities of both of her grandfathers: like Rohul, she was vocal, and like Tor Pekai ’s grandfather, she was calm and wise. Malala loved to spend time with Rohul, whom... (full context)
Chapter 6: Children of the Rubbish Mountain
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...his school. Ziauddin agreed—over the years, he’d given away many free places because Malala and Tor Pekai asked him to do so. At this point, Ziauddin’s school had more than 800 students,... (full context)
Chapter 21: ‘God, I entrust her to you’
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...the news of Malala spread, more women came to her grandmother’s house to pray. When Tor Pekai learned of the true nature of Malala’s injury, she was horrified, but didn’t get to... (full context)
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In the evening of Malala’s first day in the hospital, Tor Pekai and Malala’s brother Atal arrive at the hospital. When they see Malala, they both begin... (full context)
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...swell in response to the shards of bone. For the next several hours, Ziauddin and Tor Pekai wait for news. Eventually, Colonel Junaid emerges from the operating room, saying that Malala will... (full context)
Chapter 22: Journey into the Unknown
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...the UK, since they want to “save face.” As the days drag on, Ziauddin and Tor Pekai have no idea that these arguments are occurring. (full context)
Chapter 23: A Girl Shot in the Head, Birmingham
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In Pakistan, Tor Pekai becomes increasingly worried that the Pakistani government isn’t making any arrangements for them to travel... (full context)
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In all, it takes ten days for Ziauddin and Tor Pekai to fly to England. In the meantime, Malala enjoys talking with Dr. Reynolds, but can... (full context)
Chapter 24: They Have Snatched Her Smile
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...spoke to her parents, she’s traveled to four hospitals across thousands of miles. Ziauddin and Tor Pekai are equally emotional. Malala is also glad to see her brothers, who’ve traveled to England... (full context)
Epilogue: One Child, One Teacher, One Book, One Pen
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...and all their possessions are back in Swat. Malala’s family eats well in Birmingham, though Tor Pekai feels guilty about being so well fed when there are starving children in Pakistan. Malala... (full context)
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Malala’s father has adjusted to life in Birmingham somewhat more successfully than Tor Pekai , but he misses his school in Pakistan. He spends much of his time attending—and... (full context)